PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-8 (8)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Fetal growth parameters and birth weight: their relationship to neonatal body composition 
Objectives
The main goal was to investigate the relationship between prenatal sonographic parameters and birth weight in predicting neonatal body composition.
Methods
Standard fetal biometry and soft tissue parameters were assessed prospectively in third-trimester pregnancies using three-dimensional ultrasonography. Growth parameters included biparietal diameter (BIPARIETAL DIAMETER (BPD), head circumference (HC), abdominal circumference (AC), mid-thigh circumference and femoral diaphysis length (FDL). Soft tissue parameters included fractional arm volume (AVol) and fractional thigh volume (TVol) that were derived from 50% of the humeral or femoral diaphysis lengths, respectively. Percentage of neonatal body fat (%BF) was determined within 48 h of delivery using a pediatric air displacement plethysmography system based on principles of whole-body densitometry. Correlation and stepwise multiple linear regression analyses were performed with potential prenatal predictors and %BF as the outcome variable.
Results
Eighty-seven neonates were studies with a mean ± SD %BF of 10.6 ± 4.6%. TVol had the greatest correlation with newborn %BF of all single-parameter models. This parameter alone explained 46.1% of the variability in %BF and the best stepwise multiple linear regression model was: %BF = 0.129 (TVol) – 1.03933 (P<0.001). Birth weight similarly explained 44.7% of the variation in %BF. AC and estimated fetal weight (EFW) accounted for only 24.8% and 30.4% of the variance in %BF, respectively. Skeletal growth parameters, such as FDL (14.2%), HC (7.9%) and BPD (4.0%), contributed the least towards explaining the variance in %BF.
Conclusions
During the late third trimester of pregnancy %BF is most highly correlated with TVol. Similar to actual birth weight, this soft tissue parameter accounts for a significant improvement in explaining the variation in neonatal %BF compared with fetal AC or EFW alone.
doi:10.1002/uog.6317
PMCID: PMC3549427  PMID: 19253324
3D ultrasonography; air displacement plethysmography; fetal growth; fractional thigh volume; infant body composition; soft tissue
2.  Fractional limb volume – a soft tissue parameter of fetal body composition: validation, technical considerations and normal ranges during pregnancy 
Objectives
The main goals were to provide normal reference ranges for fractional limb volume as a new index of generalized fetal nutritional status, to evaluate the reproducibility of fractional fetal limb volume measurements during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, and to demonstrate technical considerations for this technique.
Methods
This was a prospective, cross-sectional study of gravid women during mid to late pregnancy. Fractional limb volumes were based on either 50% of humeral or femoral diaphysis length. Each partial volume was subdivided into five equidistant slices that were centered along the mid-arm or mid-thigh. Slices were traced manually to obtain fractional arm (AVol) or fractional thigh (TVol) volume. Reproducibility studies were performed, using Bland-Altman plots, to assess blinded interobserver and intraobserver measurement bias and agreement. Selected images were chosen to demonstrate technical factors for the acquisition and analysis of these parameters. Reference charts were established to describe normal ranges for AVol and TVol.
Results
Three hundred and eighty-seven subjects were scanned to include 380 AVol (range, 1.1-68.3 mL) and 378 TVol (Range, 2.0-163.2 mL) measurements between 18.0 and 42.1 weeks’ menstrual age. No gender differences were found in these soft tissue measurements (AVol, P = 0.90; TVol, P = 0.91; Mann-Whitney test). Intraobserver mean bias ± SD and 95% limits of agreement (LOA) for fractional limb volumes were: 2.2 ± 4.2% (95% LOA, −6.0 to 10.5%) for AVol and 2.0 ± 4.2% (95% LOA, −6.3 to 10.3%) for TVol. Interobserver bias and agreement were −1.9 ± 4.9% (95% LOA, −11.6 to 7.8%) for AVol and −2.0 ± 5.4% (95% LOA, −12.5 to 8.6%) for TVol. Technical factors were related to image optimization, transducer pressure, fetal movement, soft tissue compression and amniotic fluid volume.
Conclusions
Fractional limb volume assessment may improve the detection and monitoring of malnourished fetuses because this soft tissue parameter can be obtained quickly and reproducibly during mid to late pregnancy. Careful attention should be placed on technical factors that can potentially affect optimal acquisition and analysis of these volume measurements.
doi:10.1002/uog.6319
PMCID: PMC3546835  PMID: 19253340
fetal growth; fractional arm volume; fractional thigh volume; soft tissue
3.  THE USE OF INVERSION MODE AND 3D MANUAL SEGMENTATION IN VOLUME MEASUREMENT OF FETAL FLUID-FILLED STRUCTURES: COMPARISON WITH VIRTUAL ORGAN COMPUTER-AIDED ANALYSIS (VOCAL™) 
Objective
Volume measurements by three-dimensional (3D) ultrasonography are considered more accurate than those performed by two-dimensional (2D) ultrasonography. The purpose of this study was to compare the agreement of three techniques, as well as the inter- and intra-observer agreements for volume measurements of fetal fluid-filled structures.
Methods
Fifty 3D volume datasets of fetal stomachs and bladders were explored. Volume measurements were performed independently by two observers using: 1) Virtual Organ Computer-aided AnaLysis (VOCAL™); 2) inversion mode; and 3) “manual segmentation.” Reliability was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and Bland-Altman plots were generated to examine bias and agreement. The time required to complete the measurements was compared using Student’s t-test or the Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. P-values <0.025 or <0.05 were considered statistically significant wherever appropriate.
Results
All volume datasets could be measured using the three techniques. A high degree of reliability was observed between: 1) VOCAL™ and inversion mode (ICC: 0.995, 95% CI: 0.992–0.997); 2) VOCAL™ and manual segmentation (ICC: 0.997, 95% CI: 0.995–0.998); and 3) inversion mode and manual segmentation (ICC: 0.995, 95% CI: 0.992–0.997). There was good agreement between VOCAL™ and inversion mode (mean: −2.4%, 95% limits of agreement: 15.3% to −20.1%), VOCAL™ and manual segmentation (mean: −8.3%, 95% limits of agreement: 12.2% to −28.8%) as well as between inversion mode and manual segmentation (mean: 5.9%, 95% limits of agreement: −14.3% to 26%). Manual segmentation and inversion mode measurements were obtained significantly faster than those by VOCAL™.
Conclusions
Volume measurements of fetal fluid-filled structures of relatively regular shape with inversion mode and manual segmentation are feasible. Both techniques have good agreement with VOCAL™ and are significantly faster than VOCAL. Inversion mode is a reliable method for volume calculations of fluid-filled organs, whereas manual segmentation can be used when volume measurements by VOCAL™ or inversion mode are technically difficult to obtain, such as solid structures with poorly defined borders as the volume dataset is rotated, like the uterine cervix.
doi:10.1002/uog.5242
PMCID: PMC2398614  PMID: 18254130
3DUS; fetal bladder; fetal stomach; three; dimensional ultrasonography; volume measurements
4.  STANDARDISATION OF “HAB – E – BUKHAR” (Unani Medicine) 
Ancient Science of Life  1985;5(1):37-39.
‘HAB-E-BUKHAR’ – a compound drug formulation in Unani System of medicine has been analysed. The microscopic method of identification of few of its ingredients (Sath-e-gulu, Thabasheer); Quantitative analysis of Quinine sulphate, other physio-chemical contents and the T.L.C. of the drug have also been reported here.
PMCID: PMC3331439  PMID: 22557497
5.  STANDARDISATION OF DIKAMALI 
Ancient Science of Life  1984;4(2):106-109.
The gum Kidamali is an important oleoresin drug in the Indian System of Medicine. The market sample of Madras Crude drug trade has been identified as the gums of Gardenia gummifera Linn. f. of Rubiaceae. The morphology, microscopical structure of the source material, the fluorescence analysis and the chemical studies including thin layer chromatography of the drug are reported.
PMCID: PMC3331502  PMID: 22557460
6.  KUTAJA BIJA – ITS PHARMACOGNOSY 
Ancient Science of Life  1984;3(4):203-206.
Kutaja bija, Kudasappalai or Inderjou is an important seed drug in Ayurveda, Siddha and Unani Medicines. The market sample of Madras Crude drug trade has been identified in our laboratory as the seeds of Holarrhena – anti – dysenterica wall of the family Apocynaceae. The morphology, anatomy, fluorescence analysis and chemical studies of the drugs are reported.
PMCID: PMC3331573  PMID: 22557406
7.  MISKITARAMASHIA 
Ancient Science of Life  1983;3(1):27-30.
Miskitaramashia is a special single drug in Unani system of medicine and it has been identified as Lallemantia royleana (Wall) Benth. Of the family Labiacae. Its pharmacognostical characters hava also been reported here.
PMCID: PMC3331537  PMID: 22557373
8.  IDENTIFICATION OF THE INGREDIENTS IN CURNA, KVATHA CURNA LEHYA AND RASAYANA – A SIMPLE MICROSCOPIC METHOD 
Ancient Science of Life  1981;1(1):58-66.
Triphala Curna, Triphatladi Kvatha Curna, Inji Rasayanam and Manibhadra Lehya of Indian System of Medicine were examined microscopically and the methods of identifying their ingredients were reported as one of the quality control standards.
PMCID: PMC3336650  PMID: 22556462

Results 1-8 (8)