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author:("bogaerts, K")
1.  Timeliness of syndromic influenza surveillance through work and school absenteeism 
Archives of Public Health  2010;68(3):115-120.
In this paper, we investigate the usefulness of work and school absenteeism surveillance as an early warning system for influenza. In particular, time trends in daily absenteeism rates collected during the A(H1N1)2009 pandemic are compared with weekly incidence rates of influenza-like illness (ILI) obtained from the Belgian Sentinel General Practitioner (SGP) network. The results indicate a rise in absenteeism rates prior to the onset of the influenza epidemic, suggesting that absenteeism surveillance is a promising tool for early warning of influenza epidemics. To convincingly conclude on the usefulness of absenteeism data for early warning, additional data covering several influenza seasons is needed.
doi:10.1186/0778-7367-68-3-115
PMCID: PMC3463027
School absenteeism; worker absenteeism; influenza; influenza A virus; H1N1 subtype
2.  Contribution of respiratory pathogens to influenza-like illness consultations 
Epidemiology and Infection  2012;141(10):2196-2204.
SUMMARY
Influenza-like illnesses (ILIs) are caused by several respiratory pathogens. These pathogens show weak to strong seasonal activity implying seasonality in ILI consultations. In this paper, the contribution of pathogens to seasonality of ILI consultations was statistically modelled. Virological count data were first smoothed using modulation models for seasonal time series. Second, Poisson regression was used regressing ILI consultation counts on the smoothed time series. Using ratios of the estimated regression parameters, relative measures of the underreporting of pathogens were obtained. Influenza viruses A and B, parainfluenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) significantly contributed to explain the seasonal variation in ILI consultations. We also found that RSV was the least and influenza virus A is the most underreported pathogen in Belgian laboratory surveillance. The proposed methods and results are helpful in interpreting the data of clinical and laboratory surveillance, which are the essential parts of influenza surveillance.
doi:10.1017/S0950268812002506
PMCID: PMC3757921  PMID: 23217849
Infectious disease epidemiology; influenza; statistics; surveillance system

Results 1-2 (2)