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author:("xhoi, S. K.")
1.  Comparative study of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis from idiopathic hypokalemic periodic paralysis: An experience from India 
Objective:
There is paucity of reports on thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) from India. We report the patients with TPP and compare them with idiopathic hypokalemic periodic paralysis (IHPP).
Materials and Methods:
Patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP) treated during the past 11 years were evaluated retrospectively. Their demographic parameters, family history, clinical features, precipitating factors, severity of weakness, laboratory parameters and rapidity of recovery were recorded. The demographic, clinical and laboratory parameters of TPP and IHPP were compared.
Results:
During the study period, we managed 52 patients with HPP; nine (17.3%) of whom had TPP and 27 (52%) had IHPP. The demographic, precipitating factors, number of attacks and severity of limb weakness were similar between the TPP and IHPP groups, except in the IHPP group, bulbar weakness was present in four and respiratory paralysis in six, needing artificial ventilation in two patients. Serum potassium was significantly lower in TPP (2.21 ± 0.49) compared with IHPP (2.67 ± 0.59, P = 0.04). Four patients with TPP had subclinical thyrotoxicosis and two had subclinical hyperthyroidism. Rebound hyperkalemia occurred in both TPP and IHPP (three versus eight patients). The recovery was faster in IHPP (26.7 ± 15.4 h) compared with TPP (34.0 ± 14.0 h), but was statistically insignificant.
Conclusion:
TPP constitutes 17.3% of HPP, and absence of clinical features of thyrotoxicosis and subclinical hyperthyroidism in TPP is not uncommon. Clinical features, demographic profile and rebound hyperkalemia are similar in both TPP and IHPP. The serum potassium level is significantly low in the TPP compared with the IHPP group.
doi:10.4103/0972-2327.99708
PMCID: PMC3424795  PMID: 22919190
Hypokalemia; hypokalemic periodic paralysis; periodic paralysis; thyrotoxic periodic paralysis; treatment

Results 1-1 (1)