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author:("davani, Neal")
4.  Endobronchial Ultrasound–guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration Prevents Mediastinoscopies in the Diagnosis of Isolated Mediastinal Lymphadenopathy 
Rationale: Patients with isolated mediastinal lymphadenopathy (IML) are a common presentation to physicians, and mediastinoscopy is traditionally considered the “gold standard” investigation when a pathological diagnosis is required. Endobronchial ultrasound–guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is established as an alternative to mediastinoscopy in patients with lung cancer.
Objective: To determine the efficacy and health care costs of EBUS-TBNA as an alternative initial investigation to mediastinoscopy in patients with isolated IML.
Methods: Prospective multicenter single-arm clinical trial of 77 consecutive patients with IML from 5 centers between April 2009 and March 2011. All patients underwent EBUS-TBNA. If EBUS-TBNA did not provide a diagnosis, then participants underwent mediastinoscopy.
Measurements and Main Results: EBUS-TBNA prevented 87% of mediastinoscopies (95% confidence interval [CI], 77–94%; P < 0.001) but failed to provide a diagnosis in 10 patients (13%), all of whom underwent mediastinoscopy. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of EBUS-TBNA in patients with IML were 92% (95% CI, 83–95%) and 40% (95% CI, 12–74%), respectively. One patient developed a lower respiratory tract infection after EBUS-TBNA, requiring inpatient admission. The cost of the EBUS-TBNA procedure per patient was £1,382 ($2,190). The mean cost of the EBUS-TBNA strategy was £1,892 ($2,998) per patient, whereas a strategy of mediastinoscopy alone was significantly more costly at £3,228 ($5,115) per patient (P < 0.001). The EBUS-TBNA strategy is less costly than mediastinoscopy if the cost per EBUS-TBNA procedure is less than £2,718 ($4,307) per patient.
Conclusions: EBUS-TBNA is a safe, highly sensitive, and cost-saving initial investigation in patients with IML.
Clinical trial registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00932854).
doi:10.1164/rccm.201203-0393OC
PMCID: PMC3423452  PMID: 22652031
endobronchial ultrasound; mediastinal lymphadenopathy; sarcoidosis; tuberculosis; lymphoma
5.  Suitability of Endobronchial Ultrasound-guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration Specimens for Subtyping and Genotyping of Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer 
Rationale: The current management of advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) requires differentiation between squamous and nonsquamous subtypes as well as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is increasingly used for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. However, it is unclear whether cytology specimens obtained with EBUS-TBNA are suitable for the subclassification and genotyping of NSCLC.
Objectives: To determine whether cytology specimens obtained from EBUS-TBNA in routine practice are suitable for phenotyping and genotyping of NSCLC.
Methods: Cytological diagnoses from EBUS-TBNA were recorded from 774 patients with known or suspected lung cancer across five centers in the United Kingdom between 2009 and 2011.
Measurements and Main Results: The proportion of patients with a final diagnosis by EBUS-TBNA in whom subtype was classified was 77% (95% confidence interval [CI], 73–80). The rate of NSCLC not otherwise specified (NSCLC-NOS) was significantly reduced in patients who underwent immunohistochemistry (adjusted odds ratio, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.28–0.82; P = 0.016). EGFR mutation analysis was possible in 107 (90%) of the 119 patients in whom mutation analysis was requested. The sensitivity, negative predictive value, and diagnostic accuracy of EBUS-TBNA in patients with NSCLC were 88% (95% CI, 86–91), 72% (95% CI, 66–77), and 91% (95% CI, 89–93), respectively.
Conclusions: This large, multicenter, pragmatic study demonstrates that cytology samples obtained from EBUS-TBNA in routine practice are suitable for subtyping of NSCLC and EGFR mutation analysis and that the use of immunohistochemistry reduces the rate of NSCLC-NOS.
doi:10.1164/rccm.201202-0294OC
PMCID: PMC3378660  PMID: 22505743
endobronchial ultrasound; non–small cell lung cancer; adenocarcinoma; EGFR mutation; NSCLC-NOS
6.  Mediastinal staging of NSCLC with endoscopic and endobronchial ultrasound 
Mediastinal staging of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is of paramount importance. it distinguishes operable from inoperable disease, guides prognosis and allows accurate comparison of outcomes in clinical trials. Noninvasive imaging modalities for mediastinal staging include CT, PET and integrated PET-CT. Mediastinoscopy is considered the current gold standard; however, each of these techniques has limitations in sensitivity or specificity. These inadequacies mean that 10% of operations performed with curative intent in patients with NSCLC are futile, owing to inaccurate locoregional lymph-node staging. endoscopic and endobronchial ultrasound-guided mediastinal lymph-node aspiration are important and promising innovative techniques with reported sensitivities and specificities higher than standard investigations. The role of these techniques in mediastinal lymph-node staging is evolving rapidly and early data suggest that they may diminish the need for invasive surgical staging of the mediastinum. Furthermore, these are outpatient procedures that do not require general anesthesia and may be combined safely in the same sitting, for optimal accuracy of mediastinal staging. we propose a new algorithm for the diagnosis and staging of NSCLC, based on the current evidence, which incorporates endoscopic and endobronchial ultrasound as a first investigation after CT in patients with intrathoracic disease.
doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2009.39
PMCID: PMC3401685  PMID: 19390554
7.  Suitability of EBUS-TBNA Specimens for Subtyping and Genotyping of NSCLC: A Multi-Centre Study of 774 Patients 
Rationale
The current management of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) requires differentiation between squamous and non-squamous sub-types as well as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is increasingly used for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. However, it is unclear whether cytology specimens obtained with EBUS-TBNA are suitable for the sub-classification and genotyping of NSCLC.
Objectives
To determine whether cytology specimens obtained from EBUS-TBNA in routine practice are suitable for phenotyping and genotyping of NSCLC.
Methods
Cytological diagnoses from EBUS-TBNA were recorded from 774 patients with known or suspected lung cancer across 5 centres in the United Kingdom between 2009 and 2011.
Measurements and Main Results
The proportion of patients with a final diagnosis by EBUS-TBNA in whom subtype was classified was 77% (95% CI 73% - 80%). The rate of NSCLC not otherwise specified (NSCLC-NOS) was significantly reduced in patients who underwent immunohistochemistry (adjusted OR 0.50 95% CI 0.28 – 0.82, P=0.016). EGFR mutation analysis was possible in 107 (90%) of the 119 patients in whom mutation analysis was requested. The sensitivity, negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy of EBUS-TBNA in patients with NSCLC was 88% (95% CI 86% - 91%), 72% (95% CI 66% - 77%) and 91% (95% CI 89% - 93%) respectively.
Conclusions
This large multi-centre pragmatic study demonstrates that cytology samples obtained from EBUS-TBNA in routine practice are suitable for sub-typing of NSCLC and EGFR mutation analysis and that use of immunohistochemistry reduces the rate of NSCLC-NOS.
doi:10.1164/rccm.201202-0294OC
PMCID: PMC3378660  PMID: 22505743
Endobronchial ultrasound; non-small cell lung cancer; adenocarcinoma; EGFR mutation; squamous cell carcinoma; NSCLC-NOS
8.  The learning curve for EBUS-TBNA 
Thorax  2010;66(4):352-353.
doi:10.1136/thx.2010.146407
PMCID: PMC3361006  PMID: 21097815
9.  Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration for the Diagnosis of Intrathoracic Lymphadenopathy in Patients with Extrathoracic Malignancy 
Introduction
Mediastinal lymphadenopathy in patients with an extrathoracic malignancy is a common clinical scenario. Invasive sampling of intrathoracic lymph nodes may be performed by mediastinoscopy or endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is an alternative to mediastinoscopy and endoscopic ultrasound in patients with lung cancer and sarcoidosis. The utility of EBUS-TBNA in patients with extrathoracic malignancy was evaluated.
Methods
Consecutive patients who were suspected to have intrathoracic lymph node metastases from an extrathoracic malignancy underwent EBUS-TBNA. When EBUS-TBNA did not provide a specific diagnosis, patients underwent mediastinoscopy or clinical follow-up of at least 6 months duration.
Results
One hundred sixty-one patients meeting the inclusion criteria underwent EBUS-TBNA in five UK centers over a 3-year period. EBUS-TBNA diagnosed mediastinal or hilar metastases in 71 (44%) patients, new lung cancer in 20 (12%) patients, and sarcoidosis in 14 (9%) patients. The sensitivity, negative predictive value for malignancy, and overall accuracy for EBUS-TBNA were 87%, 73% and 88%, respectively. One hundred ten (68%) patients in the study had a final diagnosis of malignant intrathoracic lymphadenopathy.
Conclusion
Because of the high prevalence of alternative diagnoses, pathological evaluation is important in patients with extrathoracic malignancy and suspected mediastinal or hilar lymph node metastases. EBUS-TBNA is a safe and sensitive technique and may be considered a first-line investigation in these patients.
doi:10.1097/JTO.0b013e318223c3fe
PMCID: PMC3361007  PMID: 21792077
Endobronchial ultrasound; Mediastinal lymphadenopathy; Breast cancer; Lung cancer
10.  Combination of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration with standard bronchoscopic techniques for the diagnosis of stage I and stage II pulmonary sarcoidosis 
Respirology (Carlton, Vic.)  2011;16(3):467-472.
Background and objective
Standard bronchoscopic techniques (transbronchial lung biopsy and endobronchial biopsy) provide a diagnosis in 70% of patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis. Previous data suggest that endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has a high sensitivity in patients with sarcoidosis. The feasibility and utility of combining EBUS-TBNA with standard bronchoscopic techniques is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of combined EBUS-TBNA and standard bronchoscopic techniques in patients with suspected sarcoidosis and enlarged mediastinal or hilar lymphadenopathy.
Methods
Forty consecutive patients with suspected pulmonary sarcoidosis and enlarged mediastinal or hilar lymph nodes (radiographical stage I and stage II) underwent EBUS-TBNA followed by transbronchial biopsies and endobronchial biopsies under conscious sedation.
Results
Thirty-nine out of 40 patients successfully underwent combined EBUS-TBNA and standard bronchoscopy. Twenty-seven patients were diagnosed with sarcoidosis, eight had tuberculosis, two had reactive lymphadenopathy, two had lymphoma and one had metastatic adenocarcinoma. In patients with sarcoidosis, the sensitivity of EBUS-TBNA for detection of noncaseating granulomas was 85%, compared with a sensitivity of 35% for standard bronchoscopic techniques (P < 0.001). The diagnostic yield of combined EBUS-TBNA and bronchoscopy was 93% (P < 0.0001).
Conclusions
Combination of EBUS-TBNA with standard bronchoscopic techniques is safe and feasible, and optimizes the diagnostic yield in patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis and enlarged intrathoracic lymphadenopathy.
doi:10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.01933.x
PMCID: PMC3361303  PMID: 21261784
endobronchial ultrasound; mediastinal lymphadenopathy; sarcoidosis; transbronchial biopsy
11.  Utility of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in patients with tuberculous intrathoracic lymphadenopathy: a multicentre study 
Thorax  2011;66(10):889-893.
Background
Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has emerged as an important tool for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer but its role in the diagnosis of tuberculous intrathoracic lymphadenopathy has not been established. The aim of this study was to describe the diagnostic utility of EBUS-TBNA in patients with intrathoracic lymphadenopathy due to tuberculosis (TB).
Methods
156 consecutive patients with isolated intrathoracic TB lymphadenitis were studied across four centres over a 2-year period. Only patients with a confirmed diagnosis or unequivocal clinical and radiological response to antituberculous treatment during follow-up for a minimum of 6 months were included. All patients underwent routine clinical assessment and a CT scan prior to EBUS-TBNA. Demographic data, HIV status, pathological findings and microbiological results were recorded.
Results
EBUS-TBNA was diagnostic of TB in 146 patients (94%; 95% CI 88% to 97%). Pathological findings were consistent with TB in 134 patients (86%). Microbiological investigations yielded a positive culture of TB in 74 patients (47%) with a median time to positive culture of 16 days (range 3–84) and identified eight drug-resistant cases (5%). Ten patients (6%) did not have a specific diagnosis following EBUS; four underwent mediastinoscopy which confirmed the diagnosis of TB while six responded to empirical antituberculous therapy. There was one complication requiring an inpatient admission.
Conclusions
EBUS-TBNA is a safe and effective first-line investigation in patients with tuberculous intrathoracic lymphadenopathy.
doi:10.1136/thoraxjnl-2011-200063
PMCID: PMC3361304  PMID: 21813622
12.  Pulmonary mass in a 19-year-old male 
Thorax  2011;67(5):468-470.
doi:10.1136/thoraxjnl-2011-200732
PMCID: PMC3361305  PMID: 22106020
13.  High prevalence of malignancy in HIV-positive patients with mediastinal lymphadenopathy: A study in the era of antiretroviral therapy 
Respirology (Carlton, Vic.)  2014;19(3):339-345.
Background and objective
Mediastinal lymphadenopathy (MLN) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has a wide spectrum of aetiologies with different prognoses and treatments. The decision to pursue a histopathological diagnosis represents a clinical challenge as patients present with non-specific symptoms. This study aimed to determine the aetiology and predictive factors of MLN in a cohort of HIV-infected patients in the combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) era.
Methods
Single-centre retrospective cohort study of 217 consecutive HIV-infected patients who underwent computed tomography (CT) of the chest between January 2004 and December 2009. Fifty-two patients were identified to have MLN (>10 mm in short axis). CT images were re-reviewed by an independent radiologist blinded to the clinical information. Final diagnoses of MLN were obtained from clinical records. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify predictors of aetiology of MLN.
Results
Seventeen patients (33%) had a diagnosis of malignancy. Consolidation on CT was associated with a reduced likelihood of malignancy odds ratio (OR) 0.03 (95% confidence interval 0.002–0.422), and larger lymph nodes were associated with an increase in the odds of malignancy (OR 2.89; 95% confidence interval 1.24–6.71). CD4 count was found not to be a predictor of aetiology of MLN.
Conclusions
In the era of combination cART, opportunistic infections and malignancy remain to be the frequent causes of MLN in HIV-positive patients, but the prevalence of non-HIV related malignancy has increased compared with previous studies. Although certain findings are predictors of non-malignant disease, pathological diagnosis of MLN in HIV-positive patients should be pursued whenever possible.
SUMMARY AT A GLANCE
We evaluated radiological, laboratory and clinical data of HIV patients with MLN in the era of combination ART. Opportunistic infections and malignancy remain frequent causes of MLN in HIV-positive patients, but the prevalence of non-HIV-related malignancy has increased compared with previous studies, emphasizing the need for histological diagnosis.
doi:10.1111/resp.12241
PMCID: PMC4016741  PMID: 24471994
antiretroviral agent; computed tomography scan; human immunodeficiency virus; lymph node; mediastinum
14.  Cell migration leads to spatially distinct but clonally related airway cancer precursors 
Thorax  2014;69(6):548-557.
Background
Squamous cell carcinoma of the lung is a common cancer with 95% mortality at 5 years. These cancers arise from preinvasive lesions, which have a natural history of development progressing through increasing severity of dysplasia to carcinoma in situ (CIS), and in some cases, ending in transformation to invasive carcinoma. Synchronous preinvasive lesions identified at autopsy have been previously shown to be clonally related.
Methods
Using autofluorescence bronchoscopy that allows visual observation of preinvasive lesions within the upper airways, together with molecular profiling of biopsies using gene sequencing and loss-of-heterozygosity analysis from both preinvasive lesions and from intervening normal tissue, we have monitored individual lesions longitudinally and documented their visual, histological and molecular relationship.
Results
We demonstrate that rather than forming a contiguous field of abnormal tissue, clonal CIS lesions can develop at multiple anatomically discrete sites over time. Further, we demonstrate that patients with CIS in the trachea have invariably had previous lesions that have migrated proximally, and in one case, into the other lung over a period of 12 years.
Conclusions
Molecular information from these unique biopsies provides for the first time evidence that field cancerisation of the upper airways can occur through cell migration rather than via local contiguous cellular expansion as previously thought. Our findings urge a clinical strategy of ablating high-grade premalignant airway lesions with subsequent attentive surveillance for recurrence in the bronchial tree.
doi:10.1136/thoraxjnl-2013-204198
PMCID: PMC4033139  PMID: 24550057
Lung Cancer; Airway Epithelium

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