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1.  Feasibility of simultaneous PET/MR in diet-induced atherosclerotic minipig: a pilot study for translational imaging 
Novel hybrid 18-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) based positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has shown promise for characterization of atherosclerotic plaques clinically. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the method in a pre-clinical model of diet-induced atherosclerosis, based on the Göttingen minipig. Using 18F-FDG PET/MRI the goal was to develop and create a new imaging method in an in vivo animal model for translational studies of atherosclerosis. We used a strategy of multisequence MRI for optimal anatomical imaging of the abdominal aortas of the pigs (n=4): T1-weighted turbo spin-echo (T1-TSE), T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (T2-TSE) and proton density imaging with and without fat saturation. 18F-FDG PET emission data were collected from a single bed position of the abdominal aorta in 3D mode for either 10 (n=4) or 10 and 20 minutes (n=2) to measure glycolysis as given by standardized uptake values (SUV). Ex vivo en face evaluation of aortas from an atherosclerotic animal illustrated plaque distribution macroscopically, compared to a lean control animal. Although T2-TSE weighted imaging was most consistent, no one MRI sequence was preferable and superior to another for visualization and identification of the abdominal aorta. We found poor correlation between SUVs obtained from 10 and 20 minutes of reconstructed PET emission data. This can most likely be ascribed to intestinal movement. In conclusion multisequence MRI is recommended for optimal imaging of the abdominal aorta using MRI. Furthermore we found that 10 minutes of PET emission data seems adequate. This is the first study to demonstrate that the method of 18F-FDG PET/MRI is feasible in minipig models of atherosclerosis, and therefore relevant in larger prospective studies. Perspectives of the method include correlation to e.g. aortic immunohistochemistry findings and a range of genomic and proteomic analyses.
PMCID: PMC4138139  PMID: 25143863
Atherosclerosis; novel model; Göttingen minipig; positron emission tomography; magnetic resonance imaging
2.  PET/MRI for Preoperative Planning in Patients with Soft Tissue Sarcoma: A Technical Report of Two Patients 
Case Reports in Medicine  2013;2013:791078.
Clinical positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition protocols may improve the evaluation of soft tissue sarcomas (STS) prior to surgical planning. We examined two patients with lower extremity STS using a Siemens Biograph mMR PET/MRI scanner and the glucose analogue 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG). We investigated clinically relevant tumor volumes and evaluated the relations to skeletal periosteum and nerve bundles. The patient scans suggest that FDG PET/MRI improved the edge detection, and invasion of tumor tissue into important adjacent anatomical structures can be evaluated. FDG PET/MRI also provided additional information compared to conventional Gadolinium enhanced MR imaging. The findings were proven by subsequent pathological examination of the resected tumor tissue. In the future, clinical FDG PET/MRI may be an important modality for preoperative planning, including radiation therapy planning in patients with STS.
doi:10.1155/2013/791078
PMCID: PMC3867891  PMID: 24368921
3.  PET/MR in oncology: an introduction with focus on MR and future perspectives for hybrid imaging 
After more than 20 years of research, a fully integrated PET/MR scanner was launched in 2010 enabling simultaneous acquisition of PET and MR imaging. Currently, no clinical indication for combined PET/MR has been established, however the expectations are high. In this paper we will discuss some of the challenges inherent in this new technology, but focus on potential applications for simultaneous PET/MR in the field of oncology. Methods and tracers for use with the PET technology will be familiar to most readers of this journal; thus this paper aims to provide a short and basic introduction to a number of different MRI techniques, such as DWI-MR (diffusion weighted imaging MR), DCE-MR (dynamic contrast enhanced MR), MRS (MR spectroscopy) and MR for attenuation correction of PET. All MR techniques presented in this paper have shown promising results in the treatment of patients with solid tumors and could be applied together with PET increasing the amount of information about the tissues of interest. The potential clinical benefit of applying PET/MR in staging, radiotherapy planning and treatment evaluation in oncology, as well as the research perspectives for the use of PET/MR in the development of new tracers and drugs will be discussed.
PMCID: PMC3484424  PMID: 23145362
PET/MR; oncology; diagnosis; staging; therapy evaluation; radiotherapy planning; molecular imaging

Results 1-3 (3)