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author:("lihr, Thomas")
1.  First Molecular Cytogenetic High Resolution Characterization of the NIH 3T3 Cell Line by Murine Multicolor Banding 
Since being established in 1963, the murine fibroblast cell line NIH 3T3 has been used in thousands of studies. NIH 3T3 immortalized spontaneously and became tetraploid shortly after its establishment. Here we report the first molecular cytogenetic characterization of NIH 3T3 using fluorescence in situ hybridization based multicolor banding (mcb). Overall, a complex rearranged karyotype presenting 16 breakpoints was characterized. Also it was possible to deduce the resulting gains and losses of copy numbers in NIH 3T3. Overall, only 1.8% of the NIH 3T3 genome is disome, 26.2% tri-, 60% tetra-, 10.8% quinta-, and 1.2% hexasome. Strikingly, the cell line gained only 4 derivative chromosomes since its first cytogenetic description in 1989. An attempt to align the observed imbalances of the studied cell line with their homologous regions in humans gave the following surprising result: NIH 3T3 shows imbalances as typically seen in human solid cancers of ectodermal origin.
doi:10.1369/0022155413476868
PMCID: PMC3621507  PMID: 23321776
NIH 3T3 cell line; murine multicolor banding (mcb); cytogenetics; genetics; fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)
2.  Chromosomal Mapping of Repetitive DNAs in Triportheus trifurcatus (Characidae, Characiformes): Insights into the Differentiation of the Z and W Chromosomes 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(3):e90946.
Repetitive DNA sequences play an important role in the structural and functional organization of chromosomes, especially in sex chromosome differentiation. The genus Triportheus represents an interesting model for such studies because all of its species analyzed so far contain a ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system. A close relationship has been found between the differentiation of the W chromosome and heterochromatinization, with the involvement of different types of repetitive DNA in this process. This study investigated several aspects of this association in the W chromosome of Triportheus trifurcatus (2n = 52 chromosomes), including the cytogenetic mapping of repetitive DNAs such as telomeric sequences (TTAGGG)n, microsatellites and retrotransposons. A remarkable heterochromatic segment on the W chromosome was observed with a preferential accumulation of (CAC)10, (CAG)10, (CGG)10, (GAA)10 and (TA)15. The retrotransposons Rex1 and Rex3 showed a general distribution pattern in the chromosomes, and Rex6 showed a different distribution on the W chromosome. The telomeric repeat (TTAGGG)n was highly evident in both telomeres of all chromosomes without the occurrence of ITS. Thus, the differentiation of the W chromosome of T. trifurcatus is clearly associated with the formation of heterochromatin and different types of repetitive DNA, suggesting that these elements had a prominent role in this evolutionary process.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0090946
PMCID: PMC3954618  PMID: 24632562
3.  X chromosome aneuploidy in the Alzheimer’s disease brain 
Background
Although the link between brain aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a matter of debate, processes hallmarking cellular and tissue senescence have been repeatedly associated with its pathogenesis. Here, we have studied X chromosome aneuploidy (a recognized feature of aged cell populations) in the AD brain.
Results
Extended molecular neurocytogenetic analyses of X chromosome aneuploidy in 10 female AD as well as 10 age and sex matched female control postmortem brain samples was performed by multiprobe/quantitative FISH. Additionally, aneuploidy rate in the brain samples of 5 AD and as 5 age and sex matched control subjects were analyzed by interphase chromosome-specific multicolor banding (ICS-MCB). Totally, 182,500 cells in the AD brain and 182,500 cells in the unaffected brain were analyzed. The mean rate of X chromosome aneuploidy in AD samples was approximately two times higher than in control (control: mean - 1.32%, 95% CI 0.92- 1.71%; AD: mean - 2.79%, 95% CI 1.88-3.69; P = 0.013). One AD sample demonstrated mosaic aneuploidy of chromosome X confined to the hippocampus affecting about 10% of cells. ICS-MCB confirmed the presence of X chromosome aneuploidy in the hippocampal tissues of AD brain (control: mean - 1.74%, 95% CI 1.38- 2.10%; AD: mean - 4.92%, 95% CI 1.14-8.71; P < 0.001).
Conclusions
Addressing X chromosome number variation in the brain, we observed that somatically acquired (post-zygotic) aneuploidy causes large-scale genomic alterations in neural cells of AD patients and, therefore, can be involved in pathogenesis of this common neurodegenerative disorder. In the context of debates about possible interplay between brain aging and AD neurodegeneration, our findings suggest that X chromosome aneuploidy can contribute to both processes. To this end we conclude that mosaic aneuploidy in the brain is a new non-heritable genetic factor predisposing to AD.
doi:10.1186/1755-8166-7-20
PMCID: PMC3995993  PMID: 24602248
Alzheimer’s disease; Aneuploidy; Brain; Chromosome instability; Chromosome X; Molecular cytogenetics; Aging
4.  The strength of combined cytogenetic and mate-pair sequencing techniques illustrated by a germline chromothripsis rearrangement involving FOXP2 
Next-generation mate-pair sequencing (MPS) has revealed that many constitutional complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs) are associated with local shattering of chromosomal regions (chromothripsis). Although MPS promises to identify the molecular basis of the abnormal phenotypes associated with many CCRs, none of the reported mate-pair sequenced complex rearrangements have been simultaneously studied with state-of-the art molecular cytogenetic techniques. Here, we studied chromothripsis-associated CCR involving chromosomes 2, 5 and 7, associated with global developmental and psychomotor delay and severe speech disorder. We identified three truncated genes: CDH12, DGKB and FOXP2, confirming the role of FOXP2 in severe speech disorder, and suggestive roles of CDH12 and/or DGKB for the global developmental and psychomotor delay. Our study confirmes the power of MPS for detecting breakpoints and truncated genes at near nucleotide resolution in chromothripsis. However, only by combining MPS data with conventional G-banding and extensive fluorescence in situ hybridizations could we delineate the precise structure of the derivative chromosomes.
doi:10.1038/ejhg.2013.147
PMCID: PMC3925275  PMID: 23860044
mate-pair sequencing; complex chromosomal rearrangements; chromothripsis; FOXP2; CDH12; DGKB
5.  Monitoring of gas station attendants exposure to benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX) using three-color chromosome painting 
Background
Chronic exposure of BTX (benzene, toluene, xylene) may lead to progressive degeneration of bone marrow, aplastic anemia and/or leukemia. In Brazil there is no self-service fuel in gas stations and attendants fill the fuel themselves. Due to this they are chronically exposed to high concentration of BTX. Occupational exposure to benzene has been associated with increased chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using whole chromosome painting (wcp) probes allows the rapid detection of chromosomal aberration. In the present study three-color wcp probes for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 were used for monitoring 60 gas station attendants.
Results
Blood tests were done and interviews were conducted for each worker. For searching for possible associations between the clinical characteristics and the frequency of chromosomal aberrations the workers were divided into two groups (≤ 10 chromosomal abnormalities per 1,000 metaphases and > 10 chromosomal abnormalities per 1,000 metaphases).The studied workers had a low median age (36 year), albeit long period of BTX exposure (median was 16 years). Low prevalence of smoking and moderate consumption of alcoholic beverages were found in this population. The cytogenetic analysis showed 16.6% (10/60) of workers with a high frequency of chromosomal abnormalities (>10 chromosomal abnormalities per 1,000 metaphases). Translocations were the most frequently observed chromosome aberration. The statistical analysis revealed highly significant differences in skin color (p = 0.002) and a weak significant differences in gender (p = 0.052) distribution between the two groups.
Conclusion
16.6% of the studied population showed elevated frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities, which is highly likely to be correlated with their exposure to BTX during their work. Therefore, further studies are needed for better characterize the work associated damage of the genome in gas station workers. It is necessary to better understand the risks that these workers are exposed, so that we can be effective in preventing diseases and maintaining the health of these workers and possibly the offspring.
doi:10.1186/1755-8166-7-15
PMCID: PMC3974043  PMID: 24576355
Benzene; Toluene; Xylene; Monitoring; Cytogenetic; Painting; Chromosome
6.  Reviewer acknowledgement 2014 
Contributing reviewers
The Editors of Molecular Cytogenetics would like to thank all our reviewers who have contributed to the journal in volume 6 (2013).
doi:10.1186/1755-8166-7-11
PMCID: PMC3924429  PMID: 24529454
7.  Proximal 10q duplication in a child with severe central hypotonia characterized by array-comparative genomic hybridization: A case report and review of the literature 
Proximal 10q duplication is a well-defined but rare genetic syndrome. Duplication of proximal segments of the long arm of chromosome 10 results in a pattern of malformations, which are distinct from those of the more common distal 10q trisomy syndrome. The present study describes the case of a boy with phenotypic abnormalities (severe central hypotonia, mild ataxia, moderate developmental delay and mild dysmorphic features), due to duplication of chromosome region, 10q11.21→q11.22, which was characterized by the array-comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) technique. The phenotypic findings were compared with those in eight additional similar published cases. Major similarities have emerged, suggesting a likely minimal critical region. However, only detailed characterization of additional cases may provide firm conclusions.
doi:10.3892/etm.2014.1520
PMCID: PMC3964923  PMID: 24669257
10q duplication syndrome; array-comparative genomic hybridization; developmental delay; 10q11.21→q11.22
8.  16p11.2–p12.2 duplication syndrome; a genomic condition differentiated from euchromatic variation of 16p11.2 
Chromosome 16 contains multiple copy number variations (CNVs) that predispose to genomic disorders. Here, we differentiate pathogenic duplications of 16p11.2–p12.2 from microscopically similar euchromatic variants of 16p11.2. Patient 1 was a girl of 18 with autism, moderate intellectual disability, behavioural difficulties, dysmorphic features and a 7.71-Mb (megabase pair) duplication (16:21 521 005–29 233 146). Patient 2 had a 7.81-Mb duplication (16:21 382 561–29 191 527), speech delay and obsessional behaviour as a boy and, as an adult, short stature, macrocephaly and mild dysmorphism. The duplications contain 65 coding genes of which Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) has the highest likelihood of being haploinsufficient and, by implication, a triplosensitive gene. An additional 1.11-Mb CNV of 10q11.21 in Patient 1 was a possible modifier containing the G-protein-regulated inducer of neurite growth 2 (GPRIN2) gene. In contrast, the euchromatic variants in Patients 3 and 4 were amplifications from a 945-kb region containing non-functional immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGHV), hect domain pseudogene (HERC2P4) and TP53-inducible target gene 3 (TP53TG3) loci in proximal 16p11.2 (16:31 953 353–32 898 635). Paralogous pyrosequencing gave a total copy number of 3–8 in controls and 8 to >10 in Patients 3 and 4. The 16p11.2–p12.2 duplication syndrome is a recurrent genomic disorder with a variable phenotype including developmental delay, dysmorphic features, mild to severe intellectual disability, autism, obsessive or stereotyped behaviour, short stature and anomalies of the hands and fingers. It is important to differentiate pathogenic 16p11.2–p12.2 duplications from harmless, microscopically similar euchromatic variants of proximal 16p11.2, especially at prenatal diagnosis.
doi:10.1038/ejhg.2012.144
PMCID: PMC3548261  PMID: 22828807
chromosomes, human, pair 16; chromosome duplication; 16p11.2–p12.2; DNA array; euchromatic variant; copy number variation
9.  Uniparental disomy - clinical consequences due to imprinting and activation of recessive genes 
Molecular Cytogenetics  2014;7(Suppl 1):I21.
doi:10.1186/1755-8166-7-S1-I21
PMCID: PMC4042265  PMID: 24940361
10.  Small supernumerary marker chromosomes – an update 
Molecular Cytogenetics  2014;7(Suppl 1):I11.
doi:10.1186/1755-8166-7-S1-I11
PMCID: PMC4043994  PMID: 24940369
12.  In memoriam of Anna D Polityko (17.12.1959 — 20.04.2013) 
doi:10.1186/1755-8166-7-2
PMCID: PMC3895789  PMID: 24423091
13.  De novo acute myeloid leukemia subtype-M4 with initial trisomy 8 and later acquired t(3;12)(q26;p12) leading to ETV6/MDS1/EVI1 fusion transcript expression: A case report 
Oncology Letters  2014;7(3):787-790.
The t(3;12)(q26;p13) translocation is a recurrent chromosomal aberration observed in myeloid malignancies. The translocation results in the generation of the ETV6/myelodysplastic syndrome 1 (MDS1)/ectopic viral integration site 1 (EVI1) fusion gene. However, the present case report is the first to present this rearrangement in acute myelogeneous leukemia (AML)-M4. Notably, this case is the first report of AML-M4 with an initial trisomy 8 and secondary acquired t(3;12)(q26;p13). Cells harboring the t(3;12) translocation were found to exhibit a higher proliferative capacity than cells with pure trisomy 8, which is consistent with the role of the ETV6/MDS1/EVI1 fusion transcript in the development and progression of malignancy.
doi:10.3892/ol.2014.1784
PMCID: PMC3919885  PMID: 24527086
t(3;12)(q26;p13); ETV6/MDS1/EVI1; acute myeloid leukemia M4; trisomy 8
14.  Characterization of a rare short arm heteromorphism of chromosome 22 in a girl with down-syndrome like facies 
Chromosomal heteromorphisms are described as interindividual variation of chromosomes without phenotypic consequence. Chromosomal polymorphisms detected include most regions of heterochromatin of chromosomes 1, 9, 16 and Y and the short arms of all acrocentric chromosomes. Here, we report a girl with Down-syndrome such as facies and tremendously enlarged short arm of a chromosome 22. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a probe specific for all acrocentric short arms revealed that the enlargement p arms of the chromosome 22 in question contained exclusively heterochromatic material derived from an acrocentric short arm. Parental studies identified a maternal origin of this heteromorphism. Cryptic trisomy 21 of the Down-syndrome critical region was excluded by a corresponding FISH-probe. Here, we report, to the best of our knowledge, largest ever seen chromosome 22 short arm, being ~×1.5 larger than the normal long arm.
doi:10.4103/0971-6866.132767
PMCID: PMC4065488  PMID: 24959023
Acrocentric p arms; fluorescence in situ hybridization; heteromorphism; karyotype
15.  First detailed reconstruction of the karyotype of Trachypithecus cristatus (Mammalia: Cercopithecidae) 
Background
The chromosomal homologies of human (Homo sapiens = HSA) and silvered leaf monkey (Trachypithecus cristatus = TCR) have been previously studied by classical chromosome staining and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) applying chromosome-specific DNA probes of all human chromosomes in the 1980s and 1990s, respectively.
Results
However, as the resolution of these techniques is limited we used multicolor banding (MCB) at an ~250-band level, and other selected human DNA probes to establish a detailed chromosomal map of TCR. Therefore it was possible to precisely determine evolutionary conserved breakpoints, orientation of segments and distribution of specific regions in TCR compared to HSA. Overall, 69 evolutionary conserved breakpoints including chromosomal segments, which failed to be resolved in previous reports, were exactly identified and characterized.
Conclusions
This work also represents the first molecular cytogenetic one characterizing a multiple sex chromosome system with a male karyotype 44,XY1Y2. The obtained results are compared to other available data for old world monkeys and drawbacks in hominoid evolution are discussed.
doi:10.1186/1755-8166-6-58
PMCID: PMC3914712  PMID: 24341374
Evolutionary conserved breakpoints; Multicolor banding; Old world monkeys; XY1Y2 sex system
16.  Chromosomal abnormalities in couples with repeated fetal loss: An Indian retrospective study 
Indian Journal of Human Genetics  2013;19(4):415-422.
BACKGROUND:
Recurrent pregnancy loss is a common occurrence and a matter of concern for couples planning the pregnancy. Chromosomal abnormalities, mainly balanced rearrangements, are common in couples with repeated miscarriages.
PURPOSE:
The purpose of this study is to evaluate the contribution of chromosomal anomalies causing repeated spontaneous miscarriages and provide detailed characterization of a few structurally altered chromosomes.
MATERIALS AND METHODS:
A retrospective cytogenetic study was carried out on 4859 individuals having a history of recurrent miscarriages. The cases were analyzed using G-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization wherever necessary.
RESULTS:
Chromosomal rearrangements were found in 170 individuals (3.5%). Translocations were seen in 72 (42.35%) cases. Of these, reciprocal translocations constituted 42 (24.70%) cases while Robertsonian translocations were detected in 30 (17.64%) cases. 7 (4.11%) cases were mosaic, 8 (4.70%) had small supernumerary marker chromosomes and 1 (0.6%) had an interstitial microdeletion. Nearly, 78 (1.61%) cases with heteromorphic variants were seen of which inversion of Y chromosome (57.70%) and chromosome 9 pericentromeric variants (32.05%) were predominantly involved.
CONCLUSIONS:
Chromosomal analysis is an important etiological investigation in couples with repeated miscarriages. Characterization of variants/marker chromosome enable calculation of a more precise recurrent risk in a subsequent pregnancy thereby facilitating genetic counseling and deciding further reproductive options.
doi:10.4103/0971-6866.124369
PMCID: PMC3897136  PMID: 24497706
Break points; chromosomal abnormalities; recurrent loss of pregnancy; small supernumerary marker chromosome; translocations
19.  Acquired del(9)(p22.3) in a primary plasma cell leukemia 
Background
Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder, accounting for 1-2% of all plasma cell neoplasms, characterized by the presence of >2 × 109/l of plasma cells circulating in the peripheral blood, and exists in two forms: primary PCL (pPCL, 60% of the cases), and secondary PCL (sPCL), the latter being a leukemic transformation in patients with a previously diagnosed multiple myeloma. PCL is an aggressive disease with poor prognosis and a short median survival of 7 months.
Results
Here, we report a pPCL case with hepatosplenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, fever, fatigue, weight loss, and plasma cell count up to 60% in peripheral blood and 80% in bone marrow. Immunophenotype was compatible with PCL. A del(9)(p22.3) was characterized using banding cytogenetics and array-proven multicolor banding (aMCB), the latter being of enormous significance to characterize breakpoint regions in detail.
Conclusion
To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of pPCL associated with a partially monosomy 9pter to 9p22.3 as a sole chromosomal abnormality.
doi:10.1186/1755-8166-6-33
PMCID: PMC3765975  PMID: 23985162
Primary plasma cell leukemia; Multiple myeloma; Del(9)(p22.3); Array-proven multicolor banding; Prognostic factors
20.  A unique cytogenetic abnormality, t(2;7)(p13.1;p21.3), in a Philadelphia-positive chronic myeloid leukemia 
Oncology Letters  2012;4(2):209-212.
The Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome is present in more than 90% of patients suffering from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). It is the product of a reciprocal translocation between the long arms of chromosomes 9 and 22, resulting in the transfer of the 3′ portion of the proto-oncogene ABL from 9q34 to the 5′ portion of the breakpoint cluster region (BCR) on 22q11. Currently, most CML cases are treated with Imatinib and variant rearrangements are thought to have no specific prognostic significance, although the events of therapy resistance have not yet been studied. In this study we report a novel case of CML exhibiting an uncommon t(2;7)(p13.1;p21.3) besides t(9;22)(q34;q11). This unusual translocation has been characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and array-proven multicolor banding (aMCB), the latter being extremely significant in characterizing breakpoint regions in detail. The underlying mechanisms and prognostic implications of this cytogenetic abnormality are discussed in this study.
doi:10.3892/ol.2012.720
PMCID: PMC3402735  PMID: 22844355
chronic myeloid leukemia; ETV1; ATR1; fluorescence in situ hybridization; high resolution array-proven multicolor banding; imatinib mesylate
21.  Molecular Cytogenetics: the first impact factor (2.36) 
doi:10.1186/1755-8166-6-28
PMCID: PMC3722084  PMID: 23883569
22.  Phenotypic spectrum in uniparental disomy: Low incidence or lack of study? 
Indian Journal of Human Genetics  2013;19(3):311-314.
CONTEXT:
Alterations in the human chromosomal complement are expressed phenotypically ranging from (i) normal, via (ii) frequent fetal loss in otherwise normal person, to (iii) sub-clinical to severe mental retardation and dysmorphism in live births. A subtle and microscopically undetectable chromosomal alteration is uniparental disomy (UPD), which is known to be associated with distinct birth defects as per the chromosome involved and parental origin. UPD can be evident due to imprinted genes and/or activation of recessive mutations.
AIMS:
The present study comprises of data mining of published UPD cases with a focus on associated phenotypes. The goal was to identify non-random and recurrent associations between UPD and various genetic conditions, which can possibly indicate the presence of new imprinted genes.
SETTINGS AND DESIGN:
Data mining was carried out using the homepage “http://www.fish.uniklinikum-jena.de/UPD.html.”, an online catalog of published cases with UPD.
MATERIALS AND METHODS:
The UPD cases having normal karyotype and with or without clinical findings were selected to analyze the associated phenotypes for each chromosome, maternal or paternal involved in UPD.
RESULTS:
Our results revealed many genetic conditions (other than the known UPD syndromes) to be associated with UPD. Even in cases of bad obstetric history as well as normal individuals chance detection of UPD has been reported.
CONCLUSIONS:
The role of UPD in human genetic disorders needs to be studied by involving larger cohorts of individuals with birth defects as well as normal population. The genetic conditions were scrutinized in terms of inheritance patterns; majority of these were autosomal recessive indicating the role of UPD as an underlying mechanism.
doi:10.4103/0971-6866.120819
PMCID: PMC3841555  PMID: 24339543
Autosomal recessive; birth defects; data mining; phenotypic expression; uniparental disomy
23.  Reviewer acknowledgement 2013 
Contributing reviewers
The editors of Molecular Cytogenetics would like to thank all our reviewers who have contributed to the journal in volume 5 (2012).
doi:10.1186/1755-8166-6-9
PMCID: PMC3749808  PMID: 23587462
24.  First Molecular Cytogenetic High Resolution Characterization of the NIH 3T3 Cell Line by Murine Multicolor Banding 
Since being established in 1963, the murine fibroblast cell line NIH 3T3 has been used in thousands of studies. NIH 3T3 immortalized spontaneously and became tetraploid shortly after its establishment. Here we report the first molecular cytogenetic characterization of NIH 3T3 using fluorescence in situ hybridization based multicolor banding (mcb). Overall, a complex rearranged karyotype presenting 16 breakpoints was characterized. Also it was possible to deduce the resulting gains and losses of copy numbers in NIH 3T3. Overall, only 1.8% of the NIH 3T3 genome is disome, 26.2% tri-, 60% tetra-, 10.8% quinta-, and 1.2% hexasome. Strikingly, the cell line gained only 4 derivative chromosomes since its first cytogenetic description in 1989. An attempt to align the observed imbalances of the studied cell line with their homologous regions in humans gave the following surprising result: NIH 3T3 shows imbalances as typically seen in human solid cancers of ectodermal origin.
doi:10.1369/0022155413476868
PMCID: PMC3621507  PMID: 23321776
NIH 3T3 cell line; murine multicolor banding (mcb); cytogenetics; genetics; fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)
25.  Heteromorphic variants of chromosome 9 
Background
Heterochromatic variants of pericentromere of chromosome 9 are reported and discussed since decades concerning their detailed structure and clinical meaning. However, detailed studies are scarce. Thus, here we provide the largest ever done molecular cytogenetic research based on >300 chromosome 9 heteromorphism carriers.
Results
In this study, 334 carriers of heterochromatic variants of chromosome 9 were included, being 192 patients from Western Europe and the remainder from Easter-European origin. A 3-color-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probe-set directed against for 9p12 to 9q13~21.1 (9het-mix) and 8 different locus-specific probes were applied for their characterization. The 9het-mix enables the characterization of 21 of the yet known 24 chromosome 9 heteromorphic patterns. In this study, 17 different variants were detected including five yet unreported; the most frequent were pericentric inversions (49.4%) followed by 9qh-variants (23.9%), variants of 9ph (11.4%), cenh (8.2%), and dicentric- (3.8%) and duplication-variants (3.3%). For reasons of simplicity, a new short nomenclature for the yet reported 24 heteromorphic patterns of chromosome 9 is suggested. Six breakpoints involved in four of the 24 variants could be narrowed down using locus-specific probes.
Conclusions
Based on this largest study ever done in carriers of chromosome 9 heteromorphisms, three of the 24 detailed variants were more frequently observed in Western than in Eastern Europe. Besides, there is no clear evidence that infertility is linked to any of the 24 chromosome 9 heteromorphic variants.
doi:10.1186/1755-8166-6-14
PMCID: PMC3626942  PMID: 23547710
Chromosome 9; Heteromorphism; Breakpoints; Western Europe; Eastern Europe

Results 1-25 (74)