PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-9 (9)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
1.  Use of dermal-fat grafts in the post-oncological reconstructive surgery of atrophies in the zygomatic region: clinical evaluations in the patients undergone to previous radiation therapy 
Head & Face Medicine  2012;8:33.
Introduction
Grafting of autologous adipose tissue can be recommended in some cases of facial plastic surgery. Rhabdomyosarcoma is a type of cancer that can also affect the orbit. Enucleation of the eye can cause atrophy of the corresponding hemiface and decreased orbital growth.
Case report
We report a case of a female patient with a medical history of surgical enucleation of the right eyeball, who had received rhabdomyosarcoma radiation therapy in her youth. The patient presented with a depression in the right zygomatic region. We took a dermal-fat flap from the abdominal region, which had been previously treated.
Results
The surgical outcome, 48 hours, and much clearly 31 days after the surgery, revealed that the right zygomatic region had returned to its proper anatomical shape, although there were still signs of postoperative edema.
Discussion
Very damaged tissues, like those exposed to radiation therapy, are generally not suitable for grafting of adipose tissue.
Conclusions
In the described case, we achieved a technically and aesthetically satisfying result despite the patient's medical history involving several perplexities about the use of autologous dermal-fat tissues, because of prior radiation therapy exposure. The clinical case shows that even a region exposed to radiation therapy can be a valid receiving bed for dermal-fat grafting.
doi:10.1186/1746-160X-8-33
PMCID: PMC3527323  PMID: 23217096
Dermal-fat grafts; Oncological surgery; Plastic surgery
2.  Semi-open rhinoplasty: a new Maxillofacial technique 
Head & Face Medicine  2012;8:13.
Background
Rhinoplasty "open" represents a surgical technique to access to the internal structures of the nose; it is an alternative to more traditional "closed" rhinoplasty. However, both these techniques have some advantages and some disadvantages. In this work the authors describe a case that shows the steps of a new surgical technique: the “semi-open” rhinoplasty.
Methods
The "semi-open" technique is performed by making an incision to access on the mucosa of both the nostrils, and through this access we separate the cartilages of the columella from the alar cartilages, debriding them at the domus. With such access we can perform any type of rhinoplasty surgery with functional or aesthetic purposes.
Discussions
Traditional techniques have undoubtedly some advantages and some disadvantages. The "semi-open" technique has the several advantages of the open technique, and it does not involve the presence of post-surgical scars.
Conclusions
This innovative technique provides great predictability and minimal postoperative discomfort, with no aesthetic damage.
doi:10.1186/1746-160X-8-13
PMCID: PMC3411475  PMID: 22546278
Rhinoplasty; Maxillofacial technique; Plastic surgery
3.  Simple Technique for Augmentation of the Facial Soft Tissue 
The Scientific World Journal  2012;2012:262989.
Due to the request of numerous patients to improve the aspect of the perioral area in combination with other types of cosmetic and reconstructive surgery, we started to use autologous fillers. In fact, there are numerous potential fillers that can be utilized during various operations executed in many bodily areas, such as the breast, abdomen, and face. The muscular fascia as well as the dense connective tissue which the surgeon encounters in various bodily areas during some stages of the operation, in fact, can be removed and replaced both by themselves or superimposed in order to increase their thickness. The insertion of the grafts is carried out by using a needle, but other methods can also be used with the same success. The consistency of the area treated, after a few days of edema, is very similar to the host area, and the volume obtained remains uniform in time (our followup is after 24 months). The time utilized for the removal and the insertion in the chosen area was only a few minutes. The result was extremely satisfactory in all the 30 patients treated, and there was no complication or side effects.
doi:10.1100/2012/262989
PMCID: PMC3351012  PMID: 22649284
4.  Clinical case-study describing the use of skin-perichondrium-cartilage graft from the auricular concha to cover large defects of the nose 
Head & Face Medicine  2012;8:10.
Background
The composite graft from the conchal cartilage is a graft that is often used, especially in surgery on the nose, due to its capacity to resolve problems of cover and tissue deficit, arising from the removal of neoplasms or as the result of trauma, burns or following over-aggressive rhinoplasty. We have started to use skin-perichondrium-cartilage graft from the ear to cover large areas of the nose with very satisfying results as well as we describe in the reported clinical case.
Methods
The operation consisted of reconstruction of the cartilaginous nasal septum, which had previously been removed, using two vestibular labial mucosa flaps to reconstruct the mucosa, and cartilage from the ear conch for the cartilaginous septum. After this, the skin edges of the fistula were turned to recreate the inner lining of the nose and form a vascular base of wide area to accept the composite graft. The case concerns a female 74-year old patient who had undergone several oncological surgery for a relapsing basal cell carcinoma on the dorsum of the nose. The operation consisted of reconstruction of the cartilaginous nasal septum using two vestibular labial mucosa flaps to reconstruct the mucosa, and cartilage from the ear conch for the cartilaginous septum.
Results
The perichondrial cutaneous graft has shown in this surgical case very favorable peculiarities that make it usable even in facial plastic surgery.
Conclusions
We believe that the positive experience that we achieved in the use of composite grafts for the reconstruction of large areas of the nose could be interesting for others surgeons.
doi:10.1186/1746-160X-8-10
PMCID: PMC3323463  PMID: 22429738
5.  A hypothetical correlation between hyaluronic acid gel and development of cutaneous metaplastic synovial cyst 
Head & Face Medicine  2010;6:13.
Thousands of patients receive hyaluronic acid filler injections, and the effects are generally considered acceptable. The acid rarely causes cutaneous reactions, which are only occasionally reported in the literature.
The aim of the present work is to analyze a clinical case that has never been reported in the literature to our knowledge. This case is of a 26-year-old woman who presented with a cyst in the infrazygomatic region that was injected with non-animal stabilized hyaluronic acid at another centre a few months ago.
Consequently, we made an external incision to remove the neoplasm: histological examination of the capsule revealed it to be a cutaneous metaplastic synovial cyst.
doi:10.1186/1746-160X-6-13
PMCID: PMC2911420  PMID: 20633261
6.  Eyelid bags 
Eyelid bags are considered a sign of ageing, but they often appear prematurely due to the variety of causes that favor them. This brief report describes the case of a patient who was referred to us for the correction of a second degree bilateral palpebral ptosis that the patient had suffered from for several years and that in recent months had worsened to the point of interfering with vision and who, aside from modest eyelid bags, presented a massive protrusion of "preocular" fatty tissue. Despite the indication of classic blepharoplasty through a lower lid incision and, therefore, the possibility of removing excess skin, the patient opted instead only for the removal of the bulging fat. The patient's postoperative results were normal and the patient was extremely satisfied with both the correction of the ptosis and the "rejuvenating" effect of removing the protruding orbital fat in the eyelid.
doi:10.1186/1746-160X-6-9
PMCID: PMC2896342  PMID: 20565888
7.  Severe Anisocoria after Oral Surgery under General Anesthesia 
Introduction. Anisocoria indicates a difference in pupil diameter. Etiologies of this clinical manifestation usually include systemic causes as neurological or vascular disorders, and local causes as congenital iris disorders and pharmacological effects.
Case Report. We present a case of a 47-year-old man, suffering from spastic tetraparesis. After the oral surgery under general anesthesia, the patient developed severe anisocoria: in particular, a ~4mm diameter increase of the left pupil compared to the right pupil.
We performed Computed Tomography (CT) in the emergency setting, Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of the brain and Magnetic Resonance Angiography of intracranial vessels. These instrumental examinations did not show vascular or neurological diseases. The pupils returned to their physiological condition (isocoria) after about 180 minutes.
Discussion and Conclusions. Literature shows that the cases of anisocoria reported during or after oral surgery are rare occurrences, especially in cases of simple tooth extraction. Anisocoria can manifest in more or less evident forms: therefore, it is clear that knowing this clinical condition is of crucial importance for a correct and timely resolution.
PMCID: PMC2948214  PMID: 20922052
Anisocoria; Pupils reactions in Oral surgery; Emergencies in Oral Surgery.
8.  Non-syndromic multiple supernumerary teeth in a family unit with a normal karyotype: case report 
Introduction. Hyperdontia is an odontostomatologic anomaly characterized by an excess in tooth number. It seems to occur more often in patients with hereditary factors concerning this anomaly: this case represents a rare form of hyperdontia, with bilateral multiple supernumerary teeth, with evident penetrance of the phenotype in the family unit engaged in the present study. The karyotype determination excludes a pathogenesis on chromosomal basis.
Case report. A 30 years old patient came to our observation with five impacted teeth (1.8, 2.8, 3.8, 4.7 and 4.8), as well as with the presence of an impacted supernumerary tooth (distomolar 4.9). The patient was suggested to allow us to perform a radiologic screening to his two sisters aged 17 and 13 years.
The X-ray photography showed that the elder sister had nine impacted teeth; these were 1.8 - 1.9 - 2.8 - 2.9 - 2.10 - 3.8 - 3.9 - 4.8 - 4.9; while the youngest sister had four impacted teeth, that is 1.8 - 1.9 - 2.8 - 2.9.
Conclusions. The value of the present case report can be used as a paradigm for the assessment of the hereditary factors predisposing the onset of hyperdontia, and for the consequent management by oral surgeon of family units in which the odontostomatologic anomaly was detected without any syndromic forms.
PMCID: PMC2974166  PMID: 21060725
Hyperdontia; supernumerary teeth; impacted teeth.
9.  Upper eyelid reconstruction: a short report of an eyelid defect following a thermal burn 
Head & Face Medicine  2009;5:26.
While the principles of eyelid reconstruction are well-established, achieving good functional and aesthetic reconstruction remains challenging.
This communication presents a technique that we used on a young patient with an eyelid defect following a thermal burn. The patient was operated on to reconstruct the entire upper eyelid using, as a posterior lamella, a mucochondrial autologous graft taken from the ala of the nose as a tarsus and conjunctiva substitutes that were sutured to the Elevator palpebrae superioris aponeurosis and muscle. On the other hand, to reconstruct the anterior lamella, which consists of skin and muscle, the surgeons used a myocutaneous temporal flap taken from the region immediately lateral to the external canthus of the palpebral region, and which, after being isolated following a drawing of the upper eyelid to be reconstructed, was rotated and then sutured to the posterior lamella using the orbicularis oculi muscle as a pedicle.
doi:10.1186/1746-160X-5-26
PMCID: PMC2787488  PMID: 19939266

Results 1-9 (9)