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2.  490 Immunotherapy (IT) Training in Canada: Perspectives of Fellows-in-training on the First Immunotherapy Training Manual 
The World Allergy Organization Journal  2012;5(Suppl 2):S172-S173.
Background
Allergen immunotherapy (IT) is a key component of allergy practice, however fellows state that there is inadequate IT exposure during their training. In response, the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (CSACI) unveiled the first ever IT Training Manual for fellows-in-training at the annual 2010 CSACI meeting. The manual was distributed during a faculty-led teaching session. This was a pilot investigation to determine the perspectives of fellows in training about the IT training manual.
Methods
Canadian fellows-in-training in Allergy and Clinical Immunology (list derived from CSACI) were contacted via email to complete a survey (using survey monkey), both quantitative (Likert scales) and qualitative, to assess their opinion on the faculty-led session on IT and the IT Training Manual.
Results
Sixty-nine Canadian fellows-in-training were invited to complete the survey and 16 (23%). Fifty-four percent of 13 respondents were in their first year of fellowship. Seven respondents (58% of 12 respondents) attended the 2010 CSACI fellow-in-training session and received the IT Training Manual. One respondent commented that it was “more information than we've had in all of our fellowship!” The same 7 respondents “somewhat liked” or “liked” the large group format, but felt that the experience could be improved in the future with the addition of cased-based learning in smaller groups. One respondent commented that “as in intro, it was good in a larger setting.” All 7 respondents felt that their understanding of IT was positively impacted by the faculty-led session. Eighty-six percent of 7 respondents indicated that the Training Manual “somewhat impacted” to “very much impacted” their understanding of IT. One commenter stated that “it is the basis of my knowledge thus far.” Most respondents (86%) preferred the current paper booklet format of the IT Training Manual.
Conclusions
The results of this pilot survey demonstrate that some fellows-in-training found the faculty-led session on IT and the IT Training Manual useful. Future studies will help to further elucidate the utility of these 2 educational interventions.
doi:10.1097/01.WOX.0000411605.50432.2f
PMCID: PMC3512639
3.  491 Immunotherapy (IT) Training in Canada: Current Experience of Fellows-in-training 
Background
Allergen immunotherapy (IT) is a key component of allergy practice of allergy. Canadian fellows-in-training have expressed concern that they receive inadequate exposure to IT in their training programs.
Methods
Canadian fellows-in-training in Allergy and Clinical Immunology, identified through the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (CSACI), were contacted via email to complete a pilot survey (using survey monkey) to assess their exposure to, experience with, and comfort level in using IT.
Results
Sixty-nine Canadian fellows-in-training were invited to complete the survey and 16 (23%) completed at least part of the survey. Fifty-four percent of 13 respondents were in their first year of fellowship. Fifty percent of 12 respondents were internal medicine trained. Eighty-three percent of 12 respondents acknowledged exposure to IT during their training. Eighty percent of 10 respondents had previously written a prescription for IT; 71% and 43% of 7 respondents had written 1 to 5 prescriptions for aeroallergen and stinging venom IT, respectively. Only 50% of 12 respondents felt comfortable prescribing IT. The most common reason cited was lack of experience; however, one respondent wrote that he/she would feel uncomfortable prescribing IT without using the standardized hospital IT form. Sixty-seven percent of 12 respondents had previously administered IT to a patient. Sixteen percent of 12 respondents felt uncomfortable administering IT due to lack of experience. Fifty percent of 12 respondents had treated a patient having an allergic reaction to IT and 100% of these same respondents felt "somewhat comfortable" to "very comfortable" in responding to an allergic reaction to IT. Seventy-five percent of 12 respondents agreed that a formal clinical rotation in IT would be helpful.
Conclusions
The results of this pilot survey demonstrate that Canadian fellows-in-training in Allergy and Clinical Immunology are not receiving adequate exposure and training in IT. Future studies will help to explore this subject in more detail.
doi:10.1097/01.WOX.0000411606.27561.e2
PMCID: PMC3512924

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