PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-25 (77)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
more »
Year of Publication
more »
1.  Lentiviral Delivery of a Vesicular Glutamate Transporter 1 (VGLUT1)-Targeting Short Hairpin RNA Vector Into the Mouse Hippocampus Impairs Cognition 
Neuropsychopharmacology  2013;39(2):464-476.
Glutamate is the principle excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain, and dysregulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission is implicated in the pathophysiology of several psychiatric and neurological diseases. This study utilized novel lentiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA) vectors to target expression of the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1) following injection into the dorsal hippocampus of adult mice, as partial reductions in VGLUT1 expression should attenuate glutamatergic signaling and similar reductions have been reported in schizophrenia. The VGLUT1-targeting vector attenuated tonic glutamate release in the dorsal hippocampus without affecting GABA, and selectively impaired novel object discrimination (NOD) and retention (but not acquisition) in the Morris water maze, without influencing contextual fear-motivated learning or causing any adverse locomotor or central immune effects. This pattern of cognitive impairment is consistent with the accumulating evidence for functional differentiation along the dorsoventral axis of the hippocampus, and supports the involvement of dorsal hippocampal glutamatergic neurotransmission in both spatial and nonspatial memory. Future use of this nonpharmacological VGLUT1 knockdown mouse model could improve our understanding of glutamatergic neurobiology and aid assessment of novel therapies for cognitive deficits such as those seen in schizophrenia.
doi:10.1038/npp.2013.220
PMCID: PMC3870793  PMID: 24037344
Animal models; Glutamate; Hippocampus; Learning; Learning & Memory; Memory; shRNA; Transporters; VGLUT1; VGLUT1; shRNA; hippocampus; glutamate; learning; memory
3.  Management of a Large Acetabular Chondrolabral Injury in a Young Patient With Femoroacetabular Impingement 
Arthroscopy Techniques  2014;3(6):e703-e707.
Patients with mixed-type femoroacetabular impingement syndrome often have concomitant chondrolabral pathology in addition to the characteristic cam and pincer lesions. Unfortunately, these patients are typically young, and the pathology is localized to the weight-bearing dome of the acetabulum. Complete preoperative characterization of labral and cartilage lesions is often not possible even with advanced imaging techniques, and the full extent of the injury may not be appreciated without direct arthroscopic visualization. Thus management decisions regarding intra-articular pathology may not be possible until the time of surgery. Often, the cartilage and labral pathology in these young patients is part of a contiguous complex of tissue that separates from the underlying subchondral bone. We present an arthroscopic management technique for young patients with this pattern of injury. This includes limited debridement of loose labral and chondral tissue, labral repair to restore the suction-seal effect, microfracture to promote reparative tissue formation, and takedown of the underlying pathoanatomic cam and pincer lesions.
doi:10.1016/j.eats.2014.09.008
PMCID: PMC4314555
4.  eComment. A brief appraisal 
doi:10.1093/icvts/ivt412
PMCID: PMC3829513  PMID: 24243942
5.  eComment. Further study needed 
doi:10.1093/icvts/ivt424
PMCID: PMC3829516  PMID: 24243943
7.  Consultation Content not Consultation Length Improves Patient Satisfaction 
The suggestion that increased consultation length leads to improved patient satisfaction has some evidence, albeit uncertain. Importantly there are other determinants within the doctor-patient consultation that themselves may be responsible for this improved satisfaction and it is these we investigate in this paper. A systematic review of PubMed and associated papers was carried out using search terms ‘family practice consultation length’, ‘general practice consultation length’, ‘local health authority consultation length’ and ‘primary care consultation length’. 590 papers were originally selected using these search terms, post scoring this number became 9. The results obtained support the idea that consultation length does not directly improve consultation outcome, but rather there are variables integrated within the consultation affecting this. Increased time purely allows a physician to implement management, particularly relating to psychosocial aspects.
doi:10.4103/2249-4863.148102
PMCID: PMC4311338  PMID: 25657939
Communication; consultation; patients; time
8.  Trimodality bladder-sparing approach without neoadjuvant chemotherapy for node-negative localized muscle-invasive urinary bladder cancer resulted in comparable cystectomy-free survival 
Background
To retrospectively review the efficacy and organ preservation experience for muscle-invasive bladder cancer by trimodality therapy at our institution.
Methods
Between July 2004 and February 2012, seventy patients (M/F = 55/15; median age = 69 years) of lymph node negative localized muscle-invasive bladder cancer were treated primarily with trimodality approach including transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) prior to combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy (CCRT). Radiotherapy consisted of initial large field size irradiation with 3D conformal technique (3D-CRT), followed by cone-down tumor bed boost with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique. The median total doses delivered to bladder tumor bed and whole bladder were 59.4Gy and 40.0Gy, respectively. No patient received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Weekly cisplatin was administered during radiotherapy. Toxicity was scored according to the RTOG criteria. Tumor response was evaluated both cystoscopically and radiographically 3 months after treatment.
Results
The numbers of patients with T2, T3 and T4 lesions were 41, 16 and 13, respectively. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) at 2 and 5 year were 65.7%, 51.9% and 50.8%, 39.9%, respectively, after a median follow-up time of 24 months. Local-regional control and distant metastasis free survival at 2 year were 69.8% and 73.5%, respectively. Complete response (CR) rate assessed three month after CCRT was 78.1%. Ten patients (20%) had local recurrence after initial CR (n = 50), 3 of them were superficial recurrence. One patient underwent radical cystectomy after recurrence. The overall 5-year bladder intact survival was 49.0% (95% CI, 35.5% to 62.5%). Acute toxicities were limited to grade 1-2. One patient developed late grade 3 GU toxicity.
Conclusions
Our result suggested that trimodality bladder-sparing approach without NAC or dose-intensification could be well-tolerated with a high CR rate and bladder preserving rate for muscle-invasive bladder cancer.
doi:10.1186/1748-717X-9-213
PMCID: PMC4261984  PMID: 25248470
Urinary bladder cancer; Chemoradiation; Trimodality; Organ preservation
9.  Sheep Lung Segmental Delivery Strategy Demonstrates Adenovirus Priming of Local Lung Responses to Bacterial LPS and the Role of Elafin as a Response Modulator 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(9):e107590.
Viral lung infections increase susceptibility to subsequent bacterial infection. We questioned whether local lung administration of recombinant adenoviral vectors in the sheep would alter the susceptibility of the lung to subsequent challenge with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We further questioned whether local lung expression of elafin, a locally produced alarm anti-LPS/anti-bacterial molecule, would modulate the challenge response. We established that adenoviral vector treatment primed the lung for an enhanced response to bacterial LPS. Whereas this local effect appeared to be independent of the transgene used (Ad-o-elafin or Ad-GFP), Ad-o-elafin treated sheep demonstrated a more profound lymphopenia in response to local lung administration of LPS. The local influence of elafin in modulating the response to LPS was restricted to maintaining neutrophil myeloperoxidase activity, and levels of alveolar macrophage and neutrophil phagocytosis at higher levels post-LPS. Adenoviral vector-bacterial synergism exists in the ovine lung and elafin expression modulates such synergism both locally and systemically.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0107590
PMCID: PMC4162618  PMID: 25216250
10.  Muscle Fiber Characteristics, Satellite Cells and Soccer Performance in Young Athletes 
This study is aimed to examine the muscle fiber type, composition and satellite cells in young male soccer players and to correlate them to cardiorespiratory indices and muscle strength. The participants formed three Groups: Group A (n = 13), 11.2 ± 0.4yrs, Group B (n=10), 13.1 ± 0.5yrs and Group C (n = 9), 15.2 ± 0.6yrs. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis. Peak torque values of the quadriceps and hamstrings were recorded and VO2max was measured on the treadmill. Group C had lower type I percentage distribution compared to A by 21.3% (p < 0.01), while the type IIA relative percentage was higher by 18.1% and 18.4% than in Groups A and B (p < 0.05). Groups B and C had higher cross-sectional area (CSA) values in all fiber types than in Group A (0.05 < p < 0.001). The number of satellite cells did not differ between the groups. Groups B and C had higher peak torque at all angular velocities and absolute VO2max in terms of ml·min-1 than Group A (0.05 < p < 0.001). It is concluded that the increased percentage of type IIA muscle fibers noticed in Group C in comparison to the Groups A and B should be mainly attributed to the different workload exercise and training programs. The alteration of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms composition even in children is an important mechanism for skeletal muscle characteristics. Finally, CSA, isokinetic muscle strength and VO2max values seems to be expressed according to age.
Key PointsFifteen years old soccer players have higher IIA percentage distribution than the younger players by approximately 18%.The age and the training status play a crucial role in muscle fibers co-expression.Specific training in young athletes seems to alter significantly the muscular metabolic profile.
PMCID: PMC4126283  PMID: 25177173
MHC isoforms; satellite cells; muscle fiber type; maximal oxygen uptake; isokinetic muscle strength; young soccer players
11.  Accessible knowledge for tomorrow's surgeons and doctors 
doi:10.4103/0976-3147.133661
PMCID: PMC4078641  PMID: 25002796
12.  Prostate specific antigen testing is associated with men’s psychological and physical health and their healthcare utilisation in a nationally representative sample: a cross-sectional study 
BMC Family Practice  2014;15:121.
Background
Prostate cancer incidence has risen considerably in recent years, primarily due to Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) testing in primary care. The objective of this study was to investigate associations between PSA testing and the psychological and physical health, and healthcare utilisation of men in a population where PSA testing is widespread.
Methods
A cross-sectional study was carried out in a population-representative sample of men ≥50 years enrolled in The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA). TILDA participants underwent structured interviews, health assessments and completed standardised questionnaires. Men were classified as ever/never having received a PSA test. Multivariate logistic regression (Odds Ratios (OR) and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) was used to determine associations between PSA testing, and men’s psychological and physical health and healthcare utilisation.
Results
This analysis included 3,628 men, 68.2% of whom ever had a PSA test. In adjusted analysis, men with sub-threshold depression were significantly less likely to have had a PSA test, (OR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.64-0.97). Likelihood of having a PSA test was inversely associated with anxiety, but this was not significant (OR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.57-1.09). Frailty (OR = 0.61, 95% CI 0.31-1.05) and eligibility for free primary care (OR = 0.63, 95% CI 0.52-0.77) were also inversely associated with PSA testing. Positive associations were observed between PSA testing and more chronic illnesses (OR = 1.11, 95% CI 1.05-1.19), more primary care visits (OR = 1.03, 95% CI 1.01-1.05) and preventative health practices, including cholesterol testing and influenza vaccination (OR = 1.35, 95% CI 1.13-1.60).
Conclusions
Men’s psychological and physical health and their healthcare utilisation are associated with PSA testing in primary care. The association between poorer psychological health, in particular sub-threshold depression, and reduced likelihood of PSA testing in primary care requires further investigation. These findings may have wider implications for other cancer screening.
doi:10.1186/1471-2296-15-121
PMCID: PMC4065544  PMID: 24938184
15.  Micropatterning of 3D Microenvironments for Living Biosensor Applications 
Biosensors  2014;4(1):28-44.
Micro-scale printing and patterning of living cells has multiple applications including tissue engineering, cell signaling assays, and the fabrication of cell-based biosensors. In this work, a molecular printing instrument, the Bioforce Nano eNabler, was modified to enable micron-scale —quill-pen based printing of mammalian cells in a 3D hyaluronan/gelatin based hydrogel. Specifically, photo-initiated —thiol-ene click chemistry was used to couple the thiol groups of thiolated hyaluronan/thiolated gelatin to the alkene groups of 4-arm polyethylene glycol (PEG)-norbornene molecules. Rapid photopolymerization enabled direct printing and controlled curing of living cells within the hydrogel matrix. The resulting hydrogels were biocompatible with human adipose-derived stem cells, NIH-3T3 cells, and mouse embryonic stem cells. The utility of this printing approach was also explored for cell-based biosensors. Micro-printed cells expressing a redox sensitive variant of the green fluorescent protein (roGFP-R12) showed a measurable fluorescent response to addition of oxidizing and then reducing agents. This work represents a novel approach to micron-scale cell patterning, and its potential for living, cell-based biosensors.
doi:10.3390/bios4010028
PMCID: PMC4004032  PMID: 24791214
microprinting; biosensor; hydrogel; reactive oxygen species; roGFP-R12; ROS; hyaluronan; hyaluronic acid; gelatin; PEG norbornene; Irgacure
16.  Autonomic Dysfunction in Women with Chronic Pelvic Pain 
We compared the Autonomic Symptom Profile results in 16 women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and 15 age-matched healthy subjects. Moderately severe generalized autonomic symptomology occurs in women with CPP, but not in controls. Further study including autonomic testing is needed to confirm results and explore the mechanism of dysfunction.
doi:10.1007/s10286-012-0182-6
PMCID: PMC3600066  PMID: 23229018
17.  Micropatterning of 3D Microenvironments for Living Biosensor Applications 
Biosensors  2014;4(1):28-44.
Micro-scale printing and patterning of living cells has multiple applications including tissue engineering, cell signaling assays, and the fabrication of cell-based biosensors. In this work, a molecular printing instrument, the Bioforce Nano eNabler, was modified to enable micron-scale “quill-pen” based printing of mammalian cells in a 3D hyaluronan/gelatin based hydrogel. Specifically, photo-initiated “thiol-ene” click chemistry was used to couple the thiol groups of thiolated hyaluronan/thiolated gelatin to the alkene groups of 4-arm polyethylene glycol (PEG)-norbornene molecules. Rapid photopolymerization enabled direct printing and controlled curing of living cells within the hydrogel matrix. The resulting hydrogels were biocompatible with human adipose-derived stem cells, NIH-3T3 cells, and mouse embryonic stem cells. The utility of this printing approach was also explored for cell-based biosensors. Micro-printed cells expressing a redox sensitive variant of the green fluorescent protein (roGFP-R12) showed a measurable fluorescent response to addition of oxidizing and then reducing agents. This work represents a novel approach to micron-scale cell patterning, and its potential for living, cell-based biosensors.
doi:10.3390/bios4010028
PMCID: PMC4004032  PMID: 24791214
microprinting; biosensor; hydrogel; reactive oxygen species; roGFP-R12; ROS; hyaluronan; hyaluronic acid; gelatin; PEG norbornene; Irgacure
18.  Recent progress and clinical importance on pharmacogenetics in cancer therapy 
Recent advances have provided unprecedented opportunities to identify prognostic and predictive markers of efficacy of cancer therapy. Genetic markers can be used to exclude patients who will not benefit from therapy, exclude patients at high risk of severe toxicity, and adjust dosing.
Genomic approaches for marker discovery now include genome-wide association studies and tumor DNA sequencing. The challenge is now to select markers for which there is enough evidence to transition them to the clinic.
The hurdles include the inherent low frequency of many of these markers, the lengthy validation process through trials, as well as legislative and economic hurdles. Attempts to answer questions about certain markers more quickly have led to an increased popularity of trials with enrichment design, especially in the light of the dramatic phase I results seen in recent months.
Personalized medicine in oncology is a step closer to reality.
doi:10.1515/CCLM.2011.715
PMCID: PMC3858908  PMID: 21950596
biomarkers; cancer therapy; pharmacogenetics
19.  The translational imperative: Making cell therapy simple and effective ☆ 
Acta biomaterialia  2012;8(12):4200-4207.
The current practice of cell therapy, in which multipotent or terminally differentiated cells are injected into tissues or intravenously, is inefficient. Few therapeutic cells are retained at the site of administration and engraftment is low. An injectable and biologically appropriate vehicle for delivery, retention, growth and differentiation of therapeutic cells is needed to improve the efficacy of cell therapy. We focus on a hyaluronan-based semi-synthetic extracellular matrix (sECM), HyStem®, which is a manufacturable, approvable and affordable clinical product. The composition of this sECM can be customized for use with mesenchymal stem cells as well as cells derived from embryonic or induced pluripotent sources. In addition, it can support therapeutic uses of progenitor and mature cell populations obtained from skin, fat, liver, heart, muscle, bone, cartilage, nerves and other tissues. This overview presents four pre-clinical uses of HyStem® for cell therapy to repair injured vocal folds, improve post-myocardial infarct heart function, regenerate damaged liver tissue and restore brain function following ischemic stroke. Finally, we address the real-world limitations – manufacture, regulation, market acceptance and financing – surrounding cell therapy and the development of clinical combination products.
doi:10.1016/j.actbio.2012.06.043
PMCID: PMC3488131  PMID: 22776825
HyStem®; Cell therapy; ECM; Hyaluronic acid; Cell engraftment
20.  Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma B cell-specific deficient mice have an impaired antibody response1 
Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. PPARγ, a ligand activated transcription factor, has important anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative functions and it has been associated with diseases including diabetes, scarring and atherosclerosis among others. PPARγ is expressed in most bone marrow derived cells and influences their function. PPARγ ligands can stimulate human B cell differentiation and promote antibody production. A knowledge gap is that the role of PPARγ in B cells under physiological conditions is not known. We developed a new B cell-specific PPARγ (B-PPARγ) knockout mouse and explored the role of PPARγ during both the primary and secondary immune response. Here, we show that PPARγ deficiency in B cells decreases germinal center B cells and plasma cell development as well as the levels of circulating antigen-specific antibodies during a primary challenge. Inability to generate germinal center B cells and plasma cells is correlated to decreased MHC class II expression and decreased Bcl-6 and Blimp-1 levels. Furthermore, B-PPARγ-deficient mice have an impaired memory response, characterized by low titers of antigen-specific antibodies and low numbers of antigen-experienced antibody-secreting cells. However, B-PPARγ-deficient mice have no differences in B cell population distribution within neither primary nor secondary lymphoid organs during development. This is the first report to show under physiological conditions that PPARγ expression in B cells is required for an efficient B cell-mediated immune response as it regulates B cell differentiation and antibody production.
doi:10.4049/jimmunol.1200956
PMCID: PMC3490033  PMID: 23041568
21.  In vivo stimulus-induced vasodilation occurs without IP3 receptor activation and may precede astrocytic calcium increase 
Calcium-dependent release of vasoactive gliotransmitters is widely assumed to trigger vasodilation associated with rapid increases in neuronal activity. Inconsistent with this hypothesis, intact stimulus-induced vasodilation was observed in inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) type-2 receptor (R2) knockout (KO) mice, in which the primary mechanism of astrocytic calcium increase – the release of calcium from intracellular stores following activation of an IP3-dependent pathway – is lacking. Further, our results in wild type (WT) mice indicate that in vivo onset of astrocytic calcium increase in response to sensory stimulus could be considerably delayed relative to the simultaneously measured onset of arteriolar dilation. Delayed calcium increases in WT mice were observed in both astrocytic cell bodies and perivascular endfeet. Thus, astrocytes may not play a role in the initiation of blood flow response, at least not via calcium-dependent mechanisms. Moreover, an increase in astrocytic intracellular calcium was not required for normal vasodilation in the IP3R2-KO animals.
doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3285-12.2013
PMCID: PMC3712855  PMID: 23658179
astrocyte; two-photon microscopy; blood flow; somatosensory cortex; neurovascular coupling
22.  Analyzing LC-MS/MS data by spectral count and ion abundance: two case studies 
Statistics and its interface  2012;5(1):75-87.
In comparative proteomics studies, LC-MS/MS data is generally quantified using one or both of two measures: the spectral count, derived from the identification of MS/MS spectra, or some measure of ion abundance derived from the LC-MS data. Here we contrast the performance of these measures and show that ion abundance is the more sensitive. We also examine how the conclusions of a comparative analysis are influenced by the manner in which the LC-MS/MS data is ‘rolled up’ to the protein level, and show that divergent conclusions obtained using different rollups can be informative. Our analysis is based on two publicly available reference data sets, BIATECH-54 and CPTAC, which were developed for the purpose of assessing methods used in label-free differential proteomic studies. We find that the use of the ion abundance measure reveals properties of both data sets not readily apparent using the spectral count.
doi:10.4310/SII.2012.v5.n1.a7
PMCID: PMC3806317  PMID: 24163717
mass spectrometry; comparative proteomics; ion abundance; spectral count; ion competition
24.  Proton pump inhibitors and hypomagnesemia monitoring 
doi:10.2147/IJGM.S51547
PMCID: PMC3754484  PMID: 23986645
25.  Characterization of the Pichia pastoris Protein-O-mannosyltransferase Gene Family 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(7):e68325.
The methylotrophic yeast, Pichiapastoris, is an important organism used for the production of therapeutic proteins. However, the presence of fungal-like glycans, either N-linked or O-linked, can elicit an immune response or enable the expressed protein to bind to mannose receptors, thus reducing their efficacy. Previously we have reported the elimination of β-linked glycans in this organism. In the current report we have focused on reducing the O-linked mannose content of proteins produced in P. pastoris, thereby reducing the potential to bind to mannose receptors. The initial step in the synthesis of O-linked glycans in P. pastoris is the transfer of mannose from dolichol-phosphomannose to a target protein in the yeast secretory pathway by members of the protein-O-mannosyltransferase (PMT) family. In this report we identify and characterize the members of the P. pastoris PMT family. Like Candida albicans, P. pastoris has five PMT genes. Based on sequence homology, these PMTs can be grouped into three sub-families, with both PMT1 and PMT2 sub-families possessing two members each (PMT1 and PMT5, and PMT2 and PMT6, respectively). The remaining sub-family, PMT4, has only one member (PMT4). Through gene knockouts we show that PMT1 and PMT2 each play a significant role in O-glycosylation. Both, by gene knockouts and the use of Pmt inhibitors we were able to significantly reduce not only the degree of O-mannosylation, but also the chain-length of these glycans. Taken together, this reduction of O-glycosylation represents an important step forward in developing the P. pastoris platform as a suitable system for the production of therapeutic glycoproteins.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0068325
PMCID: PMC3698189  PMID: 23840891

Results 1-25 (77)