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author:("seek, ogur")
1.  Percutaneous Fixation of Anterior Column Acetabular Fracture in a Renal Transplant Recipient 
Case Reports in Orthopedics  2013;2013:842390.
Renal transplantation, performed per million population, ranges from 30 to 60 in developed countries. The transplanted kidney is generally placed in iliac fossa; therefore the treatment procedure of the pelvic trauma in these patients should be selected carefully. The gold standard technique for the treatment of displaced acetabulum fractures is open reduction and internal fixation. Our patient had received a living-related-donor renal transplant due to chronic renal failure. In the second year of transplantation, she had been injured in a motor-vehicle accident, and radiographs showed a right acetabular anterior column fracture and left pubic rami fractures. The patient was treated with percutaneous fixation techniques and at one year of postoperative period there was no evidence of degenerative signs and the clinical outcome was good. Beside having the advantage of avoiding dissection through the iliac fossa by the standard ilioinguinal approach, percutaneous techniques, with shorter surgical time, decreasing soft tissue disruption, and the potential for early discharge from hospital might be ideal for a renal transplant recipient carrying a higher risk of infection. Percutaneous fixation of selected acetabular fractures in a renal transplant recipient would presumably have the potential to decrease the morbidity associated with traditional open surgical procedures.
doi:10.1155/2013/842390
PMCID: PMC3703359  PMID: 23844299
2.  Management of Persistent Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage Following Thoraco-lumbar Surgery 
Asian Spine Journal  2012;6(3):157-162.
Study Design
This was a retrospective study of patients who had developed a dural tear after thoracic and lumbar spine surgery that was not recognized during the surgery, and was treated either by lumbar drainage or over-sewing of the wounds.
Purpose
To revisit the treatment strategies in postoperative dural leaks and present our experience with over-sewing of the wound and lumbar drainage.
Overview of Literature
Unintended durotomy is a frequent complication of spinal surgery. Management of subsequent cerebrospinal fluid leakage remains controversial. There is no distinct treatment guideline according to the etiology in the current literature.
Methods
The records of 368 consecutive patients who underwent thoracic and/or lumbar spine surgery from 2006 throug h 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Seven cerebrospinal fluid fistulas and five pseudomeningoceles were noted in 12 (3.2%) procedures. Cerebrospinal fluid diversion by lumbar drainage in five pseudomeningoceles and over-sewing of wounds in seven cerebrospinal fluid fistulas employed in 12 patients. Clinical grading was evaluated by Wang.
Results
Of the 12 patients who had a dural tear, 5 were managed successfully with lumbar drainage, and 7 with oversewing of the wound. The clinical outcomes were excellent in 9 patients, good in 2, and poor in 1. Complications such as neurological deficits, or superficial or deep wound infections did not develop. A recurrence of the fistula or pseudomeningocele after the treatment was not seen in any of our patients.
Conclusions
Pseudomeningoceles respond well to lumbar drainage, whereas over-sewing of the wound is an alternative treatment option in cerebrospinal fluid fistulas without neurological compromise.
doi:10.4184/asj.2012.6.3.157
PMCID: PMC3429605  PMID: 22977694
Cerebrospinal; Drainage; Spinal; Primary repair; Wound Healing

Results 1-2 (2)