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1.  Knee Joint Pain Potentially Due to Bone Alterations in a Knee Osteoarthritis Patient 
Patient: Male, 83
Final Diagnosis: Osteoarthritis
Symptoms: Knee joint pain
Medication: —
Clinical Procedure: Resting
Specialty: Orthopedics and Traumatology
Objective:
Challenging differential diagnosis
Background:
Osteoarthritis (OA) is the leading cause of musculoskeletal pain and functional disability worldwide. However, the etiology of this condition is still largely unknown.
Case Report:
We report the clinical course of an elderly man with knee OA.
Conclusions:
Plain radiographs and MRI examinations performed during follow-up suggested that the pathophysiology of the patient’s knee OA and joint pain may have been primarily due to bone alterations.
doi:10.12659/AJCR.891233
PMCID: PMC4254349  PMID: 25436838
Arthralgia; Knee Joint; Magnetic Resonance Imaging
2.  Mid-Term Results of Computer-Assisted Cervical Pedicle Screw Fixation 
Asian Spine Journal  2014;8(6):759-767.
Study Design
A retrospective study.
Purpose
The present study aimed to evaluate mid-term results of cervical pedicle screw (CPS) fixation for cervical instability.
Overview of Literature
CPS fixation has widely used in the treatment of cervical spinal instability from various causes; however, there are few reports on mid-term surgical results of CPS fixation.
Methods
Record of 19 patients who underwent cervical and/or upper thoracic (C2-T1) pedicle screw fixation for cervical instability was reviewed. The mean observation period was 90.2 months. Evaluated items included Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and C2-7 lordotic angle before surgery and at 5 years after surgery. Postoperative computerized tomography was used to determine the accuracy of screw placement. Visual analog scale (VAS) for neck pain and radiological evidence of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) at the 5-year follow-up were also evaluated.
Results
Mean JOA score was significantly improved from 9.0 points before surgery to 12.8 at 5 years after surgery (p=0.001). The C2-7 lordotic angle of the neutral position improved from 6.4° to 7.8° at 5 years after surgery, but this was not significant. The major perforation rate was 5.0%. There were no clinically significant complications such as vertebral artery injury, spinal cord injury, or nerve root injury caused by any screw perforation. Mean VAS for neck pain was 49.4 at 5 years after surgery. The rate of ASD was 21.1%.
Conclusions
Our mid-term results showed that CPS fixation was useful for treating cervical instability. Severe complications were prevented with the assistance of a computed tomography-based navigation system.
doi:10.4184/asj.2014.8.6.759
PMCID: PMC4278981  PMID: 25558318
Cervical pedicle screw; Cervical instability; Mid-term results; Adjacent segment degeneration
3.  Comparison of Spinous Process-Splitting Laminectomy versus Conventional Laminectomy for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis 
Asian Spine Journal  2014;8(6):768-776.
Study Design
Seventy-five patients who had been treated for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) were reviewed retrospectively.
Purpose
Invasion into the paravertebral muscle can cause major problems after laminectomy for LSS. To address these problems, we performed spinous process-splitting laminectomy. We present a comparative study of decompression of LSS using 2 approaches.
Overview of Literature
There are no other study has investigated the lumbar spinal instability after spinous process-splitting laminectomy.
Methods
This study included 75 patients who underwent laminectomy for the treatment of LSS and who were observed through follow-ups for more than 2 years. Fifty-five patients underwent spinous process-splitting laminectomy (splitting group) and 20 patients underwent conventional laminectomy (conventional group). We evaluated the clinical and radiographic results of each surgical procedure.
Results
Japanese Orthopaedic Association score improved significantly in both groups two years postoperatively. The following values were all significantly lower, as shown with p-values, in the splitting group compared to the conventional group: average operating time (p=0.002), postoperative C-reactive protein level (p=0.006), the mean postoperative number of days until returning to normal body temperature (p=0.047), and the mean change in angulation 2 years postoperatively (p=0.007). The adjacent segment degeneration occurred in 6 patients (10.9%) in the splitting group and 11 patients (55.0%) in the conventional group.
Conclusions
In this study, the spinous process-splitting laminectomy was shown to be less invasive and more stable for patients with LSS, compared to the conventional laminectomy.
doi:10.4184/asj.2014.8.6.768
PMCID: PMC4278982  PMID: 25558319
Lumbar spinal stenosis; Spinous process-splitting laminectomy; Postoperative low back pain; Paravertebral muscle, posterior approach
4.  Myxopapillary Ependymoma of the Cauda Equina in a 5-Year-Old Boy 
Asian Spine Journal  2014;8(6):846-851.
Myxopapillary ependymoma in childhood typically occurs in the central nervous system. There are few surgical cases of myxopapillary ependymoma of the cauda equina in children. We report a case of myxopapillary ependymoma of the cauda equina in a 5-year-old boy, who presented with leg pain and abnormal gait. Subtotal resection surgery was performed. Following the subtotal tumor resection, follow-up magnetic resonance imaging evaluation showed a recurrent tumor. As a result, we performed a second subtotal tumor resection and followed with postoperative radiation therapy. No further evidence of the disease has been noted elsewhere in the patient in over ten years of follow-up. Myxopapillary ependymoma of the cauda equina in a young boy was improved by subtotal tumor resection and postoperative radiation therapy.
doi:10.4184/asj.2014.8.6.846
PMCID: PMC4278994  PMID: 25558331
Myxopapillary ependymoma; Child; Radiation therapy; Cauda equina
5.  Rapid bone destruction in a patient with knee osteoarthritis. A case report and review of the literature 
Summary
We report the clinical outcome of an elderly man with knee osteoarthritis (OA) accompanied with recurring severe joint pain. He had no history of trauma to the affected knee. Plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging uncovered rapid and severe bone deformity, which likely led to the patient’s progressed radiographic OA. These findings indicate that a pathophysiology of OA may be bone alterations.
PMCID: PMC4269149  PMID: 25568659
knee; osteoarthritis; rapid bone destruction
6.  A Case with Atypical Clinical Course Diagnosed as Osteoarthritis, Osteonecrosis, Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture, or Rapidly Destructive Coxopathy 
Osteonecrosis (ON), subchondral insufficiency fracture (SIF), and rapidly destructive coxopathy (RDC) are considered to be clinically different disorders despite exhibiting several overlapping features. We encountered an elderly female patient with an atypical clinical course who was radiographically diagnosed as having osteoarthritis (OA), ON, SIF, and/or RDC over a long-term follow-up. In this case, radiographic diagnosis was apparently affected by the timing of imaging evaluation and was challenging because of radiographic overlap and atypical disease progression. The disorders of OA, SIF, ON, and RDC might share a similar pathophysiology.
doi:10.2174/1874312901408010020
PMCID: PMC4166791  PMID: 25250098
OA; ON; RDC; SIF.
7.  The Pathophysiology and Progression of Hip Osteoarthritis Accompanied with Joint Pain are Potentially Due to Bone Alterations - Follow-up Study of Hip OA Patients 
Objectives :
This study examined hip osteoarthritis (OA) patients with joint pain and accompanying signal changes detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
Methods :
A total of 19 hip OA patients with suddenly occurring or worsening pain regardless of Kellgren-Lawrence grading were enrolled. The patients were monitored using MRI, plain radiographs, and the Denis pain scale for a minimum of 6 months. The patients were classified into 2 groups: those whose pain improved during conservative treatment (Group A) and those whose pain persisted (Group B).
Results :
Joint pain disappeared or was markedly improved in all 10 cases in Group A. Radiographic OA progression occurred in 7 of 8 cases with available radiographs. Hip MRI was performed on 7 of 10 patients, among whom bone signal changes disappeared in 6 patients. One patient exhibited persisting bone signal alterations although joint pain had completely disappeared. In Group B, joint pain remained in all 9 cases. Radiographic OA progression occurred in 8 of 9 cases, and local (4 cases) or broad (5 cases) bone signal alterations were present in end-point MRI examinations. Two patients exhibited different regional MRI bone signal changes (local or broad) at the end of follow-up. The mean age of Group B was significantly higher than that of Group A.
Conclusion :
This study uncovered the following observations: 1) hip OA with joint pain had bone alterations that were detectable by MRI, 2) these bone alterations disappeared when joint pain improved, 3) bone alterations remained when joint pain continued, and 4) radiographic OA progressed to a more advanced stage over a short time period. These findings indicate that the pathophysiology of OA, joint pain, and OA progression may primarily be due to bone changes.
doi:10.2174/1874312901408010046
PMCID: PMC4192849  PMID: 25317214
Bone alteration; hip; joint pain; MRI; OA.
9.  Stable reconstruction using halo vest for unstable upper cervical spine and occipitocervical instability 
European Spine Journal  2011;21(2):295-303.
Introduction
Upper cervical or occipitocervical disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis present as atlantoaxial subluxation, vertical subluxation of the axis, and subaxial subluxation, which produce myelopathy and severe pain. In such cases, occipitocervical reconstruction surgery may be indicated, and several reports have described reduction of subluxation by fixing the halo vest before this surgery.
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using the halo vest before the surgery for unstable upper cervical spine and for occipitocervical instability.
Methods
Twenty-eight patients (9 men and 19 women; mean age, 61.8 years at surgery) who presented with atlantoaxial or occipitocervical fusion were studied. In all cases, the halo vest was fixed in the conscious condition, and subluxation was reduced before the surgery. The mean follow-up period was 45 months. Roentgenologic measurement and clinical evaluation were performed before the surgery and at the final follow-up.
Results
Using the halo vest resulted in significant reductions in the atlantodental interval, the space available for the spinal cord, and the Ranawat value (p < 0.05), and these were maintained until the final follow-up. The mean Japanese Orthopedic Association score significantly improved from 9.5 before surgery to 12.2 at the final follow-up (p = 0.01). Nineteen cases (68%) improved by more than 1 grade by Ranawat’s classification after surgery and 16 cases (57%) maintained the same at the follow-up visit.
Conclusion
Conscious preoperative reduction using the halo vest for occipitocervical disorders is a useful and safe technique.
doi:10.1007/s00586-011-1973-5
PMCID: PMC3265589  PMID: 21833572
Occipitocervical disorders; Occipitocervical reconstruction; Halo vest
10.  The Pathophysiology of Primary Hip Osteoarthritis may Originate from Bone Alterations 
Objectives:
The aim of this study was to investigate whether bone alterations detected by hip magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were associated with subsequent primary hip OA.
Methods:
We enrolled 7 patients with hip joint pain from their first visit, at which hip joints were classified as grade 0 or I on the Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale. Plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed on all cases, and pain was assessed with the Denis pain scale. Average age, height, weight, body mass index, bone mineral density (L1-4), central edge angle, Sharp’s angle, and acetabular hip index were calculated.
Results:
Within two months of the onset of pain, 4 of the 7 cases showed broad bone signal changes, while 3 cases showed local signal changes in the proximal femur on hip MRI. Three to 6 months after the onset of pain, in all patients whose pain was much improved, plain radiographs showed progression to further-stage OA.
Conclusion:
Our findings suggest that bone abnormalities in the proximal femur might be involved in the pathogenesis of primary hip OA.
doi:10.2174/1874312920130930003
PMCID: PMC3866704  PMID: 24358070
Pathophysiology; bone; hip osteoarthritis; MRI; joint pain.
11.  Cervical Pedicle Screw Fixation Combined with Laminoplasty for Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy with Instability 
Asian Spine Journal  2012;6(4):241-248.
Study Design
A retrospective study.
Purpose
To evaluate the surgical results of cervical pedicle screw (CPS) fixation combined with laminoplasty for treating cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) with instability.
Overview of Literature
Cervical fixation and spinal cord decompression are required for CSM patients with instability. However, only a few studies have reported on CPS fixation combined with posterior decompression for unstable CSM patients.
Methods
Thirteen patients that underwent CPS fixation combined with laminoplasty for CSM with instability were evaluated in this study. We assessed the clinical and radiological results of the surgical procedures. The Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scoring system was used to evaluate the clinical results. The percentages of sli p, difference in sli p angle between maximum flexion and maximum extension of unstable intervertebrae, and perforation rate of CPS were evaluated.
Results
The mean JOA scores before surgery, immediately after surgery, and at final follow-up were 9.1, 13.3, and 12.6, respectively. The mean percentages of sli p before surgery, immediately after surgery, and at final follow-up were 9.1%, 3.2%, and 3.5%, respectively; there were significant improvements immediately after surgery and at final follow-up. The difference in sli p angle between the maximum flexion and maximum extension of the unstable intervertebrae changed from 9.0° before surgery to 1.6° at the final follow-up. The perforation rate of CPS was 10.9%.
Conclusions
The results suggest that CPS fixation combined with laminoplasty is an effective surgical procedure for treating CSM with instability.
doi:10.4184/asj.2012.6.4.241
PMCID: PMC3530698  PMID: 23275807
Cervical spondylosis; Myelopathy; Instability; Cervical fixation
12.  A Case of Pyogenic Spondylodiscitis Caused by Campylobacter fetus for Which Early Diagnosis by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Was Difficult 
Asian Spine Journal  2012;6(4):274-278.
The purpose of this case report was to report a rare case of pyogenic spondylodiscitis caused by Campylobacter fetus. A 37-year-old male presented with fever and low back pain. By lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), no abnormal finding was observed at the first presentation. However, low back pain was aggravated, and fever did not improve. Thus, lumbar MRI was repeated on the 26 day after the onset of symptoms, showing abnormal signals at vertebrae and disc spaces, and pyogenic spondylitis was diagnosed. The possibility of pyogenic spondylodiscitis should be taken into account if a patient presents with low back pain and fever, and areas of low signal intensity on a T1-weighted MRI should be carefully examined. When initial MRI does not reveal abnormal findings, repeated MRI after one or two weeks or, more favorably, immediate gadolinium enhancement MRI, are important for patients who have persistent low back pain and fever.
doi:10.4184/asj.2012.6.4.274
PMCID: PMC3530702  PMID: 23275811
Resonance imaging; Campylobacter fetus
13.  Computer-assisted C1-C2 Transarticular Screw Fixation "Magerl Technique" for Atlantoaxial Instability 
Asian Spine Journal  2012;6(3):168-177.
Study Design
A retrospective study.
Purpose
To evaluate the surgical results of computer-assisted C1-C2 transarticular screw fixation for atlantoaxial instability and the usefulness of the navigation system.
Overview of Literature
We used a computed tomography (CT)-based computer navigation system in planning and screw insertion in Magerl's procedure, which provides the most rigid atlantoaxial fusion, to avoid risk of vertebral artery (VA) tear by avoiding high-riding VA during screw insertion.
Methods
Twenty patients who underwent atlantoaxial fusion under the CT-based navigation system were studied. The mean observation period was 33.5 months. The evaluated items included the existence of VA stenosis by preoperative magnetic resonance angiography, surgical time, blood loss volume, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and Ranawat's pain criteria before surgery and at final follow-up, postoperative screw position evaluated by CT, and bony fusion.
Results
The mean operation time was 205 minutes, with the mean blood loss volume of 242 ml. The mean JOA score was 11.6 points before surgery and 13.7 at final follow-up. Occipital and/or cervical pain presented before operation was remitted or resolved in all patients. Evaluation of screw insertion by CT revealed correct penetration to atlantoaxial joints, with a perforation rate of 2.6%. There was no complication, including VA tear, and all patients who were followed-up during one year or more after surgery achieved bony fusion. Some subjects who appeared inappropriate for surgery from CT images were assessed as eligible for surgery based on the evaluation results obtained using the navigation system.
Conclusions
It was demonstrated that the CT-based navigation system is an effective support device for Magerl's procedure.
doi:10.4184/asj.2012.6.3.168
PMCID: PMC3429607  PMID: 22977696
Atlantoaxial joint; Atlantoaxial instability; CT-based computer navigation system; C1-C2 transarticular screw fixation
14.  Perforation Rates of Cervical Pedicle Screw Insertion by Disease and Vertebral Level 
Background:
Different perforation rates for cervical pedicle screws by disease are expected in relation to bone quality and pedicle morphology; however, no report comparing pedicle screw perforation rate by disease had previously been published. This study investigated the perforation rates of pedicle screws inserted to cervical pedicle by disease and vertebral level using a CT-based navigation system.
Materials/Methods:
Fifty-three patients who underwent cervical pedicle screw insertion using CT based navigation system were studied. Diseases included rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (24 cases), destructive spondyloarthropathy (DSA) (10), cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) (9), spine tumor (6), and cervical spondylotic myelopathy associated with athetoid cerebral palsy (CP) (4). Screw perforation rates for cervical pedicle screws were studied. Major perforation was defined as perforation 50% of screw diameter or more.
Results:
Major perforation rate by disease from C3 to C7 was as follows: spine tumor (0/24, 0%), RA (2/59, 3.4%), DSA (3/65, 4.6%), CP (2/20, 10.0%), and CSM (6/40, 15.0%). There were no clinically important complications such as vertebra arterial injury, spinal cord injury, or nerve root injury caused by any screw perforation. Major perforation rate by vertebral level was: C2(2/30, 6.7%), C3(4/49, 8.2%), C4(6/43, 14.0%), C5(1/32, 3.1%), C6(1/41, 2.4%), and C7(1/45, 2.2%), showing highest rate for C4, followed by C3.
Conclusions:
Cervical pedicle screw perforation rate by disease was higher in CSM compared to RA and DSA. The perforation rate by vertebral level was higher for C4 and C3, in this order.
doi:10.2174/1874325001004010142
PMCID: PMC2864428  PMID: 20448816
Cervical pedicle screw; image guidance; perforation rate.

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