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author:("kinzler, E")
1.  Breast Cancer in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus 
Oncology  2013;85(2):117-121.
Objective
Evidence points to a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a large multisite SLE cohort, linked to cancer registries.
Methods
Information on age, SLE duration, cancer date, and histology was available. We analyzed information on histological type and performed multivariate logistic regression analyses of histological types according to age, SLE duration, and calendar year.
Results
We studied 180 breast cancers in the SLE cohort. Of the 155 cases with histology information, 11 were referred to simply as ‘carcinoma not otherwise specified’. In the remaining 144 breast cancers, the most common histological type was ductal carcinoma (n = 95; 66%) followed by lobular adenocarcinoma (n = 11; 8%), 15 cancers were of mixed histology, and the remaining ones were special types. In our regression analyses, the independent risk factors for lobular versus ductal carcinoma was age [odds ratio (OR) 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01–1.14] and for the ‘special’ subtypes it was age (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.01–1.10) and SLE duration (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.00–1.11).
Conclusions
Generally, up to 80% of breast cancers are ductal carcinomas. Though our results are not definitive, in the breast cancers that occur in SLE, there may be a slight decrease in the ductal histological type. In our analyses, age and SLE duration were independent predictors of histological status.
doi:10.1159/000353138
PMCID: PMC3934367  PMID: 23887245
Breast cancer; Systemic lupus erythematosus; Histopathology; Epidemiology
4.  Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in systemic lupus erythematosus 
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases  2005;64(10):1507-1509.
Objectives: To describe demographic factors, subtypes, and survival of patients with SLE who develop NHL.
Methods: A multi-site cohort of 9547 subjects with definite SLE was assembled. Subjects at each centre were linked to regional tumour registries to determine cancer cases occurring after SLE diagnosis. For the NHL cases ascertained, descriptive statistics were calculated, and NHL subtype frequency and median survival time of patients determined.
Results: 42 cases of NHL occurred in the patients with SLE during the 76 948 patient-years of observation. The median age of patients at NHL diagnosis was 57 years. Thirty six (86%) of the 42 patients developing NHL were women, reflecting the female predominance of the cohort. In the patients, aggressive histological subtypes appeared to predominate, with the most commonly identified NHL subtype being diffuse large B cell (11 out of 21 cases for which histological subtype was available). Twenty two of the patients had died a median of 1.2 years after lymphoma diagnosis.
Conclusions: These data suggest aggressive disease in patients with SLE who develop NHL. Continuing work should provide further insight into the patterns of presentation, prognosis, and aetiology of NHL in SLE.
doi:10.1136/ard.2004.034504
PMCID: PMC1755239  PMID: 16162903
5.  Fc gamma RIIA alleles are heritable risk factors for lupus nephritis in African Americans. 
Journal of Clinical Investigation  1996;97(5):1348-1354.
Allelic variants of Fc gamma R confer distinct phagocytic capacities providing a mechanism for heritable susceptibility to immune complex disease. Human Fc gamma RIIa has two codominantly expressed alleles, R131 and H131, which differ substantially in their ability to ligate human IgG2. The Fc gamma RIIa-H131 is the only human Fc gamma R which recognizes IgG2 efficiently and optimal IgG2 handling occurs only in the homozygous state. Therefore, since immune complex clearance is essential in SLE, we hypothesized that Fc gamma RIIA genes are important disease susceptibility factors for SLE, particularly lupus nephritis. In a two-stage cross-sectional study, we compared the distribution of Fc gamma RIIA alleles in African Americans with SLE to that in African American non-SLE controls. A pilot study of 43 SLE patients and 39 controls demonstrated a skewed distribution of Fc gamma RIIA alleles, with only 9% of SLE patients homozygous for Fc gamma RIIa-H131 compared with 36% of controls (odds ratio, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.05-0.69, P = 0.009). This was confirmed with a multicenter study of 214 SLE patients and 100 non-SLE controls. The altered distribution of Fc gamma RIIA alleles was most striking in lupus nephritis. Trend analysis of the genotype distribution showed a highly significant decrease in Fc gamma RIIA-H131 as the likelihood for lupus nephritis increased (P = 0.0004) consistent with a protective effect of the Fc gamma RIIA-H131 gene. The skewing in the distribution of Fc gamma RIIA alleles identifies this gene as a risk factor with pathophysiologic importance for the SLE diathesis in African Americans.
PMCID: PMC507190  PMID: 8636449

Results 1-5 (5)