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1.  Inducible Azole Resistance Associated with a Heterogeneous Phenotype in Candida albicans 
The development of azole resistance in Candida albicans is most problematic in patients with AIDS who receive long courses of drug for therapy or prevention of oral candidiasis. Recently, the rapid development of resistance was noted in other immunosuppressed patients who developed disseminated candidiasis despite fluconazole prophylaxis. One of these series of C. albicans isolates became resistant, with an associated increase in mRNA specific for a CDR ATP-binding cassette transporter efflux pump (K. A. Marr, C. N. Lyons, T. R. Rustad, R. A. Bowden, and T. C. White, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 42:2584–2589, 1998). Here we study this series of C. albicans isolates further and examine the mechanism of azole resistance in a second series of C. albicans isolates that caused disseminated infection in a recipient of bone marrow transplantation. The susceptible isolates in both series become resistant to fluconazole after serial growth in the presence of drug, while the resistant isolates in both series become susceptible after serial transfer in the absence of drug. Population analysis of the inducible, transiently resistant isolates reveals a heterogeneous population of fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant cells. We conclude that the rapid development of azole resistance occurs by a mechanism that involves selection of a resistant clone from a heterogeneous population of cells.
doi:10.1128/AAC.45.1.52-59.2001
PMCID: PMC90239  PMID: 11120944
3.  Rapid, Transient Fluconazole Resistance in Candida albicans Is Associated with Increased mRNA Levels of CDR 
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy  1998;42(10):2584-2589.
Fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans, a cause of recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection, has recently emerged as a cause of candidiasis in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy and marrow transplantation (MT). In this study, we performed detailed molecular analyses of a series of C. albicans isolates from an MT patient who developed disseminated candidiasis caused by an azole-resistant strain 2 weeks after initiation of fluconazole prophylaxis (K. A. Marr, T. C. White, J. A. H. vanBurik, and R. A. Bowden, Clin. Infect. Dis. 25:908–910, 1997). DNA sequence analysis of the gene (ERG11) for the azole target enzyme, lanosterol demethylase, revealed no difference between sensitive and resistant isolates. A sterol biosynthesis assay revealed no difference in sterol intermediates between the sensitive and resistant isolates. Northern blotting, performed to quantify mRNA levels of genes encoding enzymes in the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway (ERG7, ERG9, and ERG11) and genes encoding efflux pumps (MDR1, ABC1, YCF, and CDR), revealed that azole resistance in this series is associated with increased mRNA levels for members of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily, CDR genes. Serial growth of resistant isolates in azole-free media resulted in an increased susceptibility to azole drugs and corresponding decreased mRNA levels for the CDR genes. These results suggest that C. albicans can become transiently resistant to azole drugs rapidly after exposure to fluconazole, in association with increased expression of ABC transporter efflux pumps.
PMCID: PMC105901  PMID: 9756759

Results 1-3 (3)