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1.  Hippocampal MR spectroscopic abnormalities in a cohort of syphilitic patients with HIV and neurosyphilis infection 
Co-infection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and neurosyphilis (NS) has become a rising trend, but the extent of brain damage associated with the concomitant infections remains unknown. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) can evaluate metabolic changes underlying early brain infections. 25 syphilitic patients (7 HIV-positive with NS; 6 HIV-positive without NS; 5 HIV-negative with NS; 7 non-HIV, non-NS) and 17 healthy controls (HC) underwent single-voxel 1H-MRS in the bilateral hippocampi. Absolute concentrations of major metabolites were measured using a 3T MRI scanner. No significant structural abnormality was detected in all patients. However, metabolic changes were found in the left hippocampus of both the HIV-positive and NS subgroups, showing significantly higher choline (Cho), creatine (Cr) and myo-inositol (mI) compared to HC. In the right hippocampus, HIV-positive subgroup showed significantly higher Cr and reduced NAA, while NS subgroup only showed significantly reduced NAA compared to HC. The non-HIV, non-NS syphilitic subgroup showed no significant difference compared to HC. Substantial metabolic changes occurred in bilateral hippocampi in HIV and NS co-infections. NAA reduction might represent early neuronal damage, while mI/Cho elevation reflects gliosis/inflammatory changes. 1H-MRS could serve as a non-invasive tool to triage patients suspected of NS for lumbar puncture in non-HIV syphilitic patients.
PMCID: PMC4299779  PMID: 25625030
HIV; neurosyphilis; co-infection; magnetic resonance spectroscopy; hippocampus
2.  Current neuroimaging techniques in Alzheimer's disease and applications in animal models 
With Alzheimer’s disease (AD) quickly becoming the most costly disease to society, and with no disease-modifying treatment currently, prevention and early detection have become key points in AD research. Important features within this research focus on understanding disease pathology, as well as finding biomarkers that can act as early indicators and trackers of disease progression or potential treatment. With the advances in neuroimaging technology and the development of new imaging techniques, the search for cheap, noninvasive, sensitive biomarkers becomes more accessible. Modern neuroimaging techniques are able to cover most aspects of disease pathology, including visualization of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, cortical atrophy, neuronal loss, vascular damage, and changes in brain biochemistry. These methods can provide complementary information, resulting in an overall picture of AD. Additionally, applying neuroimaging to animal models of AD could bring about greater understanding in disease etiology and experimental treatments whilst remaining in vivo. In this review, we present the current neuroimaging techniques used in AD research in both their human and animal applications, and discuss how this fits in to the overall goal of understanding AD.
PMCID: PMC3477739  PMID: 23133824
Alzheimer’s disease; animal models; ASL; biomarkers; MRI; MRS; neuroimaging; PET

Results 1-2 (2)