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1.  Regulation of T Helper Cell Subsets by Cyclooxygenases and Their Metabolites 
Cyclooxygenases and their metabolites are important regulators of inflammatory responses and play critical roles in regulating the differentiation of T helper cell subsets in inflammatory diseases. In this review, we highlight new information on regulation of T helper cell subsets by cyclooxygenases and their metabolites. Prostanoids influence cytokine production on both antigen presenting cells and T cells to regulate the differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells to Th1, Th2 and Th17 cell phenotypes. Cyclooxygenases and PGE2 generally exacerbate Th2 and Th17 phenotypes, while suppressing Th1 differentiation. Thus, cycloxygenases may play a critical role in diseases that involve immune cell dysfunction. Targeting of cyclooxygenases and their eicosanoid products may represent a new approach for treatment of inflammatory diseases, tumors and autoimmune disorders.
doi:10.1016/j.prostaglandins.2012.11.002
PMCID: PMC3620713  PMID: 23201570
Cyclooxygenases; T helper cells; Prostanoids; PGE2
2.  Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibits T Helper Cell Type 9 Differentiation during Allergic Lung Inflammation via Down-regulation of IL-17RB 
Rationale: Helper CD4+ T cell subsets, including IL-9– and IL-10–producing T helper cell type 9 (Th9) cells, exist under certain inflammatory conditions. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 play important roles in allergic lung inflammation and asthma. It is unknown whether COX-derived eicosanoids regulate Th9 cells during allergic lung inflammation.
Objectives: To determine the role of COX metabolites in regulating Th9 cell differentiation and function during allergic lung inflammation.
Methods: COX-1−/−, COX-2−/−, and wild-type (WT) mice were studied in an in vivo model of ovalbumin-induced allergic inflammation and an in vitro model of Th9 differentiation using flow cytometry, cytokine assays, confocal microscopy, real-time PCR, and immunoblotting. In addition, the role of specific eicosanoids and their receptors was examined using synthetic prostaglandins (PGs), selective inhibitors, and siRNA knockdown.
Measurements and Main Results: Experimental endpoints were not different between COX-1−/− and WT mice; however, the percentage of IL-9+ CD4+ T cells was increased in lung, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, lymph nodes, and blood of allergic COX-2−/− mice relative to WT. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid IL-9 and IL-10, serum IL-9, and lung IL-17RB levels were significantly increased in allergic COX-2−/− mice or in WT mice treated with COX-2 inhibitors. IL-9, IL-10, and IL-17RB expression in vivo was inhibited by PGD2 and PGE2, which also reduced Th9 cell differentiation of murine and human naive CD4+ T cells in vitro. Inhibition of protein kinase A significantly increased Th9 cell differentiation of naive CD4+ T cells isolated from WT mice in vitro.
Conclusions: COX-2–derived PGD2 and PGE2 regulate Th9 cell differentiation by suppressing IL-17RB expression via a protein kinase A–dependent mechanism.
doi:10.1164/rccm.201211-2073OC
PMCID: PMC3707371  PMID: 23449692
T helper cell type 9 cells; cyclooxygenase 2; asthma; prostaglandins; IL-17RB
3.  CYP2J2 Overexpression Protects against Arrhythmia Susceptibility in Cardiac Hypertrophy 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(8):e73490.
Maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy predisposes one to arrhythmia and sudden death. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)-derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) promote anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic mechanisms, and are involved in the regulation of cardiac Ca2+-, K+- and Na+-channels. To test the hypothesis that enhanced cardiac EET biosynthesis counteracts hypertrophy-induced electrical remodeling, male transgenic mice with cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of the human epoxygenase CYP2J2 (CYP2J2-TG) and wildtype littermates (WT) were subjected to chronic pressure overload (transverse aortic constriction, TAC) or β-adrenergic stimulation (isoproterenol infusion, ISO). TAC caused progressive mortality that was higher in WT (42% over 8 weeks after TAC), compared to CYP2J2-TG mice (6%). In vivo electrophysiological studies, 4 weeks after TAC, revealed high ventricular tachyarrhythmia inducibility in WT (47% of the stimulation protocols), but not in CYP2J2-TG mice (0%). CYP2J2 overexpression also enhanced ventricular refractoriness and protected against TAC-induced QRS prolongation and delocalization of left ventricular connexin-43. ISO for 14 days induced high vulnerability for atrial fibrillation in WT mice (54%) that was reduced in CYP-TG mice (17%). CYP2J2 overexpression also protected against ISO-induced reduction of atrial refractoriness and development of atrial fibrosis. In contrast to these profound effects on electrical remodeling, CYP2J2 overexpression only moderately reduced TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy and did not affect the hypertrophic response to β-adrenergic stimulation. These results demonstrate that enhanced cardiac EET biosynthesis protects against electrical remodeling, ventricular tachyarrhythmia, and atrial fibrillation susceptibility during maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0073490
PMCID: PMC3758319  PMID: 24023684
4.  Cyclooxygenase-2 Regulates Th17 Cell Differentiation during Allergic Lung Inflammation 
Rationale: Th17 cells comprise a distinct lineage of proinflammatory T helper cells that are major contributors to allergic responses. It is unknown whether cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived eicosanoids regulate Th17 cells during allergic lung inflammation.
Objectives: To determine the role of COX metabolites in regulating Th17 cell differentiation and function during allergic lung inflammation.
Methods: COX-1−/−, COX-2−/−, and wild-type mice were studied in an in vivo model of ovalbumin-induced allergic inflammation and an in vitro model of Th17 differentiation using flow cytometry, cytokine assays, confocal microscopy, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblotting. In addition, the role of specific eicosanoids and their receptors was examined using synthetic prostaglandins (PGs), selective inhibitors, and siRNA knockdown.
Measurements and Main Results: Th17 cell differentiation in lung, lymph nodes, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was significantly lower in COX-2−/− mice after ovalbumin sensitization and exposure in vivo. In vitro studies revealed significantly impaired Th17 cell differentiation of COX-2−/− naive CD4+ T cells with decreased Stat3 phosphorylation and RORγt expression. Synthetic PGF2α and PGI2 enhanced Th17 cell differentiation of COX-2−/− CD4+ T cells in vitro. The selective COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398, and PGF2α receptor and PGI2 receptor siRNA knockdown significantly decreased Th17 cell differentiation in vitro. Administration of synthetic PGs restored accumulation of Th17 cells in lungs of allergic COX-2−/− mice in vivo.
Conclusions: COX-2 is a critical regulator of Th17 cell differentiation during allergic lung inflammation via autocrine signaling of PGI2 and PGF2α through their respective cell surface receptors.
doi:10.1164/rccm.201010-1637OC
PMCID: PMC3172888  PMID: 21474648
Th17 cell; COX-2; asthma; prostaglandins; IL-17
5.  Ventilation Defects Observed with Hyperpolarized 3He Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Mouse Model of Acute Lung Injury 
Regions of diminished ventilation are often evident during functional pulmonary imaging studies, including hyperpolarized gas magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography, and computed tomography (CT). The objective of this study was to characterize the hypointense regions observed via 3He MRI in a murine model of acute lung injury. LPS at doses ranging from 15–50 μg was intratracheally administered to C57BL/6 mice under anesthesia. Four hours after exposure to either LPS or saline vehicle, mice were imaged via hyperpolarized 3He MRI. All images were evaluated to identify regions of hypointense signals. Lungs were then characterized by conventional histology, or used to obtain tissue samples from regions of normal and hypointense 3He signals and analyzed for cytokine content. The characterization of 3He MRI images identified three distinct types of hypointense patterns: persistent defects, atelectatic defects, and dorsal lucencies. Persistent defects were associated with the administration of LPS. The number of persistent defects depended on the dose of LPS, with a significant increase in mean number of defects in 30–50-μg LPS-dosed mice versus saline-treated control mice. Atelectatic defects predominated in LPS-dosed mice under conditions of low-volume ventilation, and could be reversed with deep inspiration. Dorsal lucencies were present in nearly all mice studied, regardless of the experimental conditions, including control animals that did not receive LPS. A comparison of 3He MRI with histopathology did not identify tissue abnormalities in regions of low 3He signal, with the exception of a single region of atelectasis in one mouse. Furthermore, no statistically significant differences were evident in concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, MIP-2, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (KC), TNFα, and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 between hypointense and normally ventilated lung regions in LPS-dosed mice. Thus, this study defines the anatomic, functional, and biochemical characteristics of ventilation defects associated with the administration of LPS in a murine model of acute lung injury.
doi:10.1165/rcmb.2009-0287OC
PMCID: PMC3095984  PMID: 20595465
ventilation defect; lipopolysaccharide; lung inflammation; magnetic resonance imaging; cytokines
6.  Modulation of Allergic Airway Inflammation by the Oral Pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis▿  
Infection and Immunity  2010;78(6):2488-2496.
Accumulating evidence suggests that bacteria associated with periodontal disease may exert systemic immunomodulatory effects. Although the improvement in oral hygiene practices in recent decades correlates with the increased incidence of asthma in developed nations, it is not known whether diseases of the respiratory system might be influenced by the presence of oral pathogens. The present study sought to determine whether subcutaneous infection with the anaerobic oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis exerts a regulatory effect on allergic airway inflammation. BALB/c mice sensitized and subsequently challenged with ovalbumin exhibited airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine aerosol and increased airway inflammatory cell influx and Th2 cytokine (interleukin-4 [IL-4], IL-5, and IL-13) content relative to those in nonallergic controls. Airway inflammatory cell and cytokine contents were significantly reduced by establishment of a subcutaneous infection with P. gingivalis prior to allergen sensitization, whereas serum levels of ovalbumin-specific IgE and airway responsiveness were not altered. Conversely, subcutaneous infection initiated after allergen sensitization did not alter inflammatory end points but did reduce airway responsiveness in spite of increased serum IgE levels. These data provide the first direct evidence of a regulatory effect of an oral pathogen on allergic airway inflammation and responsiveness. Furthermore, a temporal importance of the establishment of infection relative to allergen sensitization is demonstrated for allergic outcomes.
doi:10.1128/IAI.01270-09
PMCID: PMC2876545  PMID: 20308298
7.  Pharmacologic Inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2 in Influenza A Viral Infection in Mice 
PLoS ONE  2010;5(7):e11610.
Background
We previously demonstrated that cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 deficiency results in greater morbidity and inflammation, whereas COX-2 deficiency leads to reduced morbidity, inflammation and mortality in influenza infected mice.
Methodology/Principal Findings
We investigated the effects of COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors in influenza A viral infection. Mice were given a COX-1 inhibitor (SC-560), a COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) or no inhibitor beginning 2 weeks prior to influenza A viral infection (200 PFU) and throughout the course of the experiment. Body weight and temperature were measured daily as indicators of morbidity. Animals were sacrificed on days 1 and 4 post-infection and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was collected or daily mortality was recorded up to 2 weeks post-infection. Treatment with SC-560 significantly increased mortality and was associated with profound hypothermia and greater weight loss compared to celecoxib or control groups. On day 4 of infection, BAL fluid cells were modestly elevated in celecoxib treated mice compared to SC-560 or control groups. Viral titres were similar between treatment groups. Levels of TNF-α and G-CSF were significantly attenuated in the SC-560 and celecoxib groups versus control and IL-6 levels were significantly lower in BAL fluid of celecoxib treated mice versus control and versus the SC-560 group. The chemokine KC was significantly lower in SC-560 group versus control.
Conclusions/Significance
Treatment with a COX-1 inhibitor during influenza A viral infection is detrimental to the host whereas inhibition of COX-2 does not significantly modulate disease severity. COX-1 plays a critical role in controlling the thermoregulatory response to influenza A viral infection in mice.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0011610
PMCID: PMC2904706  PMID: 20657653
8.  The Epoxygenases CYP2J2 Activates the Nuclear Receptor PPARα In Vitro and In Vivo 
PLoS ONE  2009;4(10):e7421.
Background
Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are a family of three (PPARα, -β/δ, and -γ) nuclear receptors. In particular, PPARα is involved in regulation of fatty acid metabolism, cell growth and inflammation. PPARα mediates the cardiac fasting response, increasing fatty acid metabolism, decreasing glucose utilisation, and is the target for the fibrate lipid-lowering class of drugs. However, little is known regarding the endogenous generation of PPAR ligands. CYP2J2 is a lipid metabolising cytochrome P450, which produces anti-inflammatory mediators, and is considered the major epoxygenase in the human heart.
Methodology/Principal Findings
Expression of CYP2J2 in vitro results in an activation of PPAR responses with a particular preference for PPARα. The CYP2J2 products 8,9- and 11-12-EET also activate PPARα. In vitro, PPARα activation by its selective ligand induces the PPARα target gene pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)4 in cardiac tissue. In vivo, in cardiac-specific CYP2J2 transgenic mice, fasting selectively augments the expression of PDK4.
Conclusions/Significance
Our results establish that CYP2J2 produces PPARα ligands in vitro and in vivo, and suggests that lipid metabolising CYPs are prime candidates for the integration of global lipid changes to transcriptional signalling events.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0007421
PMCID: PMC2756622  PMID: 19823578
9.  Detection of Human CYP2C8, CYP2C9 and CYP2J2 in Cardiovascular Tissues 
The cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2J2 metabolize arachidonic acid to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), which are known to be vital in regulation of vascular tone and cardiovascular homeostasis. Since there is limited information regarding the relative expression of these CYP enzymes in cardiovascular tissues, this study examined the expression of CYP2C8, CYP2C9 and CYP2J2 mRNA and protein in human heart, aorta and coronary artery samples by real-time PCR, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. CYP2J2 and CYP2C9 mRNA levels were highly variable in human hearts, while CYP2C8 mRNA was present in lower abundance. CYP2J2 mRNA was approximately 103 times higher than CYP2C9 or CYP2C8 in human heart. However, CYP2C9 mRNA was more abundant than CYP2J2 or CYP2C8 in one ischemic heart. In human aorta, mean CYP2C9 mRNA levels were ~ 50 times higher than CYP2J2 and 5-fold higher than CYP2C8. In human coronary artery, mean values for CYP2C9 mRNA were ~ 2-fold higher than CYP2J2 mRNA and 6-fold higher than CYP2C8 mRNA. Immunoblotting results show relatively high levels of CYP2J2 and CYP2C8 protein in human hearts, which was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. CYP2C9 protein was also detected at high levels in one ischemic heart by immunoblotting. CYP2C9 was present at higher levels than CYPJ2 in aorta and coronary artery, while CYP2C8 protein was below the limits of detection. The expression of CYP2J2 and CYP2C8 in human heart, and CYPC9 and CYP2J2 in aorta and coronary artery is consistent with a physiological role for these enzymes in these tissues.
doi:10.1124/dmd.106.012823
PMCID: PMC2747652  PMID: 17220242
10.  Cyclooxygenase-2 Deficiency Exacerbates Bleomycin-Induced Lung Dysfunction but Not Fibrosis 
Cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived eicosanoids have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Uncertainty regarding the influence of COX-2 on experimental pulmonary fibrosis prompted us to clarify the fibrotic and functional effects of intratracheal bleomycin administration in mice genetically deficient in COX-2. Further, the effects of airway-specific COX-1 overexpression on fibrotic and functional outcomes in wild-type and COX-2 knockout mice were assessed. Equivalent increases in airway cell influx, lung collagen content, and histopathologic evidence of fibrosis were observed in wild-type and COX-2 knockout mice 21 d after bleomycin treatment, suggesting that COX-2 deficiency did not alter the extent or severity of fibrosis in this model. However, bleomycin-induced alterations in respiratory mechanics were more severe in COX-2 knockout mice than in wild-type mice, as illustrated by a greater decrease in static compliance compared with genotype-matched, saline-treated control mice (26 ± 3% versus 11 ± 4% decreases for COX-2 knockout and wild-type mice, respectively; P < 0.05). The influence of COX-1 overexpression in airway Clara cells was also examined. Whereas the fibrotic effects of bleomycin were not altered in wild-type or COX-2 knockout mice overexpressing COX-1, the exaggerated lung function decrement in bleomycin-treated COX-2 knockout mice was prevented by COX-1 overexpression and coincided with decreased airway cysteinyl leukotriene levels. Collectively, these data suggest an important regulatory role for COX-2 in the maintenance of lung function in the setting of lung fibrosis, but not in the progression of the fibrotic process per se.
doi:10.1165/rcmb.2007-0057OC
PMCID: PMC1994226  PMID: 17496151
cyclooxygenase; fibrosis; respiratory mechanics; prostaglandin; transgenic
11.  Gender Differences in Murine Airway Responsiveness and Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation1 
The roles of gender and sex hormones in lung function and disease are complex and not completely understood. The present study examined the influence of gender on lung function and respiratory mechanics in naive mice and on acute airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness induced by intratracheal LPS administration. Basal lung function characteristics did not differ between naive males and females, but males demonstrated significantly greater airway responsiveness than females following aerosolized methacholine challenge as evidenced by increased respiratory system resistance and elastance (p < 0.05). Following LPS administration, males developed more severe hypothermia and greater airway hyperresponsiveness than females (p < 0.05). Inflammatory indices including bronchoalveolar lavage fluid total cells, neutrophils, and TNF-α content were greater in males than in females 6 h following LPS administration (p < 0.05), whereas whole-lung TLR-4 protein levels did not differ among treatment groups, suggesting that differential expression of TLR-4 before or after LPS exposure did not underlie the observed inflammatory outcomes. Gonadectomy decreased airway inflammation in males but did not alter inflammation in females, whereas administration of exogenous testosterone to intact females increased their inflammatory responses to levels observed in intact males. LPS-induced airway hyperresponsiveness was also decreased in castrated males and was increased in females administered exogenous testosterone. Collectively, these data indicate that airway responsiveness in naive mice is influenced by gender, and that male mice have exaggerated airway inflammatory and functional responses to LPS compared with females. These gender differences are mediated, at least in part, by effects of androgens.
PMCID: PMC2262913  PMID: 16785560
12.  Electrophysiological Properties of Cardiomyocytes Isolated from CYP2J2 Transgenic Mice 
Molecular pharmacology  2007;72(4):1063-1073.
CYP2J2 is abundant in cardiac tissue and active in the biosynthesis of eicosanoids such as epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). To determine the effects of CYP2J2 and its eicosanoid products in the heart, we characterized the electrophysiology of single cardiomyocytes isolated from adult transgenic (Tr) mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of CYP2J2. CYP2J2 Tr cardiomyocytes had a shortened action potential. At 90% repolarization, the action potential duration (APD) was 30.6 ± 3.0 ms (n = 22) in wild-type (Wt) cells and 20.2 ± 2.3 ms (n = 19) in CYP2J2 Tr cells (p < 0.005). This shortening was probably due to enhanced maximal peak transient outward K+ currents (Ito,peak), which were 38.6 ± 2.8 and 54.4 ± 4.9 pA/pF in Wt and CYP2J2 Tr cells, respectively (p < 0.05). In contrast, the late portion of the transient outward K+ current (Ito,280ms), the slowly inactivating outward K+ current (IK,slow), and the voltage-gated Na+ current (INa) were not significantly altered in CYP2J2 Tr cells. N-Methylsulphonyl-6-(2-proparglyloxy-phenyl)hexanamide (MS-PPOH), a specific inhibitor of EET biosynthesis, significantly reduced Ito,peak and increased APD in CYP2J2 Tr cardiomyocytes but not in Wt cells. Intracellular dialysis with a monoclonal antibody against CYP2J2 also significantly reduced Ito,peak and increased APD in CYP2J2 Tr cardiomyocytes. Addition of 11,12-EET or 8-bromo-cAMP significantly reversed the MS-PPOH- or monoclonal antibody-induced changes in Ito,peak and APD in CYP2J2 Tr cells. Together, our data demonstrate that shortening of the action potential in CYP2J2 Tr cardiomyocytes is associated with enhanced Ito,peak via an EET-dependent, cAMP-mediated mechanism.
doi:10.1124/mol.107.035881
PMCID: PMC2243182  PMID: 17652182
13.  Cyclooxygenase-1 Overexpression Decreases Basal Airway Responsiveness but Not Allergic Inflammation1 
Pharmacological inhibition or genetic disruption of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 or COX-2 exacerbates the inflammatory and functional responses of the lung to environmentally relevant stimuli. To further examine the contribution of COX-derived eicosanoids to basal lung function and to allergic lung inflammation, transgenic (Tr) mice were generated in which overexpression of human COX-1 was targeted to airway epithelium. Although no differences in basal respiratory or lung mechanical parameters were observed, COX-1 Tr mice had increased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid PGE2 content compared with wild-type littermates (23.0 ± 3.6 vs 8.4 ± 1.4 pg/ml; p < 0.05) and exhibited decreased airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine. In an OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation model, comparable up-regulation of COX-2 protein was observed in the lungs of allergic wild-type and COX-1 Tr mice. Furthermore, no genotype differences were observed in allergic mice in total cell number, eosinophil content (70 vs 76% of total cells, respectively), and inflammatory cytokine content of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, or in airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine (p > 0.05). To eliminate the presumed confounding effects of COX-2 up-regulation, COX-1 Tr mice were bred into a COX-2 null background. In these mice, the presence of the COX-1 transgene did not alter allergen-induced inflammation but significantly attenuated allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, coincident with reduced airway leuko-triene levels. Collectively, these data indicate that COX-1 overexpression attenuates airway responsiveness under basal conditions but does not influence allergic airway inflammation.
PMCID: PMC2222891  PMID: 16982919
14.  Spontaneous Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Estrogen Receptor-α–deficient Mice 
Rationale: Airway hyperresponsiveness is a critical feature of asthma. Substantial epidemiologic evidence supports a role for female sex hormones in modulating lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness in humans.
Objectives: To examine the role of estrogen receptors in modulating lung function and airway responsiveness using estrogen receptor–deficient mice.
Methods: Lung function was assessed by a combination of whole-body barometric plethysmography, invasive measurement of airway resistance, and isometric force measurements in isolated bronchial rings. M2 muscarinic receptor expression was assessed by Western blotting, and function was assessed by electrical field stimulation of tracheas in the presence/absence of gallamine. Allergic airway disease was examined after ovalbumin sensitization and exposure.
Measurements and Main Results: Estrogen receptor-α knockout mice exhibit a variety of lung function abnormalities and have enhanced airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine and serotonin under basal conditions. This is associated with reduced M2 muscarinic receptor expression and function in the lungs. Absence of estrogen receptor-α also leads to increased airway responsiveness without increased inflammation after allergen sensitization and challenge.
Conclusions: These data suggest that estrogen receptor-α is a critical regulator of airway hyperresponsiveness in mice.
doi:10.1164/rccm.200509-1493OC
PMCID: PMC1899278  PMID: 17095746
lung function; asthma; hyperreactivity; M2 muscarinic receptor; estrogen receptor
15.  Cyclooxygenase-2 deficiency exacerbates bleomycin-induced lung dysfunction but not fibrosis 
Cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived eicosanoids have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Uncertainty regarding the influence of COX-2 on experimental pulmonary fibrosis prompted us to clarify the fibrotic and functional effects of intratracheal bleomycin administration in mice genetically deficient in COX-2. Further, the effects of airway-specific COX-1 overexpression on fibrotic and functional outcomes in wild type and COX-2 knockout mice were assessed. Equivalent increases in airway cell influx, lung collagen content and histopathological evidence of fibrosis were observed in wild type and COX-2 knockout mice 21 days following bleomycin treatment, suggesting that COX-2 deficiency did not alter the extent or severity of fibrosis in this model. However, bleomycin- induced alterations in respiratory mechanics were more severe in COX-2 knockout mice than in wild type mice as illustrated by a greater decrease in static compliance compared to genotype- matched, saline-treated control mice (26 ± 3% vs. 11 ± 4% decreases for COX-2 knockout and wild type mice, respectively; p<0.05). The influence of COX-1 overexpression in airway Clara cells was also examined. Whereas the fibrotic effects of bleomycin were not altered in wild type or COX-2 knockout mice overexpressing COX-1, the exaggerated lung function decrement in bleomycin-treated COX-2 knockout mice was prevented by COX-1 overexpression and coincided with decreased airway cysteinyl leukotriene levels. Collectively, these data suggest an important regulatory role for COX-2 in the maintenance of lung function in the setting of lung fibrosis, but not in the progression of the fibrotic process per se.
doi:10.1165/rcmb.2007-0057OC
PMCID: PMC1994226  PMID: 17496151
cyclooxygenase; fibrosis; respiratory mechanics; prostaglandin; transgenic
16.  Role of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase in Postischemic Recovery of Heart Contractile Function 
Circulation research  2006;99(4):442-450.
Cytochrome P450 epoxygenases metabolize arachidonic acid to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) which are converted to dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) by soluble epoxide hydrolase (Ephx2, sEH). To examine the functional role of sEH in the heart, mice with targeted disruption of the Ephx2 gene were studied. Hearts from sEH null mice have undetectable levels of sEH mRNA and protein and cannot convert EETs to DHETs. sEH null mice have normal heart anatomy and basal contractile function, but have higher fatty acid epoxide:diol ratios in plasma and cardiomyocyte cell culture media compared with wild type (WT). sEH null hearts have improved recovery of left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and less infarction compared with WT hearts after 20 minutes ischemia. Perfusion with the putative EET receptor antagonist 14,15-epoxyeicosa-5(Z)-enoic acid (10 to 100 nmol/L) before ischemia abolishes this cardioprotective phenotype. Inhibitor studies demonstrate that perfusion with phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitors wortmannin (200 nmol/L) or LY294002 (5 μmol/L), the ATP-sensitive K+ channel (KATP) inhibitor glibenclamide (1 μmol/L), the mitochondrial KATP (mitoKATP) inhibitor 5-hydroxydecanoate (100 to 200 μmol/L), or the Ca2+-sensitive K+ channel (KCa) inhibitor paxilline (10 μmol/L) abolishes the cardioprotection in sEH null hearts. Consistent with increased activation of the PI3K cascade, sEH null mice exhibit increased cardiac expression of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) phospho-protein after ischemia. Together, these data suggest that targeted disruption of sEH increases the availability of cardioprotective EETs that work by activating PI3K signaling pathways and K+ channels.
doi:10.1161/01.RES.0000237390.92932.37
PMCID: PMC2072806  PMID: 16857962
arachidonic acid; cytochrome P450; eicosanoid; ischemia/reperfusion
17.  Spontaneous Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Estrogen Receptor-α–deficient Mice 
Rationale
Airway hyperresponsiveness is a critical feature of asthma. Substantial epidemiologic evidence supports a role for female sex hormones in modulating lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness in humans.
Objectives
To examine the role of estrogen receptors in modulating lung function and airway responsiveness using estrogen receptor–deficient mice.
Methods
Lung function was assessed by a combination of whole-body barometric plethysmography, invasive measurement of airway resistance, and isometric force measurements in isolated bronchial rings. M2 muscarinic receptor expression was assessed by Western blotting, and function was assessed by electrical field stimulation of tracheas in the presence/absence of gallamine. Allergic airway disease was examined after ovalbumin sensitization and exposure.
Measurements and Main Results
Estrogen receptor-α knockout mice exhibit a variety of lung function abnormalities and have enhanced airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine and serotonin under basal conditions. This is associated with reduced M2 muscarinic receptor expression and function in the lungs. Absence of estrogen receptor-α also leads to increased airway responsiveness without increased inflammation after allergen sensitization and challenge.
Conclusions
These data suggest that estrogen receptor-α is a critical regulator of airway hyperresponsiveness in mice.
doi:10.1164/rccm.200509-1493OC
PMCID: PMC1899278  PMID: 17095746
lung function; asthma; hyperreactivity; M2 muscarinic receptor; estrogen receptor

Results 1-17 (17)