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1.  Genome-wide meta-analysis of observational studies shows common genetic variants associated with macronutrient intake1234 
Background: Macronutrient intake varies substantially between individuals, and there is evidence that this variation is partly accounted for by genetic variants.
Objective: The objective of the study was to identify common genetic variants that are associated with macronutrient intake.
Design: We performed 2-stage genome-wide association (GWA) meta-analysis of macronutrient intake in populations of European descent. Macronutrients were assessed by using food-frequency questionnaires and analyzed as percentages of total energy consumption from total fat, protein, and carbohydrate. From the discovery GWA (n = 38,360), 35 independent loci associated with macronutrient intake at P < 5 × 10−6 were identified and taken forward to replication in 3 additional cohorts (n = 33,533) from the DietGen Consortium. For one locus, fat mass obesity-associated protein (FTO), cohorts with Illumina MetaboChip genotype data (n = 7724) provided additional replication data.
Results: A variant in the chromosome 19 locus (rs838145) was associated with higher carbohydrate (β ± SE: 0.25 ± 0.04%; P = 1.68 × 10−8) and lower fat (β ± SE: −0.21 ± 0.04%; P = 1.57 × 10−9) consumption. A candidate gene in this region, fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), encodes a fibroblast growth factor involved in glucose and lipid metabolism. The variants in this locus were associated with circulating FGF21 protein concentrations (P < 0.05) but not mRNA concentrations in blood or brain. The body mass index (BMI)–increasing allele of the FTO variant (rs1421085) was associated with higher protein intake (β ± SE: 0.10 ± 0.02%; P = 9.96 × 10−10), independent of BMI (after adjustment for BMI, β ± SE: 0.08 ± 0.02%; P = 3.15 × 10−7).
Conclusion: Our results indicate that variants in genes involved in nutrient metabolism and obesity are associated with macronutrient consumption in humans. Trials related to this study were registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00005131 (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities), NCT00005133 (Cardiovascular Health Study), NCT00005136 (Family Heart Study), NCT00005121 (Framingham Heart Study), NCT00083369 (Genetic and Environmental Determinants of Triglycerides), NCT01331512 (InCHIANTI Study), and NCT00005487 (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis).
doi:10.3945/ajcn.112.052183
PMCID: PMC3652928  PMID: 23636237
2.  Thyroid STAtus and 6-Year Mortality in Elderly People Living in a Mildly Iodine-Deficient Area: The Aging in the Chianti Area (InCHIANTI) Study 
Objectives
The relationship between thyroid dysfunction and mortality in elderly subjects is still undefined. In this population study we tested the hypothesis that in older subjects, living in a mildly iodine-deficient area, thyroid dysfunction may be associated with increased mortality independent of potential confounders.
Design
Longitudinal study
Setting
Community-based
Participants
Total of 951 subjects aged 65 years and older
Measurements
Plasma thyrotropin (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentrations and demographic features were evaluated in participants of the Aging in the Chianti Area (InCHIANTI) study, aged 65 years or older. Participants were classified according to thyroid function test. Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for confounders were used in the analysis.
Results
A total of 819 participants were euthyroid, 83 had Subclinical hyperthyroidism (SHyper), and 29 had Subclinical hypothyroidism (SHypo). Overt Hypo- and Hyperthyroidism were found in 5 and 15 subjects, respectively. During a median of six-years of follow-up, N 210 deaths occurred (22.1 %) of which 98 (46.6%) due to cardiovascular causes. Kaplan–Meier analysis revealed higher overall mortality for SHyper (P<0.04) as compared to euthyroid subjects. After adjusting for multiple confounders, participants with SHyper (Hazard Ratio[HR]:1.65; 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.02–2.69) had significantly higher all-cause mortality than those with normal thyroid function. No significant association was found between SHyper and cardiovascular mortality.
In euthyroid subjects, TSH was found to be predictive of a reduced risk of all-cause mortality (HR: 0.76; 95% CI, 0.57–0.99)
Conclusion
SHyper is an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality in the older population. Low-normal circulating TSH should be carefully monitored in euthyroid elderly individuals.
doi:10.1111/jgs.12267
PMCID: PMC3686888  PMID: 23647402
subclinical hyperthyroidism; aging; mortality
3.  Predicting 3-year incident mobility disability in middle-aged and older adults using physical performance tests 
Objectives
To identify a standard physical performance test that can predict 3-year incident mobility disability (IMD) independent of demographics
Design
Longitudinal cohort study
Setting
Population-based older cohort
Participants
Community-living middle-aged and older persons (age: 50–85 years) without baseline mobility disability (n=622).
Measurements
Mobility disability was ascertained at baseline and at 3-year follow-up using an established self-report method: self-reported inability to walk a quarter mile without resting or inability to walk up a flight of stairs unsupported. Physical performance tests included self-selected usual gait speed, time required to complete 5 times sit-to-stand (5tSTS) and 400 m brisk walking. Demographic variables age, sex, height and weight were recorded.
Results
Overall, 13.5% participants reported 3-year IMD. Usual gait speed <1.2 m/s, requiring >13.6 seconds to complete 5tSTS and completing 400 m at <1.19m/s walking speed were highly predictive of future mobility disability independent of demographics.
Conclusions
Inability to complete 5tSTS in < 13.7 seconds can be a clinically convenient guideline for monitoring and for further assessment of middle-aged and older persons, in order to prevent or delay future mobility disability.
doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2012.10.032
PMCID: PMC3637852  PMID: 23164980
mobility; disability; aging
4.  ADVANCING AGE IS ASSOCIATED WITH GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES RESEMBLING mTOR INHIBITION: EVIDENCE FROM TWO HUMAN POPULATIONS 
Interventions which inhibit TOR activity (including rapamycin and caloric restriction) lead to downstream gene expression changes and increased lifespan in laboratory models. However, the role of mTOR signaling in human aging is unclear.
We tested the expression of mTOR-related transcripts in two independent study cohorts; the InCHIANTI population study of aging and the San Antonio Family Heart Study (SAFHS). Expression of 27/56 (InCHIANTI) and 19/44 (SAFHS) genes were associated with age after correction for multiple testing. 8 genes were robustly associated with age in both cohorts. Genes involved in insulin signaling (PTEN, PI3K, PDK1), ribosomal biogenesis (S6K), lipid metabolism (SREBF1), cellular apoptosis (SGK1), angiogenesis (VEGFB), insulin production and sensitivity (FOXO), cellular stress response (HIF1A) and cytoskeletal remodeling (PKC) were inversely correlated with age, whereas genes relating to inhibition of ribosomal components (4EBP1) and inflammatory mediators (STAT3) were positively associated with age in one or both datasets.
We conclude that the expression of mTOR-related transcripts is associated with advancing age in humans. Changes seen are broadly similar to mTOR inhibition interventions associated with increased lifespan in animals. Work is needed to establish whether these changes are predictive of human longevity and whether further mTOR inhibition would be beneficial in older people.
doi:10.1016/j.mad.2012.07.003
PMCID: PMC3998676  PMID: 22813852
Aging; aging mechanisms; mTOR; human population
5.  Diabetes, Peripheral Neuropathy, and Lower Extremity Function 
Objective
Diabetes among older adults causes many complications, including decreased lower extremity function and physical disability. Diabetes can cause peripheral nerve dysfunction, which might be one pathway through which diabetes leads to decreased physical function. The study aims were to determine: (1) whether diabetes and impaired fasting glucose are associated with objective measures of physical function in older adults, (2) which peripheral nerve function (PNF) tests are associated with diabetes, and (3) whether PNF mediates the diabetes-physical function relationship.
Research Design and Methods
This study included 983 participants, age 65 and older from the InCHIANTI Study. Diabetes was diagnosed by clinical guidelines. Physical performance was assessed using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), scored from 0-12 (higher values, better physical function) and usual walking speed (m/s). PNF was assessed via standard surface electroneurographic study of right peroneal nerve conduction velocity, vibration and touch sensitivity. Clinical cut-points of PNF tests were used to create a neuropathy score from 0-5 (higher values, greater neuropathy). Multiple linear regression models were used to test associations.
Results and Conclusion
12.8% (n=126) of participants had diabetes. Adjusting for age, sex, education, and other confounders, diabetic participants had decreased SPPB (β= −0.99; p< 0.01), decreased walking speed (β= −0.1m/s; p< 0.01), decreased nerve conduction velocity (β= −1.7m/s; p< 0.01), and increased neuropathy (β= 0.25; p< 0.01) compared to non-diabetic participants. Adjusting for nerve conduction velocity and neuropathy score decreased the effect of diabetes on SPPB by 20%, suggesting partial mediation through decreased PNF.
doi:10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2013.08.007
PMCID: PMC3987662  PMID: 24120281
6.  A Genome-Wide Association Study of Depressive Symptoms 
Hek, Karin | Demirkan, Ayse | Lahti, Jari | Terracciano, Antonio | Teumer, Alexander | Cornelis, Marilyn C. | Amin, Najaf | Bakshis, Erin | Baumert, Jens | Ding, Jingzhong | Liu, Yongmei | Marciante, Kristin | Meirelles, Osorio | Nalls, Michael A. | Sun, Yan V. | Vogelzangs, Nicole | Yu, Lei | Bandinelli, Stefania | Benjamin, Emelia J. | Bennett, David A. | Boomsma, Dorret | Cannas, Alessandra | Coker, Laura H. | de Geus, Eco | De Jager, Philip L. | Diez-Roux, Ana V. | Purcell, Shaun | Hu, Frank B. | Rimma, Eric B. | Hunter, David J. | Jensen, Majken K. | Curhan, Gary | Rice, Kenneth | Penman, Alan D. | Rotter, Jerome I. | Sotoodehnia, Nona | Emeny, Rebecca | Eriksson, Johan G. | Evans, Denis A. | Ferrucci, Luigi | Fornage, Myriam | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Hofman, Albert | Illig, Thomas | Kardia, Sharon | Kelly-Hayes, Margaret | Koenen, Karestan | Kraft, Peter | Kuningas, Maris | Massaro, Joseph M. | Melzer, David | Mulas, Antonella | Mulder, Cornelis L. | Murray, Anna | Oostra, Ben A. | Palotie, Aarno | Penninx, Brenda | Petersmann, Astrid | Pilling, Luke C. | Psaty, Bruce | Rawal, Rajesh | Reiman, Eric M. | Schulz, Andrea | Shulman, Joshua M. | Singleton, Andrew B. | Smith, Albert V. | Sutin, Angelina R. | Uitterlinden, André G. | Völzke, Henry | Widen, Elisabeth | Yaffe, Kristine | Zonderman, Alan B. | Cucca, Francesco | Harris, Tamara | Ladwig, Karl-Heinz | Llewellyn, David J. | Räikkönen, Katri | Tanaka, Toshiko | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | Grabe, Hans J. | Launer, Lenore J. | Lunetta, Kathryn L. | Mosley, Thomas H. | Newman, Anne B. | Tiemeier, Henning | Murabito, Joanne
Biological psychiatry  2013;73(7):10.1016/j.biopsych.2012.09.033.
Background
Depression is a heritable trait that exists on a continuum of varying severity and duration. Yet, the search for genetic variants associated with depression has had few successes. We exploit the entire continuum of depression to find common variants for depressive symptoms.
Methods
In this genome-wide association study, we combined the results of 17 population-based studies assessing depressive symptoms with the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Replication of the independent top hits (p < 1 × 10−5) was performed in five studies assessing depressive symptoms with other instruments. In addition, we performed a combined meta-analysis of all 22 discovery and replication studies.
Results
The discovery sample comprised 34,549 individuals (mean age of 66.5) and no loci reached genome-wide significance (lowest p = 1.05 × 10−7). Seven independent single nucleotide polymorphisms were considered for replication. In the replication set (n = 16,709), we found suggestive association of one single nucleotide polymorphism with depressive symptoms (rs161645, 5q21, p = 9.19 × 10−3). This 5q21 region reached genome-wide significance (p = 4.78 × 10−8) in the overall meta-analysis combining discovery and replication studies (n = 51,258).
Conclusions
The results suggest that only a large sample comprising more than 50,000 subjects may be sufficiently powered to detect genes for depressive symptoms.
doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2012.09.033
PMCID: PMC3845085  PMID: 23290196
Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale; CHARGE consortium; depression; depressive symptoms; genetics; genome-wide association study; meta-analysis
7.  Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Novel Loci Associated With Concentrations of Four Plasma Phospholipid Fatty Acids in the De Novo Lipogenesis Pathway: Results from the CHARGE Consortium 
Background
Palmitic acid(16:0), stearic acid(18:0), palmitoleic acid(16:1n-7), and oleic acid(18:1n-9) are major saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids that affect cellular signaling and metabolic pathways. They are synthesized via de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and are the main saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids in the diet. Levels of these fatty acids have been linked to diseases including type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease.
Methods and Results
Genome-wide association studies were conducted in 5 population-based cohorts comprising 8,961 participants of European ancestry to investigate the association of common genetic variation with plasma levels of these four fatty acids. We identified polymorphisms in 7 novel loci associated with circulating levels of one or more of these fatty acids. ALG14 (asparagine-linked glycosylation 14 homolog) polymorphisms were associated with higher 16:0(P=2.7×10-11) and lower 18:0(P=2.2×10-18). FADS1 and FADS2 (desaturases) polymorphisms were associated with higher 16:1n-7(P=6.6×10-13) and 18:1n-9(P=2.2×10-32), and lower 18:0(P =1.3×10-20). LPGAT1 (lysophosphatidylglycerol acyltransferase) polymorphisms were associated with lower 18:0(P=2.8×10-9). GCKR(glucokinase regulator, P =9.8×10-10) and HIF1AN(factor inhibiting hypoxia-inducible factor-1, P=5.7×10-9) polymorphisms were associated with higher 16:1n-7, whereas PKD2L1(polycystic kidney disease 2-like 1, P=5.7×10-15) and a locus on chromosome 2(not near known genes) were associated with lower 16:1n-7(P=4.1×10-8).
Conclusion
Our findings provide novel evidence that common variations in genes with diverse functions, including protein-glycosylation, polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism, phospholipid modeling, and glucose- and oxygen-sensing pathways, are associated with circulating levels of four fatty acids in the DNL pathway. These results expand our knowledge of genetic factors relevant to DNL and fatty acid biology.
doi:10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.112.964619
PMCID: PMC3891054  PMID: 23362303
epidemiology; fatty acids; genome-wide association study
8.  Association of Plasma Selenium Concentrations with Total IGF-1 Among Older Community-Dwelling Adults: the InCHIANTI Study 
Background and Aims
Insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) stimulates cell proliferation and inhibits cell apoptosis. Recent studies underline its importance as anabolic hormone and nutritional marker in older individuals. IGF-1 synthesis and bioactivity are modulated by nutritional factors including selenium intake. However, whether circulating IGF-1 levels are positively influenced by plasma selenium, one of the most important human antioxidants, is still unknown.
Methods
Selenium and total IGF-1 were measured in 951 men and women ≥65 years from the InCHIANTI study, Tuscany, Italy.
Results
Means (SD) of plasma selenium and total IGF-1 were 0.95 (0.15) µmol/L and 113.4 (31.2) ng/mL, respectively. After adjustment for age and sex, selenium levels were positively associated with total IGF-1 (ß ± SE: 43.76±11.2, p=0.0001).After further adjustment for total energy and alcohol intake, serum alanine amino transferase (ALT), congestive heart failure, selenium remained significantly associated with IGF-1 (β ± SE: 36.7 ± 12.2, p=0.003). The association was still significant when IL-6 was introduced in the model (β ± SE: 40.1 ± 12.0, p=0.0008).
Conclusions
We found an independent, positive and significant association between selenium and IGF-1 serum levels in community dwelling older adults.
doi:10.1016/j.clnu.2010.03.012
PMCID: PMC3963695  PMID: 20416996
aging; total IGF-1; selenium
9.  Meta-Analysis Investigating Associations Between Healthy Diet and Fasting Glucose and Insulin Levels and Modification by Loci Associated With Glucose Homeostasis in Data From 15 Cohorts 
American Journal of Epidemiology  2012;177(2):103-115.
Whether loci that influence fasting glucose (FG) and fasting insulin (FI) levels, as identified by genome-wide association studies, modify associations of diet with FG or FI is unknown. We utilized data from 15 US and European cohort studies comprising 51,289 persons without diabetes to test whether genotype and diet interact to influence FG or FI concentration. We constructed a diet score using study-specific quartile rankings for intakes of whole grains, fish, fruits, vegetables, and nuts/seeds (favorable) and red/processed meats, sweets, sugared beverages, and fried potatoes (unfavorable). We used linear regression within studies, followed by inverse-variance-weighted meta-analysis, to quantify 1) associations of diet score with FG and FI levels and 2) interactions of diet score with 16 FG-associated loci and 2 FI-associated loci. Diet score (per unit increase) was inversely associated with FG (β = −0.004 mmol/L, 95% confidence interval: −0.005, −0.003) and FI (β = −0.008 ln-pmol/L, 95% confidence interval: −0.009, −0.007) levels after adjustment for demographic factors, lifestyle, and body mass index. Genotype variation at the studied loci did not modify these associations. Healthier diets were associated with lower FG and FI concentrations regardless of genotype at previously replicated FG- and FI-associated loci. Studies focusing on genomic regions that do not yield highly statistically significant associations from main-effect genome-wide association studies may be more fruitful in identifying diet-gene interactions.
doi:10.1093/aje/kws297
PMCID: PMC3707424  PMID: 23255780
diabetes; dietary pattern; gene-environment interaction; glucose; insulin
10.  Determinants and clinical significance of plasma oxidized LDLs in older individuals. A 9 years follow-up study 
Atherosclerosis  2012;226(1):201-207.
Oxidized LDLs (ox.LDLs) uptake by macrophages inside the arterial wall is a crucial step in atherosclerotic disease, and some studies suggest that high ox.LDLs plasma levels might be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, whether high ox.LDLs continue to be a CVD risk factors in older persons is unknown. We investigated the clinical correlates of plasma ox.LDLs, and their role in predicting long-term CVD/cardiac mortality in 1025 older community-dwelling individuals (mean age:75.5±7.4yrs; females:55%) from the InCHIANTI study. Kaplan-Meier curves were fitted to explore the relationship between tertiles of ox.LDLs (ox.LDL/LDL-C ratio) and time to CVD/cardiac death. Hazard Ratios (HR) were estimated by Cox regression analysis.
At multivariate analysis, ox.LDLs were independently associated with LDL-C, triglycerides, and HDL-C (adjusted r2:0.42; P=0.001). The ox.LDL/LDL-C ratio (the extent of LDLs oxidation) was independently correlated with HDL-C, triglycerides, and beta-carotene (adjusted r2:0.15, P=0.001). Among 1025 individuals, 392 died after 9 years, 166 from CVD. The HR for CVD/cardiac mortality was not significantly different across tertiles of ox.LDLs or ox.LDL/LDL-C ratio, both in the whole sample and in individuals with prevalent CVD.
We conclude that in an elderly population LDL-C, triglycerides, and HDL-C are the most important determinants of ox.LDLs levels, indirectly suggesting an association between small dense LDLs and LDLs oxidation. No association emerged between higher ox.LDLs levels and 9-years CVD/cardiac mortality, suggesting that in advanced age the prognostic information added by ox.LDLs on CVD/cardiac mortality might be negligible.
doi:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2012.10.028
PMCID: PMC3529836  PMID: 23141584
Oxidized LDL; Mortality; Cardiovascular Disease; Aging
11.  Role of Muscle Mass and Muscle Quality in the Association Between Diabetes and Gait Speed 
Diabetes Care  2012;35(8):1672-1679.
OBJECTIVE
Older people with type 2 diabetes are at high risk of mobility disability. We investigated the association of diabetes with lower-limb muscle mass and muscle quality to verify whether diabetes-related muscle impairments mediate the association between diabetes and low walking speed.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 835 participants (65 years old and older) enrolled in the InCHIANTI (Invecchiare in Chianti, aging in the Chianti area) population-based study. Total, muscular, and fat cross-sectional areas of the calf and relative muscle density were measured using peripheral quantitative computerized tomography. Indicators of muscle performance included knee-extension torque, ankle plantar flexion and dorsiflexion strength, lower-extremity muscle power, and ankle muscle quality (ratio of ankle strength to the muscle area [kilograms per centimeters squared]). Gait performance was assessed by 4- and 400-m walking speed. Diabetes was ascertained by standard American Diabetes Association criteria.
RESULTS
Prevalence of diabetes was 11.4%. After adjustment for age and sex, participants with diabetes had lower muscle density, knee and ankle strength, and muscle power and worse muscle quality (all P < 0.05). Diabetic participants were also slower on both 4-m (β: −0.115 ± 0.024 m/s, P < 0.001) and 400-m (β:−0.053 ± 0.023 m/s, P < 0.05) walking tests. In multivariable linear regression models, lower-limb muscle characteristics accounted for 24.3 and 15.1% of walking speed difference comparing diabetic and nondiabetic subjects in the 4- and 400-m walks, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS
In older persons, diabetes is associated with reduced muscle strength and worse muscle quality. These impairments are important contributors of walking limitations related to diabetes.
doi:10.2337/dc11-2202
PMCID: PMC3402248  PMID: 22596176
12.  Leukocyte CCR2 Expression Is Associated with Mini-Mental State Examination Score in Older Adults 
Rejuvenation Research  2012;15(4):395-404.
Abstract
Introduction
Circulating inflammatory markers may play an important role in cognitive impairment at older ages. Mice deficient for the chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2) develop an accelerated Alzheimer-like pathology. CCR2 is also important in neurogenesis. To identify human gene transcripts most closely associated with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores, we undertook a genome-wide and inflammation specific transcriptome screen in circulating leukocytes from a population-based sample.
Methods
We measured in vivo transcript levels by microarray analysis in 691 subjects (mean age 72.6 years) in the InCHIANTI study (Invecchiare in Chianti, aging in the Chianti area). We assessed expression associations with MMSE performance at RNA collection and prior 9-year change in MMSE score in linear regression models.
Results
In genome-wide analysis, raised CCR2 expression was cross-sectionally the most strongly associated transcript with lower MMSE score (beta=−0.16, p=5.1×10−6, false discovery rate (FDR; q=0.077). Amongst inflammatory transcripts, only CCR2 expression was associated with both MMSE score and accelerated decline in score over the preceding 9 years (beta=−0.16, p=5.1×10−6, q=0.003; and beta=−0.13, p=5.5×10−5, q=0.03, respectively). CCR2 expression was also positively associated with apolipoprotein E (ApoE) e4 Alzheimer disease risk haplotype.
Conclusions
We show for the first time that CCR2 expression is associated with lower MMSE scores in an older human population. Laboratory models of Ccr2-mediated β-amyloid removal and regulation of neurogenesis affecting cognitive function may be applicable in humans. CCR2-mediated pathways may provide a possible focus for intervention to potentiate protective reactions to Alzheimer pathology in older people, including for people with an adverse ApoE haplotype.
doi:10.1089/rej.2011.1302
PMCID: PMC3419848  PMID: 22607625
13.  Integration of GWAS SNPs and tissue specific expression profiling reveal discrete eQTLs for human traits in blood and brain 
Neurobiology of Disease  2012;47(1):20-28.
Genome wide association studies have nominated many genetic variants for common human traits, including diseases, but in many cases the underlying biological reason for a trait association is unknown. Subsets of genetic polymorphisms show a statistical association with transcript expression levels, and have therefore been nominated as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). However, many tissue and cell types have specific gene expression patterns and so it is not clear how frequently eQTLs found in one tissue type will be replicated in others. In the present study we used two appropriately powered sample series to examine the genetic control of gene expression in blood and brain. We find that while many eQTLs associated with human traits are shared between these two tissues, there are also examples where blood and brain differ, either by restricted gene expression patterns in one tissue or because of differences in how genetic variants are associated with transcript levels. These observations suggest that design of eQTL mapping experiments should consider tissue of interest for the disease or other trait studied.
doi:10.1016/j.nbd.2012.03.020
PMCID: PMC3358430  PMID: 22433082
14.  Circulating selenium and carboxymethyl-lysine, an advanced glycation end product, are independent predictors of anemia in older community-dwelling adults 
Objective
To assess whether selenium and carboxymethyl-lysine (CML), two biomarkers of oxidative stress, are independent predictors of anemia in older, community-dwelling adults.
Methods
Plasma selenium, CML, folate, vitamin B12, testosterone, and markers of iron status and inflammation were measured at baseline in 1,036 adults, ≥65 years, in the InCHIANTI Study, a population-based cohort study of aging in Tuscany, Italy, and examined in relationship to prevalent anemia and incident anemia over 6 years of follow-up.
Results
At enrollment, 11.6% of participants were anemic. Of 472 participants who were non-anemic at enrollment 72 (15.3%) developed anemia within 6 years of follow-up. At enrollment, plasma CML in the highest quartile (>425 ng/mL) and plasma selenium in the lowest quartile (<66.6 μg/L) predicted incident anemia (Hazards Ratio [H.R.] 1.67, 95% Confidence Interval [C.I.] 1.07–2.59, P = 0.02; H.R. 1.55, 95% C.I.1.01–2.38, P = 0.05, respectively) in a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model that adjusted for age, education, body mass index, cognition, inflammation, red cell distribution width, ferritin, vitamin B12, testosterone, and chronic diseases.
Conclusion
Elevated plasma carboxymethyl-lysine and low plasma selenium are long-term independent predictors of anemia among older community-dwelling adults. These findings support the idea that oxidative stress contributes to the development of anemia.
doi:10.1016/j.nut.2011.11.005
PMCID: PMC3377823  PMID: 22325035
advanced glycation end products; aging; anemia; carboxymethyl-lysine; oxidative stress; selenium
15.  Relationship of Low-Circulating “Anti-Aging” Klotho Hormone with Disability in Activities of Daily Living among Older Community-Dwelling Adults 
Rejuvenation Research  2012;15(3):295-301.
Abstract
The aging suppressor gene klotho encodes a single-pass transmembrane protein klotho that in mice is known to extend life span when overexpressed and to resemble accelerated aging, with skeletal muscle atrophy and decreased bone mineral density, when expression is disrupted. We sought to examine the relationship between plasma klotho and disability in activities of daily living (ADL) in older community-dwelling adults. In a cross-sectional study, plasma klotho was measured in a population-based sample of 802 adults, ≥65 years, who participated in the “Invecchiare in Chianti” (Aging in the Chianti Area) (InCHIANTI) study in Tuscany, Italy. The overall proportion of adults with ADL disability was 11.9%. Mean (standard deviation) klotho concentrations were 689 (238) pg/mL. From the lowest to the highest tertile of plasma klotho, 16.1%, 9.7%, and 5.6% of participants, respectively, had ADL disability (p=0.0004). Plasma klotho, per 1 standard deviation increase, was associated with ADL disability (odds ratio=0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.35–0.93, p=0.02) in a multivariate logistic regression model adjusting for age, education, cognition, physical activity, physical performance, total cholesterol, alcohol and tobacco use, and chronic diseases. Low plasma klotho concentrations were independently associated with ADL disability among older community-dwelling men and women.
doi:10.1089/rej.2011.1268
PMCID: PMC3388499  PMID: 22530731
16.  Imputation of Variants from the 1000 Genomes Project Modestly Improves Known Associations and Can Identify Low-frequency Variant - Phenotype Associations Undetected by HapMap Based Imputation 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(5):e64343.
Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have been limited by the reliance on common variants present on microarrays or imputable from the HapMap Project data. More recently, the completion of the 1000 Genomes Project has provided variant and haplotype information for several million variants derived from sequencing over 1,000 individuals. To help understand the extent to which more variants (including low frequency (1% ≤ MAF <5%) and rare variants (<1%)) can enhance previously identified associations and identify novel loci, we selected 93 quantitative circulating factors where data was available from the InCHIANTI population study. These phenotypes included cytokines, binding proteins, hormones, vitamins and ions. We selected these phenotypes because many have known strong genetic associations and are potentially important to help understand disease processes. We performed a genome-wide scan for these 93 phenotypes in InCHIANTI. We identified 21 signals and 33 signals that reached P<5×10−8 based on HapMap and 1000 Genomes imputation, respectively, and 9 and 11 that reached a stricter, likely conservative, threshold of P<5×10−11 respectively. Imputation of 1000 Genomes genotype data modestly improved the strength of known associations. Of 20 associations detected at P<5×10−8 in both analyses (17 of which represent well replicated signals in the NHGRI catalogue), six were captured by the same index SNP, five were nominally more strongly associated in 1000 Genomes imputed data and one was nominally more strongly associated in HapMap imputed data. We also detected an association between a low frequency variant and phenotype that was previously missed by HapMap based imputation approaches. An association between rs112635299 and alpha-1 globulin near the SERPINA gene represented the known association between rs28929474 (MAF = 0.007) and alpha1-antitrypsin that predisposes to emphysema (P = 2.5×10−12). Our data provide important proof of principle that 1000 Genomes imputation will detect novel, low frequency-large effect associations.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0064343
PMCID: PMC3655956  PMID: 23696881
17.  Vitamin B12 and Homocysteine Levels and 6-Year Change in Peripheral Nerve Function and Neurological Signs 
Background:
Low vitamin B12 and high homocysteine (Hcy) levels are common in older adults and may be associated with worse neurological function. The aim of this study is to determine whether changes in B12 or Hcy levels are associated with longitudinal changes in peripheral nerve function and clinical neurological signs and symptoms.
Methods:
Participants aged 60 years and older at baseline (n = 678; 72.2 ± 6.2 years; 43.5% male) were from the InCHIANTI Study. Low B12 (<260 pmol/L) and high Hcy (≥13 μmol/L) were measured at baseline and 3-year follow-up. Neurological function was assessed by peroneal nerve conduction amplitude (compound motor action potential) and velocity, neurological examination, and peripheral neuropathy symptoms at baseline, 3-year, and 6-year follow-up.
Results:
At baseline, 43.8% had low B12 levels and 58.6% had high Hcy levels. Over 6 years, 12.4% declined to poor compound motor action potential (<1 mV) and 42.1% declined to poor nerve conduction velocity (<40 m/s). In mixed models analyses, sustained high Hcy was associated with worse compound motor action potential compared with sustained normal Hcy (p = .04), adjusting for demographics, diabetes, and folate level. Participants whose Hcy level became high at follow-up were more likely to become unable to detect monofilament at 6-year follow-up compared with those with sustained normal Hcy (odds ratio: 5.4; 95% CI: 1.5–19.0), adjusting for demographics, diabetes, body mass index, and peripheral arterial disease. There was no association with vitamin B12 level or with symptoms.
Conclusions:
High Hcy may be associated with worse sensory and motor peripheral nerve function. Because poor nerve function has been associated with lower strength and physical performance, these results have important implications for disability in older adults.
doi:10.1093/gerona/glr202
PMCID: PMC3326240  PMID: 22156506
Vitamin B12; Homocysteine; Peripheral nerve function; Neurological signs
18.  Protein Intake and Muscle Strength in Older Persons: Does Inflammation Matter? 
BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES
The effect of dietary protein intake on muscle strength in older persons is unknown. The objective of this study was to examine whether protein intake is associated with change in muscle strength in older persons. Because systemic inflammation has been associated with protein catabolism, we also evaluated whethera synergistic effect exists between protein intake and inflammatory markers on change in muscle strength using a longitudinal study of community-dwelling persons aged 65 years or older.
DESIGN
Longitudinal.
SETTING
The InCHIANTI Study.
PARTICIPANTS
Five hundred and ninety-eight persons.
MEASUREMENTS
Knee extension strength was measured at baseline (1998–2000) and during 3-year follow-up (2001–2003) using a hand-held dynamometer. Protein intake was assessed using a very detailed food frequency questionnaire. The inflammatory markers included in this study were C-reactive protein (CRP), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α).
RESULTS
The main effect of protein intake on change in muscle strength was not significant, but we found a significant interaction between protein intake and CRP, IL-6 and TNF-α (p=0.003, p=0.049 and p=0.019, respectively), indicating thata lower protein intake was associated with a greater decline in muscle strength in persons with high levels of inflammatory markers.
CONCLUSION
Selectively in older persons with a pro-inflammatory state, low protein intake was associated with accelerated decline in muscle strength. These results may help to understand the factors contributing to decline in muscle strength and to identify the target population of older persons who may benefit from nutritional interventions aimed at preventing or reducing age-associated muscle impairments and its detrimental consequences.
doi:10.1111/j.1532-5415.2011.03833.x
PMCID: PMC3390191  PMID: 22283208
Muscle Strength; Protein Intake; Inflammatory markers
19.  A Meta-Analysis of Thyroid-Related Traits Reveals Novel Loci and Gender-Specific Differences in the Regulation of Thyroid Function 
Porcu, Eleonora | Medici, Marco | Pistis, Giorgio | Volpato, Claudia B. | Wilson, Scott G. | Cappola, Anne R. | Bos, Steffan D. | Deelen, Joris | den Heijer, Martin | Freathy, Rachel M. | Lahti, Jari | Liu, Chunyu | Lopez, Lorna M. | Nolte, Ilja M. | O'Connell, Jeffrey R. | Tanaka, Toshiko | Trompet, Stella | Arnold, Alice | Bandinelli, Stefania | Beekman, Marian | Böhringer, Stefan | Brown, Suzanne J. | Buckley, Brendan M. | Camaschella, Clara | de Craen, Anton J. M. | Davies, Gail | de Visser, Marieke C. H. | Ford, Ian | Forsen, Tom | Frayling, Timothy M. | Fugazzola, Laura | Gögele, Martin | Hattersley, Andrew T. | Hermus, Ad R. | Hofman, Albert | Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J. | Jensen, Richard A. | Kajantie, Eero | Kloppenburg, Margreet | Lim, Ee M. | Masciullo, Corrado | Mariotti, Stefano | Minelli, Cosetta | Mitchell, Braxton D. | Nagaraja, Ramaiah | Netea-Maier, Romana T. | Palotie, Aarno | Persani, Luca | Piras, Maria G. | Psaty, Bruce M. | Räikkönen, Katri | Richards, J. Brent | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Sala, Cinzia | Sabra, Mona M. | Sattar, Naveed | Shields, Beverley M. | Soranzo, Nicole | Starr, John M. | Stott, David J. | Sweep, Fred C. G. J. | Usala, Gianluca | van der Klauw, Melanie M. | van Heemst, Diana | van Mullem, Alies | H.Vermeulen, Sita | Visser, W. Edward | Walsh, John P. | Westendorp, Rudi G. J. | Widen, Elisabeth | Zhai, Guangju | Cucca, Francesco | Deary, Ian J. | Eriksson, Johan G. | Ferrucci, Luigi | Fox, Caroline S. | Jukema, J. Wouter | Kiemeney, Lambertus A. | Pramstaller, Peter P. | Schlessinger, David | Shuldiner, Alan R. | Slagboom, Eline P. | Uitterlinden, André G. | Vaidya, Bijay | Visser, Theo J. | Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R. | Meulenbelt, Ingrid | Rotter, Jerome I. | Spector, Tim D. | Hicks, Andrew A. | Toniolo, Daniela | Sanna, Serena | Peeters, Robin P. | Naitza, Silvia | McCarthy, Mark I.
PLoS Genetics  2013;9(2):e1003266.
Thyroid hormone is essential for normal metabolism and development, and overt abnormalities in thyroid function lead to common endocrine disorders affecting approximately 10% of individuals over their life span. In addition, even mild alterations in thyroid function are associated with weight changes, atrial fibrillation, osteoporosis, and psychiatric disorders. To identify novel variants underlying thyroid function, we performed a large meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for serum levels of the highly heritable thyroid function markers TSH and FT4, in up to 26,420 and 17,520 euthyroid subjects, respectively. Here we report 26 independent associations, including several novel loci for TSH (PDE10A, VEGFA, IGFBP5, NFIA, SOX9, PRDM11, FGF7, INSR, ABO, MIR1179, NRG1, MBIP, ITPK1, SASH1, GLIS3) and FT4 (LHX3, FOXE1, AADAT, NETO1/FBXO15, LPCAT2/CAPNS2). Notably, only limited overlap was detected between TSH and FT4 associated signals, in spite of the feedback regulation of their circulating levels by the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. Five of the reported loci (PDE8B, PDE10A, MAF/LOC440389, NETO1/FBXO15, and LPCAT2/CAPNS2) show strong gender-specific differences, which offer clues for the known sexual dimorphism in thyroid function and related pathologies. Importantly, the TSH-associated loci contribute not only to variation within the normal range, but also to TSH values outside the reference range, suggesting that they may be involved in thyroid dysfunction. Overall, our findings explain, respectively, 5.64% and 2.30% of total TSH and FT4 trait variance, and they improve the current knowledge of the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis function and the consequences of genetic variation for hypo- or hyperthyroidism.
Author Summary
Levels of thyroid hormones are tightly regulated by TSH produced in the pituitary, and even mild alterations in their concentrations are strong indicators of thyroid pathologies, which are very common worldwide. To identify common genetic variants associated with the highly heritable markers of thyroid function, TSH and FT4, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in 26,420 and 17,520 individuals, respectively, of European ancestry with normal thyroid function. Our analysis identified 26 independent genetic variants regulating these traits, several of which are new, and confirmed previously detected polymorphisms affecting TSH (within the PDE8B gene and near CAPZB, MAF/LOC440389, and NR3C2) and FT4 (within DIO1) levels. Gender-specific differences in the genetic effects of several variants for TSH and FT4 levels were identified at several loci, which offer clues to understand the known sexual dimorphism in thyroid function and pathology. Of particular clinical interest, we show that TSH-associated loci contribute not only to normal variation, but also to TSH values outside reference range, suggesting that they may be involved in thyroid dysfunction. Overall, our findings add to the developing landscape of the regulation of thyroid homeostasis and the consequences of genetic variation for thyroid related diseases.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1003266
PMCID: PMC3567175  PMID: 23408906
20.  Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D, Transitions between Frailty States, and Mortality among Older Adults: The Invecchiare in Chianti Study 
OBJECTIVES
Frailty is a dynamic geriatric syndrome characterized by decreased reserve and increased vulnerability. Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations in older adults are associated with many physiological changes that portend frailty and its consequences. We aimed to assess whether serum 25(OH)D concentrations relate to transitions between the states of robustness, prefrailty, and frailty, and to mortality.
DESIGN, SETTING, and PARTICIPANTS
Adults aged≥65 years (N=1,155) enrolled in Invecchiare in Chianti (InCHIANTI), a prospective cohort study in Tuscany, Italy.
MEASUREMENTS
Serum 25(OH)D concentrations measured at baseline and frailty state (robust, prefrail, frail) assessed at baseline and at three and six years post enrollment. Vital status was also determined at three and six years post enrollment.
RESULTS
The median (interquartile range) 25(OH)D concentration was 16.0 (10.4—25.6) ng/mL (multiply by 2.496 to convert to nmol/L). Prefrail participants with 25(OH)D<20 ng/mL were 8.9% (95% Confidence Interval [CI], 2.5—15.2%) more likely to die, 3.0% (95%CI, −5.6—14.6%) more likely to become frail, and 7.7% (95%CI, −3.5—18.7%) less likely to become robust than prefrail participants with 25(OH)D≥20 ng/mL. Among prefrail participants, each 5 ng/mL decrement of continuous 25(OH)D was associated with 1.46 times higher odds of dying (95%CI, 1.18—2.07) and 1.13 higher odds of incident frailty (95%CI, 0.90—1.39) versus recovery of robustness. Transitions from robustness or frailty were not associated with 25(OH)D.
CONCLUSION
Results provide evidence that prefrailty is an “at risk” state from which older adults with high 25(OH)D are more likely to recover than to decline. However, high 25(OH)D was not associated with recovery from frailty. Thus, 25(OH)D should be investigated as a potential therapy to treat prefrailty and prevent further decline.
doi:10.1111/j.1532-5415.2011.03830.x
PMCID: PMC3288698  PMID: 22283177
Frailty; Mortality; Vitamin D
21.  Association Between Chromosome 9p21 Variants and the Ankle-Brachial Index Identified by a Meta-Analysis of 21 Genome-Wide Association Studies 
Murabito, Joanne M. | White, Charles C. | Kavousi, Maryam | Sun, Yan V. | Feitosa, Mary F. | Nambi, Vijay | Lamina, Claudia | Schillert, Arne | Coassin, Stefan | Bis, Joshua C. | Broer, Linda | Crawford, Dana C. | Franceschini, Nora | Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth | Haun, Margot | Holewijn, Suzanne | Huffman, Jennifer E. | Hwang, Shih-Jen | Kiechl, Stefan | Kollerits, Barbara | Montasser, May E. | Nolte, Ilja M. | Rudock, Megan E. | Senft, Andrea | Teumer, Alexander | van der Harst, Pim | Vitart, Veronique | Waite, Lindsay L. | Wood, Andrew R. | Wassel, Christina L. | Absher, Devin M. | Allison, Matthew A. | Amin, Najaf | Arnold, Alice | Asselbergs, Folkert W. | Aulchenko, Yurii | Bandinelli, Stefania | Barbalic, Maja | Boban, Mladen | Brown-Gentry, Kristin | Couper, David J. | Criqui, Michael H. | Dehghan, Abbas | Heijer, Martin den | Dieplinger, Benjamin | Ding, Jingzhong | Dörr, Marcus | Espinola-Klein, Christine | Felix, Stephan B. | Ferrucci, Luigi | Folsom, Aaron R. | Fraedrich, Gustav | Gibson, Quince | Goodloe, Robert | Gunjaca, Grgo | Haltmayer, Meinhard | Heiss, Gerardo | Hofman, Albert | Kieback, Arne | Kiemeney, Lambertus A. | Kolcic, Ivana | Kullo, Iftikhar J. | Kritchevsky, Stephen B. | Lackner, Karl J. | Li, Xiaohui | Lieb, Wolfgang | Lohman, Kurt | Meisinger, Christa | Melzer, David | Mohler, Emile R | Mudnic, Ivana | Mueller, Thomas | Navis, Gerjan | Oberhollenzer, Friedrich | Olin, Jeffrey W. | O’Connell, Jeff | O’Donnell, Christopher J. | Palmas, Walter | Penninx, Brenda W. | Petersmann, Astrid | Polasek, Ozren | Psaty, Bruce M. | Rantner, Barbara | Rice, Ken | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Rotter, Jerome I. | Seldenrijk, Adrie | Stadler, Marietta | Summerer, Monika | Tanaka, Toshiko | Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne | Uitterlinden, Andre G. | van Gilst, Wiek H. | Vermeulen, Sita H. | Wild, Sarah H. | Wild, Philipp S. | Willeit, Johann | Zeller, Tanja | Zemunik, Tatijana | Zgaga, Lina | Assimes, Themistocles L. | Blankenberg, Stefan | Boerwinkle, Eric | Campbell, Harry | Cooke, John P. | de Graaf, Jacqueline | Herrington, David | Kardia, Sharon L. R. | Mitchell, Braxton D. | Murray, Anna | Münzel, Thomas | Newman, Anne | Oostra, Ben A. | Rudan, Igor | Shuldiner, Alan R. | Snieder, Harold | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | Völker, Uwe | Wright, Alan F. | Wichmann, H.-Erich | Wilson, James F. | Witteman, Jacqueline C.M. | Liu, Yongmei | Hayward, Caroline | Borecki, Ingrid B. | Ziegler, Andreas | North, Kari E. | Cupples, L. Adrienne | Kronenberg, Florian
Background
Genetic determinants of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remain largely unknown. To identify genetic variants associated with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), a noninvasive measure of PAD, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association study data from 21 population-based cohorts.
Methods and Results
Continuous ABI and PAD (ABI≤0.9) phenotypes adjusted for age and sex were examined. Each study conducted genotyping and imputed data to the ~2.5 million SNPs in HapMap. Linear and logistic regression models were used to test each SNP for association with ABI and PAD using additive genetic models. Study-specific data were combined using fixed-effects inverse variance weighted meta-analyses. There were a total of 41,692 participants of European ancestry (~60% women, mean ABI 1.02 to 1.19), including 3,409 participants with PAD and with GWAS data available. In the discovery meta-analysis, rs10757269 on chromosome 9 near CDKN2B had the strongest association with ABI (β= −0.006, p=2.46x10−8). We sought replication of the 6 strongest SNP associations in 5 population-based studies and 3 clinical samples (n=16,717). The association for rs10757269 strengthened in the combined discovery and replication analysis (p=2.65x10−9). No other SNP associations for ABI or PAD achieved genome-wide significance. However, two previously reported candidate genes for PAD and one SNP associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) were associated with ABI : DAB21P (rs13290547, p=3.6x10−5); CYBA (rs3794624, p=6.3x10−5); and rs1122608 (LDLR, p=0.0026).
Conclusions
GWAS in more than 40,000 individuals identified one genome-wide significant association on chromosome 9p21 with ABI. Two candidate genes for PAD and 1 SNP for CAD are associated with ABI.
doi:10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.111.961292
PMCID: PMC3303225  PMID: 22199011
cohort study; genetic association; genome-wide association study; meta-analysis; peripheral vascular disease
22.  Absolute Strength and Loss of Strength as Predictors of Mobility Decline in Older Adults: The InCHIANTI Study 
Background.
Theoretical definitions of sarcopenia traditionally emphasize age-related loss of muscle strength; however, most analyses of the association between strength and mobility examine strength at a single time point. This study sought to identify sex-specific cutpoints for muscle strength and power (at one time point) and 3-year changes in strength and power that would maximize prediction of 3-year mobility decline.
Methods.
Longitudinal analysis of 934 adults aged ≥65 years enrolled in the Invecchiare in Chianti study was conducted. Grip strength, knee extension strength, and lower extremity power were measured at baseline and 3 years postenrollment. Mobility function (gait speed and self-reported mobility disability) was measured at 3 and 6 years postenrollment. Classification and regression tree analysis was used to predict mobility decline from Years 3 to 6.
Results.
Men with knee extension strength <19.2 kg and grip strength <39.0 kg had clinically meaningful declines in gait speed of .24 m/s. Furthermore, men with power <105 W were nearly nine times more likely to develop incident mobility disability (likelihood ratio = 8.68; 95% confidence interval = 3.91, 19.44). Among women, knee extension strength <18.0 kg was associated with a minimal gait speed decline of 0.06 m/s, and women with leg power <64 W were three times more likely to develop incident mobility disability (likelihood ratio = 3.01; 95% confidence interval = 1.79, 5.08). Three-year changes in strength and power did not predict mobility decline in either sex.
Conclusions.
Findings suggest that strength and power measured at one time point are more predictive of mobility decline than 3-year changes and that low strength and power are particularly powerful risk factors in men.
doi:10.1093/gerona/glr055
PMCID: PMC3260485  PMID: 21546582
Strength; Sarcopenia; Mobility decline
23.  The relationship between plasma carotenoids and depressive symptoms in older persons 
Objective
We examined the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationship between plasma carotenoids and depressive symptoms over a six-year follow-up in older persons.
Methods and Materials
This research is part of the InCHIANTI Study, a prospective population-based study of older persons in Tuscany, Italy. The sample for this analysis included 958 women and men aged 65 years and older. Plasma total carotenoids were assessed at baseline. Depressive symptoms were assessed at baseline and at the 3- and 6-year follow-up using the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D). Depressed mood was defined as CES-D≥20.
Results
At baseline, higher total carotenoids level were associated with lower probability of depressed mood (OR=0.82, 95%CI=0.68–0.99, p=0.04) after adjustment for sociodemographic, health and inflammation. After the exclusion of participants with baseline depressed mood and use of antidepressants, higher total carotenoids level were associated with lower risk of incident depressed mood (OR=0.72, 95%CI=0.52–0.99, p=0.04) at 6-year follow-up, after adjustment for confounders plus baseline CES-D. Inflammatory marker Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist partially mediated this association.
Discussion
Low plasma concentrations of carotenoids are associated with depressive symptoms and predict the development of new depressive symptoms in older persons. Understanding the mechanism of this association may reveal potential targets for prevention and treatment.
doi:10.3109/15622975.2011.597876
PMCID: PMC3360996  PMID: 21929378
Carotenoids; antioxidants; depression; inflammation; aging
24.  Plasma klotho and cardiovascular disease in adults 
OBJECTIVES
To determine whether plasma klotho, a recently discovered hormone that has been implicated in atherosclerosis, is related to prevalent cardiovascular disease in adults.
DESIGN
Cross-sectional.
SETTING
Population-based sample of adults residing in Tuscany, Italy.
PARTICIPANTS
One thousand and twenty-three men and women, aged 24–102, participating in the Invecchiare in Chianti (InCHIANTI) study.
MEASUREMENTS
Anthropometric measures, plasma klotho, fasting plasma total, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, creatinine, C-reactive protein. Clinical measures: medical assessment, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, coronary heart disease, heart failure, stroke, peripheral artery disease, cancer, chronic kidney disease. Logistic regression models were used to examine the relationship between plasma klotho and prevalent cardiovascular disease.
RESULTS
Of 1023 participants, 259 (25.3%) had cardiovascular disease. Median (25th, 75th percentile) plasma klotho concentrations were 676 (530, 819) pg/mL. Plasma klotho was correlated with age (r = −0.14, P <0.0001), HDL cholesterol (r = 0.11, P = 0.0004), C-reactive protein (r = −0.10, P = 0.0008), but not systolic blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, or renal function. Plasma klotho age-adjusted geometric means (95% Confidence Interval [C.I.]) were 626 (601, 658) in participants with cardiovascular disease and 671 (652, 692) pg/mL in those without cardiovascular disease (P = 0.0001). Adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors (age, sex, smoking, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, and diabetes), log plasma klotho was associated with prevalent cardiovascular disease (Odds Ratio per 1 standard deviation increase = 0.85, 95% C.I. 0.72, 0.99).
CONCLUSION
In community-dwelling adults, higher plasma klotho concentrations are independently associated with a lower likelihood of having cardiovascular disease.
doi:10.1111/j.1532-5415.2011.03558.x
PMCID: PMC3486641  PMID: 21883107
aging; atherosclerosis; cardiovascular disease; C-reactive protein; klotho
25.  CCAAT-Enhancer-Binding Protein-Beta (CEBPB) Expression In-Vivo is Associated with Muscle Strength 
Aging cell  2012;11(2):262-268.
Introduction
Declining muscle strength is a core feature of aging. Several mechanisms have been postulated, including CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-beta (C/EBP-β) triggered macrophage-mediated muscle fibre regeneration after micro-injury, evidenced in a mouse model. We aimed to identify in-vivo circulating leukocyte gene expression changes associated with muscle strength in the human adult population.
Methods
We undertook a genome wide expression microarray screen, using peripheral blood RNA samples from InCHIANTI study participants (ages 30–104 yrs). Logged expression intensities were regressed with muscle strength using models adjusted for multiple confounders. Key results were validated by real-time PCR. The Short Physical Performance Battery score (SPPB) tested walk speed, chair stand and balance.
Results
CEBPB expression levels were associated with muscle strength (beta coefficient = 0.20560, p=1.03*10−6, false discovery rate q=0.014). The estimated handgrip strength in 70 year old men in the lowest CEBPB expression tertile was 35.2 kg compared to 41.2 kg in the top tertile. CEBPB expression was also associated with hip, knee, ankle and shoulder strength and the SPPB performance score (p=0.018). Near study-wide associations were also noted for TGFB3 (p=3.4*10−5, q=0.12) and CEBPD expression (p=9.67E−5, q=0.18) but not for CEBPA expression.
Conclusions
We report here a novel finding that raised CEBPB expression in circulating leukocyte derived RNA samples in-vivo is associated with greater muscle strength and better physical performance in humans. This association may be consistent with mouse model evidence of CEBPB triggered muscle repair: if this mechanism is confirmed it may provide a target for intervention to protect and enhance aging muscle.
doi:10.1111/j.1474-9726.2011.00782.x
PMCID: PMC3486692  PMID: 22152057
macrophage; inflammation; transcription; regeneration; population; mechanism

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