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1.  Acceptability and usability of self-collected sampling for HPV testing among African American women living in the Mississippi Delta 
Background
HPV DNA testing has been shown to be an effective approach to cervical cancer screening, and self-collection sampling for HPV testing could be a potential alternative to Pap test, provided that women who tested positive by any method get timely follow-up and care. This feasibility study examined acceptability and usability of self-collected sampling for HPV testing among African American (AA) women in the Mississippi Delta in order to inform the development of interventions to promote cervical cancer screening in this population.
Methods
The study consisted of two phases. Phase I consisted of eight focus groups (N=87) with AA women to explore knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about cervical cancer and HPV infection as well as acceptability of self-collected sampling for HPV testing. In Phase II, we examined the usability of this technology through one discussion group (N=9). The Health Belief Model guided data collection and analysis.
Results
Although participants perceived themselves as susceptible to cervical cancer and acknowledged its severity, there was a lack of knowledge of the link between HPV and cervical cancer, and they expressed a number of misconceptions. The most frequent barriers to screening included embarrassment, discomfort, and fear of the results. Women in both phases were receptive to self-collection sampling for HPV testing. All participants in the usability phase expressed that self-collection was easy and they did not experience any difficulties.
Conclusion
Self-collection for HPV testing is an acceptable and feasible method among AA women in the Mississippi Delta to complement current cytology cervical cancer screening programs.
doi:10.1016/j.whi.2012.12.003
PMCID: PMC3596478  PMID: 23410619
gynecological cancer; sexually transmitted infections; health disparities
2.  Assessing the Risk of Ovarian Malignancy in Asymptomatic Women With Abnormal CA 125 and Transvaginal Ultrasound in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Screening Trial 
Obstetrics and gynecology  2013;121(1):25-31.
Objective
To estimate the risk of ovarian malignancy among asymptomatic women with abnormal transvaginal ultrasound or CA 125 and to provide guidance to physicians managing these women.
Methods
A cohort of women from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial with abnormal ovarian results at the initial (T0) and subsequent (T1+) screens were analyzed to estimate which findings were associated with high risk of ovarian cancer. Risks of cancer of greater than 10% were designated as high and risks of 3% or less as low.
Results
For the T0 screen, two high-risk categories were identified: CA 125 of 70 or more with negative transvaginal ultrasound (positive predictive value [PPV] 15.9%, CI 14.7%–17.7%); and positive for both CA 125 and transvaginal ultrasound (PPV 25.0%, CI 23.3%–27.3%). For T1+ screens, three high-risk categories were identified: negative transvaginal ultrasound with change in CA 125 greater than 45 or more (PPV 29.0%, CI 28.3%–30.3%); increase in size of cyst 6 cm or greater with negative CA 125 (PPV 13.3%, CI 10.5%–18.0%); and positive for both tests (PPV 42.9%, CI 40.0%–46.0%). High-risk criteria for T0 provide a sensitivity of 60%, specificity 96.2%, PPV 19.7%, and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 99.3%. T1+ criteria yielded a sensitivity of 85.3%, specificity 95.6%, PPV 29.6% and NPV 99.7%.
Conclusions
High risk categories for predicting risk of cancer in women with abnormal CA 125, TVU or both at initial and subsequent screens have been identified. The large number of women in this study, the four year complete follow-up, and very small number of invasive cancers in the low risk categories provides guidance for clinical decisions regarding need for surgery in these women.
PMCID: PMC3711412  PMID: 23262924
3.  A Lower Degree of PBMC L1 Methylation Is Associated with Excess Body Weight and Higher HOMA-IR in the Presence of Lower Concentrations of Plasma Folate 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(1):e54544.
Background
Identification of associations between global DNA methylation and excess body weight (EBW) and related diseases and their modifying factors are an unmet research need that may lead to decreasing DNA methylation-associated disease risks in humans. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the following; 1) Association between the degree of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) L1 methylation and folate, and indicators of EBW, 2) Association between the degree of PBMC L1 methylation and folate, and insulin resistance (IR) as indicated by a higher homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR).
Methods
The study population consisted of 470 child-bearing age women diagnosed with abnormal pap. The degree of PBMC L1 methylation was assessed by pyrosequencing. Logistic regression models specified indicators of EBW (body mass index–BMI, body fat–BF and waist circumference–WC) or HOMA-IR as dependent variables and the degree of PBMC L1 methylation and circulating concentrations of folate as the independent predictor of primary interest.
Results
Women with a lower degree of PBMC L1 methylation and lower plasma folate concentrations were significantly more likely to have higher BMI, % BF or WC (OR = 2.49, 95% CI:1.41–4.47, P = 0.002; OR = 2.49, 95% CI:1.40–4.51, P = 0.002 and OR = 1.98, 95%  = 1.14–3.48 P = 0.0145, respectively) and higher HOMA-IR (OR = 1.78, 95% CI:1.02–3.13, P = 0.041).
Conclusion
Our results demonstrated that a lower degree of PBMC L1 methylation is associated with excess body weight and higher HOMA-IR, especially in the presence of lower concentrations of plasma folate.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0054544
PMCID: PMC3554730  PMID: 23358786
4.  Human papillomavirus genotypes detected in clinician-collected and self-collected specimens from women living in the Mississippi Delta 
Background
There are no data available on human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in women living in the Mississippi Delta, where cervical cancer incidence and mortality among African American women is among the highest in the United States. The aim of this analysis was to report the age-specific prevalence of HPV in this population.
Methods
We recruited 443 women, 26–65 years of age, from the general population of women living in the Mississippi Delta to participate; 252 women had been screened for cervical cancer within the last 3 years while 191 had not. Women underwent a pelvic exam and had clinician-collected Pap sample taken for the routine cervical cancer screening by cytology. Women were asked to collect a self-collected specimen at home and return it to the clinic. Both specimens were tested for HPV genotypes.
Results
Four hundred and six women (91.6%) had HPV genotyping results for the clinician-collected and self-collected specimens. The prevalence of carcinogenic HPV was 18.0% (95% CI: 14.4%-22.1%) for clinician-collected specimens and 26.8% (95% CI: 22.6%-31.4%) for self-collected specimens. The concordance for the detection of carcinogenic HPV between clinician-collected and self-collected specimens was only fair (kappa = 0.54). While the prevalence of carcinogenic HPV in either sample decreased sharply with increasing age (ptrend< 0.01), the prevalence of non-carcinogenic HPV did not, especially the prevalence of HPV genotypes in the alpha 3/4/15 phylogenetic group.
Conclusions
The prevalence of carcinogenic HPV in our sample of women living in the Mississippi Delta was greater than the prevalence reported in several other U.S. studies. The high carriage of HPV infection, along with lack of participation in cervical cancer screening by some women, may contribute to the high cervical cancer burden in the region.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-13-5
PMCID: PMC3570306  PMID: 23289357
Human papillomavirus (HPV); Self-collection; Pap; Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia; Cervix
5.  The Protective Association of MTHFR Polymorphism on Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia is Modified by Riboflavin Status 
Objectives
We previously reported that women polymorphic for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene were less likely to have cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2 or 3 (odds ratio [OR] = 0.40, 95 % confidence interval [CI]: 0.21, 0.78, p=0.007). In the current study, we tested whether this protective association is modified by the circulating riboflavin status in the same study population.
Methods
Riboflavin status was assessed by the erythrocyte glutathione reductase (EGR) assay and expressed in terms of an EGR activity coefficient (EGRAC). The status of MTHFR polymorphism, riboflavin, and circulating concentrations of folate, vitamins B-12, A, E, C and total carotene were ascertained in 170 White and 265 African-American women positive for the cervical presence of high-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV). Presence/absence of CIN 2 or 3 was determined histologically, and associations with risk factors were examined using multiple logistic regression. Eighty women with CIN 2 or 3 lesions were compared to 355 women without cervical lesions. Based on the median EGRAC of 1.4, women were grouped into low (> 1.4) and high (≤1.4) riboflavin status.
Results
Women with MTHFR polymorphism and low riboflavin status were significantly less likely to have CIN 2 or 3 than the referent group of women without the polymorphism and high riboflavin status (OR = 0.35, 95% CI: 0.13, 0.92, p= 0.034). MTHFR polymorphism was not associated with CIN 2 or 3 in women with high riboflavin status (OR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.22, 1.19, p = 0.119), nor were any of the associations influenced by folate levels.
Conclusions
A further inactivation of polymorphic MTHFR by low riboflavin status and a resulting shift in the folate metabolic pathway toward DNA synthesis may explain these observations. The practical implications of this complex gene-nutrient-disease interaction will require further investigation.
doi:10.1016/j.nut.2006.12.006
PMCID: PMC2025704  PMID: 17303386
MTHFR; riboflavin; cervical; neoplasia
6.  BRCA1 proteins regulate growth of ovarian cancer cells by tethering Ubc9 
Mutation in the BRCA1 gene is associated with increased risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. In sporadic ovarian tumors, BRCA1 dysfunction is thought to be common. BRCA1 is a nuclear-cytoplasm shuttling protein. Our group has previously reported that BRCA1 proteins, unlike K109R and cancer-predisposing mutant C61G BRCA1 proteins, bind the sole SUMO E2-conjugating enzyme Ubc9. In this study, we examined the result of altered Ubc9 binding and knockdown on the sub-cellular localization and growth inhibitory function of BRCA1 proteins in ovarian cancer cells. Using live imaging of YFP, RFP-tagged BRCA1 and BRCA1a proteins, our results show enhanced cytoplasmic localization of K109R and C61G mutant BRCA1 proteins in ES-2, NIHOVCAR3 and UWB 1.289 ovarian cancer cells. Down-regulation of Ubc9 in ovarian cancer cells using Ubc9 siRNA resulted in cytoplasmic localization of BRCA1 and BRCA1a proteins. These mutant BRCA1a proteins were impaired in their capacity to inhibit growth of ES-2 ovarian cancer cells. Several ovarian cancer cells, including a BRCA1-null ovarian cancer cell line, showed higher levels of expression of Ubc9. This is the first study demonstrating the physiological link between loss of Ubc9 binding and loss of growth suppression of disease-associated mutant BRCA1a proteins in ovarian cancer cells. BRCA1, by turning off or on Ubc9 binding, regulates growth of ovarian cancers.
PMCID: PMC3433105  PMID: 22957306
BRCA1; BRCA1a; Ubc9; Ovarian cancer; RING domain mutants; nuclear import; Growth suppression
7.  Creating a 21st Century Global Health Agenda 
Diabetes Care  2011;34(6):1440-1441.
doi:10.2337/dc11-9999
PMCID: PMC3114344  PMID: 21593305
8.  Comparative Community Outreach to Increase Cervical Cancer Screening in the Mississippi Delta † 
Preventive medicine  2011;52(6):452-455.
Objective
To increase participation in cervical cancer screening of under-served women living in the Mississippi Delta, a U.S. population at high risk for cervical cancer
Methods
We conducted a door-to-door feasibility study of women living in the Mississippi Delta to increase participation in cervical cancer screening in 2009-10. Women (n=119) aged 26-65 years who had not been screened in last 3 years or more, were not pregnant, and had a cervix were offered a choice: clinic-based Pap testing or home self-collection with HPV DNA testing.
Results
Seventy-seven women (64.7%) chose self-collection with HPV testing, of which 62 (80.5%) returned their self-collected specimen. By comparison, 42 women (35.3%) chose Pap testing, of which 17 (40.5%) attended their clinic appointment. Thus there was an almost 4-fold greater participation of under-screened women in self-collection with HPV testing than in free Pap testing (78.4% vs. 21.5%).
Conclusions
We found that offering self-collection will increase participation in cervical cancer screening among under-screened populations living in the Mississippi Delta. Based on these preliminary results, we suggest that self-collection with HPV DNA testing might complement current Pap testing programs to reach under-screened populations of women, such as those living in the Mississippi Delta.
doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.03.018
PMCID: PMC3114876  PMID: 21497619
Pap; cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN); cervical cancer; human papillomavirus (HPV); atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US); Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2); health disparities; cervical cancer screening
9.  Comparative Performance of Human Papillomavirus DNA Testing Using Novel Sample Collection Methods ▿  
Journal of Clinical Microbiology  2011;49(12):4185-4189.
To explore alternative cervical cancer screening approaches in an underserved population, we compared the performance of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA assays in combination with different sample collection methods for primary cervical screening in the Mississippi Delta region. Three specimens were collected from women aged 26 to 65 years who were either routinely undergoing screening (n = 252) or not (n = 191): clinician-collected cervical specimens, clinician-collected cervicovaginal specimens, and self-collected cervicovaginal specimens taken at home. A novel collection device and medium were used for cervicovaginal sampling. Specimens were tested by three HPV DNA assays: hybrid capture 2 (HC2; Qiagen Corp., Gaithersburg, MD), Linear Array (LA; Roche Molecular Systems, Pleasanton, CA), and Amplicor (Roche Molecular Systems, Pleasanton, CA). Liquid-based cytology was performed on cervical specimens. We compared the overall positivity (a proxy for clinical specificity) for any carcinogenic HPV genotype and calculated the agreement across assay and specimen type using McNemar's test for differences in test positivity. Across all three assays there were no significant differences between clinician-collected and self-collected cervicovaginal specimens (P > 0.01 for all comparisons). For both cervicovaginal specimens (clinician collected and self-collected), fewer women tested positive by HC2 than by LA or Amplicor (P < 0.01 for all comparisons). HC2 had the best agreement between specimens for all assays. HC2 is likely more clinically specific, although possibly less sensitive, than either PCR test. Thus, use of HC2 on cervicovaginal specimens for screening could result in fewer referrals compared to LA and Amplicor.
doi:10.1128/JCM.01254-11
PMCID: PMC3232937  PMID: 21998422
10.  A higher degree of LINE-1 methylation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, a one-carbon nutrient related epigenetic alteration, is associated with a lower risk of developing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 
Objective
The objective of the study was to evaluate LINE-1 methylation as an intermediate biomarker for the effect of folate and vitamin B12 on the occurrence of higher grades of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 2+).
Methods
Study included 376 women who tested positive for HR-HPVs and were diagnosed with CIN 2+ (cases) or ≤ CIN 1 (non-cases). CIN 2+ (yes/no) was the dependent variable in logistic regression models that specified the degree of LINE-1 methylation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and of exfoliated cervical cells (CCs) as the independent predictors of primary interest. In analyses restricted to non-cases, PBMC LINE-1 methylation (≥70% vs. <70%) and CC LINE-1 methylation (≥54% vs. <54%) were the dependent variables in logistic regression models that specified the circulating concentrations of folate and vitamin B12 as the primary independent predictors.
Results
Women in the highest tertile of PBMC LINE-1 methylation had 56% lower odds of being diagnosed with CIN 2+ (OR = 0.44; 95% CI, 0.24-0.83; P = 0.011) while there was no significant association between degree of CC LINE-1 methylation and CIN 2+ (OR = 0.86; 95% CI, 0.51-1.46; P = 0.578). Among non-cases, women with supra-physiologic concentrations of folate (>19.8 ng/mL) and sufficient concentrations of plasma vitamin B12 (≥ 200.6 ng/mL) were significantly more likely to have highly methylated PBMCs compared to women with lower folate and lower vitamin B12 (OR = 3.92; 95% CI, 1.06-14.52; P = 0.041). None of the variables including folate and vitamin B12 were significantly associated with CC LINE-1 methylation.
Conclusions
These results suggest that a higher degree of LINE-1 methylation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, a one-carbon nutrient related epigenetic alteration, is associated with a lower risk of developing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.
doi:10.1016/j.nut.2010.08.018
PMCID: PMC3070926  PMID: 21463750
methylation; cervical; neoplasia
11.  Ubc9 Mediates Nuclear Localization and Growth Suppression of BRCA1 and BRCA1a Proteins 
Journal of Cellular Physiology  2011;226(12):3355-3367.
BRCA1 gene mutations are responsible for hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. In sporadic breast tumors, BRCA1 dysfunction or aberrant subcellular localization is thought to be common. BRCA1 is a nuclear–cytoplasm shuttling protein and the reason for cytoplasmic localization of BRCA1 in young breast cancer patients is not yet known. We have previously reported BRCA1 proteins unlike K109R and cancer-predisposing mutant C61G to bind Ubc9 and modulate ER-α turnover. In the present study, we have examined the consequences of altered Ubc9 binding and knockdown on the subcellular localization and growth inhibitory function of BRCA1 proteins. Our results using live imaging of YFP, GFP, RFP-tagged BRCA1, BRCA1a and BRCA1b proteins show enhanced cytoplasmic localization of K109 R and C61G mutant BRCA1 proteins in normal and cancer cells. Furthermore, down-regulation of Ubc9 in MCF-7 cells using Ubc9 siRNA resulted in enhanced cytoplasmic localization of BRCA1 protein and exclusive cytoplasmic retention of BRCA1a and BRCA1b proteins. These mutant BRCA1 proteins were transforming and impaired in their capacity to inhibit growth of MCF-7 and CAL51 breast cancer cells. Interestingly, cytoplasmic BRCA1a mutants showed more clonogenicity in soft agar and higher levels of expression of Ubc9 than parental MCF7 cells. This is the first report demonstrating the physiological link between cytoplasmic mislocalization of mutant BRCA1 proteins, loss of ER-α repression, loss of ubiquitin ligase activity and loss of growth suppression of BRCA1 proteins. Thus, binding of BRCA1 proteins to nuclear chaperone Ubc9 provides a novel mechanism for nuclear import and control of tumor growth.
doi:10.1002/jcp.22695
PMCID: PMC3329759  PMID: 21344391
12.  A higher degree of methylation of the HPV 16 E6 gene is associated with a lower likelihood of being diagnosed with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 
Cancer  2010;117(5):957-963.
Background
Even though HPV 16 is the most common HPV genotype associated with cancerous lesions of the cervix, only a fraction of HPV 16 infected women are diagnosed with pre-cancerous lesions of the cervix. Therefore, molecular changes in HPV 16 rather than infections per se may serve as better screening or diagnostic biomarkers. The purpose of the study was to evaluate whether methylation status of specific regions of the HPV E6 gene promoter and enhancer is independently associated with the likelihood of being diagnosed with higher grades of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 2+).
Methods
The study included 75 HPV 16 positive women diagnosed with CIN 2+ or ≤ CIN 1. Pyrosequencing technology was applied to quantify methylation at 6 cytosine guanine dinucleotide (CpG) sites of the HPV 16 E6 promoter and enhancer. CIN 2+ (yes/no) was the dependent variable in logistic regression models that specified the degree of methylation of the CpG sites of the HPV 16 E6 gene as the primary independent predictors. All models were adjusted for demographic, lifestyle, known risk factors for cervical cancer and circulating concentrations of “cancer-protective” micronutrients.
Results
The odds of being diagnosed with CIN 2+ was 79% lower when the degree of methylation of the HPV 16 enhancer and promoter sites were ≥9.5% (OR= 0.21; 95% CI, 0.06–0.79; P=0.02).
Conclusions
Results suggested that CpG methylation is independently involved in the biology of HPV-16 as well as in the development of higher grades of CIN.
doi:10.1002/cncr.25511
PMCID: PMC3023831  PMID: 20945322
HPV 16; methylation; cervical; neoplasia
13.  Cancer Health Disparities: What We Have Done 
PMCID: PMC3230119  PMID: 18461726
Health disparities; Cancer prevention; African American; Breast cancer; Cervical cancer; Rural medicine
14.  Usefulness of serum mass spectrometry to identify women diagnosed with higher grades of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia may differ by race 
Background
An early detection of precursor lesions of cervical cancer will help to eliminate the worldwide burden of cervical cancer.
Methods
This exploratory study aimed to identify, by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS), serum protein profiles that distinguish cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades CIN 1 or lower (≤CIN 1) from CIN 2+ among 127 women infected with human papillomavirus (HPV) 16. Of these 127 women, 25 and 23 were diagnosed with CIN 2 or CIN 3, respectively (cases), and 79 were diagnosed with ≤CIN 1 (non-cases). Serum protein profiles were generated by MALDI-TOF-MS. A total of 95 m/z peaks were tested for association with case status by two racial groups, African American (AAs) and Caucasian American (CAs).
Results
Overall, 2 protein peaks identified by our study demonstrated higher specificity for identifying CIN 2+ than previously published studies. An increasing intensity of [m/z 4459] was associated with a higher risk of being a case, regardless of race with a specificity of 58% for CIN 2 and a specificity of 75% for CIN 3. An increasing intensity of [m/z 4154] was not only associated with a higher risk of being a case only among CAs, but also had an opposite effect among AAs.
Conclusion
Identification of specific proteins associated with the peaks detected in serum and development of antibody-based tests such as ELISA should lead to the development of race-specific, non-invasive and cost effective screening tests with higher specificity for identifying HPV 16 associated CIN 2+.
doi:10.2147/IJWH.S20685
PMCID: PMC3140814  PMID: 21792340
serum mass spectrometry; cervical intraepithelial neoplasia; race
15.  Cervical Cancer Prevention: New Tools and Old Barriers 
Cancer  2010;116(11):2531-2542.
Cervical cancer is the second most common female tumor worldwide and its incidence is disproportionately high (>80%) in the developing world. In the U.S., where Pap tests have reduced the annual incidence to approximately 11,000 cervical cancers, more than 60% of cases occur in medically-underserved populations as part of a complex of diseases linked to poverty, race/ethnicity, and/or health disparities. Because carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infections cause virtually all cervical cancer, two new approaches for cervical cancer prevention have emerged: 1) HPV vaccination to prevent infections in younger women (≤18 years old) and 2) carcinogenic HPV detection in older women (≥30 years old). Together, HPV vaccination and testing, if used in an age-appropriate manner, have the potential to transform cervical cancer prevention particularly among underserved populations. Yet significant barriers of access, acceptability, and adoption to any cervical cancer prevention strategy remain. Without understanding and addressing these obstacles, these promising new tools for cervical cancer prevention may be futile. We share our experiences in the delivery of cervical cancer prevention strategies to U.S. populations experiencing high cervical cancer burden: African-American women in South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi; Haitian immigrant women in Miami; Hispanic women in the U.S.-Mexico Border; Sioux/Native American women in the Northern Plains; white women in the Appalachia; and Vietnamese-American women in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Our goal is to inform future research and outreach efforts to reduce the burden of cervical cancer in underserved populations.
doi:10.1002/cncr.25065
PMCID: PMC2876205  PMID: 20310056
16.  Indian women with higher serum concentrations of folate and vitamin B12 are significantly less likely to be infected with carcinogenic or high-risk (HR) types of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) 
Background:
Studies conducted in the USA have demonstrated that micronutrients such as folate and vitamin B12 play a significant role in modifying the natural history of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs), the causative agent for developing invasive cervical cancer (CC) and its precursor lesions.
Objective:
The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether these micronutrients have similar effects on HR-HPV infections in Indian women.
Methods:
The associations between serum concentrations of folate and vitamin B12 and HR-HPV infections were evaluated in 724 women who participated in a CC screening study in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh, India. Serum folate and vitamin B12 concentrations were measured by using a competitive radio-binding assay. Digene hybrid capture 2 (HC2) assay results were used to categorize women into two groups, positive or negative for HR-HPVs. Unconditional logistic regression models specified a binary indicator of HC2 (positive/negative) as the dependent variable and serum folate concentrations combined with serum vitamin B12 concentrations as the independent predictor of primary interest. Models were fitted, adjusting for age, education, marital status, parity, type of fuel used for cooking and smoking status.
Results:
Women with higher concentrations of serum folate (>6 ng/mL) and vitamin B12 (>356 pg/mL) were at lower risk of being positive for HR-HPVs compared to those with serum folate ≤6 ng/mL and serum vitamin B12 ≤ 356 pg/mL (odds ratio = 0.26; 95% confidence interval: 0.08–0.89; P = 0.03).
Conclusions:
These results demonstrated that improving folate and vitamin B12 status in Indian women may have a beneficial impact on the prevention of CC. Micronutrient based interventions for control of HR-HPV infections may represent feasible alternatives to vaccine based approaches to HPV disease prevention, which are currently unaffordable for use in resource limited areas in rural India.
PMCID: PMC2971743  PMID: 21072292
folate; vitamin B12; human papillomavirus; cervical cancer
17.  Planning and implementation of a participatory evaluation strategy: A viable approach in the evaluation of community-based participatory programs addressing cancer disparities 
Evaluation and program planning  2009;32(3):221-228.
Community-based participatory research (CBPR) has been posited as a promising methodology to address health concerns at the community level, including cancer disparities. However, the major criticism to this approach is the lack of scientific grounded evaluation methods to assess development and implementation of this type of research. This paper describes the process of development and implementation of a participatory evaluation framework within a CBPR program to reduce breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer disparities between African Americans and whites in Alabama and Mississippi as well as lessons learned. The participatory process involved community partners and academicians in a fluid process to identify common ground activities and outcomes. The logic model, a lay friendly approach, was used as the template and clearly outlined the steps to be taken in the evaluation process without sacrificing the rigorousness of the evaluation process. We have learned three major lessons in this process: (1) the importance of constant and open dialogue among partners; (2) flexibility to make changes in the evaluation plan and implementation; and (3) importance of evaluators playing the role of facilitators between the community and academicians. Despite the challenges, we offer a viable approach to evaluation of CBPR programs focusing on cancer disparities.
doi:10.1016/j.evalprogplan.2009.01.001
PMCID: PMC2833106  PMID: 19232727
Participatory evaluation; cancer disparities; community-based participatory research; logic model
18.  CCL25-CCR9 interaction modulates ovarian cancer cell migration, metalloproteinase expression, and invasion 
Background
Ovarian carcinoma (OvCa) is the most lethal gynecological malignancy among women and its poor prognosis is mainly due to metastasis. Chemokine receptor CCR9 is primarily expressed by a small subset of immune cells and its only natural ligand, CCL25, is largely expressed in the thymus, which involutes with age. Other than the thymus, CCL25 is expressed by the small bowel. Interactions between CCL25 and CCR9 have been implicated in leukocyte trafficking to the small bowel, a frequent metastatic site for OvCa cells. The current study shows OvCa tissue and cells significantly express CCR9, which interacts with CCL25 to support carcinoma cell migration and invasion.
Methods
RT-PCR and flow cytometry techniques were used to quantify the expression CCR9 by OvCa cells. OvCa tissue microarrays (TMA) was used to confirm CCR9 expression in clinical samples. The Aperio ScanScope scanning system was used to quantify immunohistochemical staining. Cell invasion and migration assays were performed using cell migration and matrigel invasion chambers. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) mRNAs were quantified by RT-PCR and active MMPs were quantified by ELISA.
Results
Our results show significantly (p < 0.001) higher expression of CCR9 by mucinous adenocarcinoma, papillary serous carcinoma, and endometriod ovarian carcinoma cases, than compared to non-neoplastic ovarian tissue. Furthermore, CCR9 expression was significantly elevated in OvCa cell lines (OVCAR-3 and CAOV-3) in comparison to normal adult ovarian epithelial cell mRNA. OvCa cells showed higher migratory and invasive potential towards chemotactic gradients of CCL25, which was inhibited by anti-CCR9 antibodies. Expression of collagenases (MMP-1, -8, and -13), gelatinases (MMP-2 and -9), and stromelysins (MMP-3, -10, and -11) by OvCa cells were modulated by CCL25 in a CCR9-dependent fashion.
Conclusions
These results demonstrate both biological significance and clinical relevance of CCL25 and CCR9 interactions in OvCa cell metastasis.
doi:10.1186/1477-7819-8-62
PMCID: PMC2927595  PMID: 20649989
19.  CCR9 interactions support ovarian cancer cell survival and resistance to cisplatin-induced apoptosis in a PI3K-dependent and FAK-independent fashion 
Background
Cisplatin is more often used to treat ovarian cancer (OvCa), which provides modest survival advantage primarily due to chemo-resistance and up regulated anti-apoptotic machineries in OvCa cells. Therefore, targeting the mechanisms responsible for cisplatin resistance in OvCa cell may improve therapeutic outcomes. We have shown that ovarian cancer cells express CC chemokine receptor-9 (CCR9). Others have also shown that CCL25, the only natural ligand for CCR9, up regulates anti-apoptotic proteins in immature T lymphocytes. Hence, it is plausible that CCR9-mediated cell signals might be involved in OvCa cell survival and inhibition of cisplatin-induced apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the potential role and molecular mechanisms of CCR9-mediated inhibition of cisplatin-induced apoptosis in OvCa cells.
Methods
Cell proliferation, vibrant apoptosis, and TUNEL assays were performed with or without cisplatin treatment in presence or absence of CCL25 to determine the role of the CCR9-CCL25 axis in cisplatin resistance. In situ Fast Activated cell-based ELISA (FACE) assays were performed to determine anti-apoptotic signaling molecules responsible for CCL25-CCR9 mediated survival.
Results
Our results show interactions between CCR9 and CCL25 increased anti-apoptotic signaling cascades in OvCa cells, which rescued cells from cisplatin-induced cell death. Specifically, CCL25-CCR9 interactions mediated Akt, activation as well as GSK-3β and FKHR phosphorylation in a PI3K-dependent and FAK-independent fashion.
Conclusions
Our results suggest the CCR9-CCL25 axis plays an important role in reducing cisplatin-induced apoptosis of OvCa cells.
doi:10.1186/1757-2215-3-15
PMCID: PMC2914045  PMID: 20565782
20.  Plasma Protein Profiles Differ Between Women Diagnosed with Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) 1 and 3 
Cancer Informatics  2007;2:345-349.
Early detection of precancerous cells in the cervix and their clinical management is the main purpose of cervical cancer prevention and treatment programs. Cytological findings or testing for high risk (HR)-human papillomavirus (HPV) are inadequately sensitive for use in triage of women at high risk for cervical cancer. The current study is an exploratory study to identify candidate surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization (SELDI) time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) protein profiles in plasma that may distinguish cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 3) from CIN 1 among women infected with HR-HPV. We evaluated the SELDI-TOF-MS plasma protein profiles of HR-HPV positive 32 women with CIN 3 (cases) and 28 women with CIN1 (controls). Case-control status was kept blinded and triplicates of each sample and quality control plasma samples were randomized and after robotic sample preparations were run on WCX2 chips. After alignment of mass/charge (m-z values), an iterative method was used to develop a classifier on a training data set that had 28 cases and 22 controls. The classifier developed was used to classify the subjects in a test data set that has six cases and six controls. The classifier separated the cases from controls in the test set with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity suggesting the possibility of using plasma SELDI protein profiles to identify women who are likely to have CIN 3 lesions.
PMCID: PMC2675504  PMID: 19458776
cervical; neoplasia; protein profiles; SELDI
21.  p53 and erbB-2 Are Not Associated in Matched Cases of Primary and Metastatic Ovarian Carcinomas 
Disease Markers  2004;19(1):11-17.
Ovarian cancer has a high mortality rate largely due to the limited number of ovarian carcinomas detected at an early stage. Understanding the molecular changes occurring during the progression of ovarian carcinoma would aid in the development of therapies that may inhibit or target metastasis. Primary and metastatic lesions from 54 and 40 patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma, respectively (including matched primary and metastatic lesions from 30 patients) were evaluated for nuclear accumulation of p53 (clone BP53-12-1) and cytoplasmic and membranous immunostaining of p185 erbB-2 (clone 3B5) by immunohistochemistry. No differences in the immunostaining of p53 and p185erbB-2 (cytoplasm or membrane) were observed between primary and metastatic lesions of the matched cases. Similarly, no differences in the proportion of positive cases of p53 between primary and metastatic lesions of the matched cases was observed. Thus, novel therapies that target p53 or p185erbB-2 can utilize specimens from either primary or metastatic lesions to characterize these targets prior to therapy. Spearman correlations between p53 and p185erbB-2 (cytoplasm or membrane) immunohistochemistry scores were insignificant for the matched cases, all primary lesions, and all metastatic lesions. Also, no significant associations occurred between nuclear accumulation of p53 (positive versus negative) and phenotypic expression of p185erbB-2 (cytoplasm or membrane) immunostaining scores for the matched cases, all primary lesions, and all metastatic lesions. Thus, the nuclear accumulation of p53 and immunostaining of p185erbB-2 in the cytoplasm or on the cellular membranes are independent.
doi:10.1155/2003/108643
PMCID: PMC3851095  PMID: 14757942
ovarian carcinoma; molecular markers; p53; and p185 erbB-2
22.  Predictors of Retention of African American Women in a Walking Program 
Objective
To predict retention of African American women 6 months after initiating a community walking program.
Methods
Demographics, health status, cancer-related health behaviors, and network membership data from baseline wellness questionnaires of 1322 African American women participating in the walking program were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression models.
Results
Seventy-eight percent (n=1032) of African American women were retained at 6 months. DSN membership was the primary predictor of retention.
Conclusions
Women affiliated with our comprehensive network, which provides ongoing cancer awareness, screening, and prevention programs to reduce cancer health disparities, were more likely to accomplish the first major milestone of the program.
PMCID: PMC3086025  PMID: 20950157
African American; women; retention; physical activity; cancer prevention and control
23.  Prevalence, incidence and natural history of simple ovarian cysts among women over age 55 in a large cancer screening trial 
Objective
To measure the occurrence and natural history of simple ovarian cysts in a cohort of older women.
Study Design
Simple cysts were ascertained among a cohort of 15,735 women from the intervention arm of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, through 4 years of transvaginal ultrasound screening.
Results
Simple cysts were seen in 14% of women the first time their ovaries were visualized. The one-year incidence of new simple cysts was 8%. Among ovaries with one simple cyst at the first screen, 54% retained one simple cyst, and 32% had no cyst one year later. Simple cysts did not increase risk of subsequent invasive ovarian cancer.
Conclusions
Simple ovarian cysts are fairly common among post-menopausal women, and most appear stable or resolve by the next annual exam. These findings support recent recommendations to follow unilocular simple cysts in post-menopausal women without intervention.
doi:10.1016/j.ajog.2009.11.029
PMCID: PMC2847634  PMID: 20096820
ovarian cancer; ovarian cysts; transvaginal ultrasound

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