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1.  Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genotypes and disability in hospitalized older patients 
Age  2010;33(3):409-419.
The association between angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genotypes and functional decline in older adults remains controversial. To assess if ACE gene variations influences functional abilities at older age, the present study explored the association between the common ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism and disability measured with activities of daily living (ADL) in hospitalized older patients. We analyzed the frequency of the ACE genotypes (I/I, I/D, and D/D) in a population of 2,128 hospitalized older patients divided according to presence or absence of ADL disability. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for possible confounding factors, identified an association between the I/I genotype with ADL disability (OR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.04–2.29). This association was significant in men (OR = 2.01, 95% CI 1.07–3.78), but not in women (OR = 1.36, 95% CI 0.82–2.25). These results suggested a possible role of the ACE polymorphism as a genetic marker for ADL disability in hospitalized older patients.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9192-2
PMCID: PMC3168594  PMID: 21076879
Angiotensin-converting enzyme; Disability; Aging; Hospitalized patients
2.  Apolipoprotein E-related all-cause mortality in hospitalized elderly patients 
Age  2010;32(3):411-420.
The most common apolipoprotein E (APOE) allelic variation is implicated in many age-related diseases and human longevity with controversial findings. We investigated the effect of APOE gene polymorphism on all-cause mortality in elderly patients taking into consideration the functional disability, cognitive impairment, malnutrition, and the occurrence of common age-related diseases. APOE genotypes were determined in 2,124 geriatric hospitalized patients (46.5% men and 53.5% women; mean age, 78.2 ± 7.1 years; range, 65–100 years). At hospital admission, all patients underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment to evaluate functional disability, cognitive status, nutritional status, and comorbidity. The main and secondary diagnoses at hospital discharge were also recorded. Mortality status was evaluated in all patients after a maximum follow-up of 5 years (range, from 1.26 to 5.23 years; median, 2.86 years). During the study period, 671 patients died (32.0%). At hospital admission, these patients showed a significant higher prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (56.3% vs 53.4%; p = 0.007), neoplasias (32.3% vs 13.7%; p < 0.001), and lower prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases (17.7% vs 20.7%; p < 0.001) than survived patients. Moreover, they also showed an higher prevalence of disability (52.0% vs 25.6%; p < 0.001), cognitive impairment (31.0% vs 18.8%; p < 0.001), and malnutrition (74.0% vs 46.1%; p < 0.001) than survived patients. In the overall study population, the APOE ε2 allele was significantly associated to neurodegenerative diseases (odds ratio = 0.59; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.37–0.94). No significant association between the APOE polymorphism and disability, malnutrition, co-morbidity status, and with all-cause mortality was observed. In patients with cardiovascular diseases, however, a decreased risk of all-cause mortality was found in the ε2 allele carriers (hazard ratio = 0.56; 95% CI, 0.36–0.88). In this population, APOE allele variants might play a role on cardiovascular disease-related mortality.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9144-x
PMCID: PMC2926860  PMID: 20640544
Apolipoprotein E; Mortality; Cardiovascular aging; Dementia
3.  Association of Apolipoprotein E and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Gene Polymorphisms with the Multidimensional Impairment in Older Patients 
Rejuvenation research  2009;12(4):239-247.
The role of the apoliprotein E (APOE) and the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) polymorphisms on health and functional status deterioration in old age is still undefined. Recently, a Multidimensional Prognostic Index (MPI) for 1-year mortality derived from a Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) was developed and validated in hospitalized elderly patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association of the APOE and ACE gene polymorphisms with the multidimensional impairment, as evaluated by the MPI, in older patients. These polymorphisms were assessed in 1894 geriatric inpatients divided into three groups according to their MPI values: MPI-1 low risk (n = 988), MPI-2 moderate risk (n = 671), and MPI-3 severe risk of mortality (n = 235). A slight deviation from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium was observed for the APOE genotypes. With the increasing of the MPI grade, a significant increase in the frequencies of ε4 allele and the ACE D/D genotype was observed. The APOE ε4+ and ACE D/D genotypes were associated with severe MPI grade (APOE ε4+, odds ration [OR] = 1.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20–2.67; ACE D/D, OR = 1.42, 95% CI 1.05–1.92). The combined APOE ε4+ and ACE D/D genetic status was associated with higher MPI grade (OR = 2.85, 95% CI 1.75–4.65), without interaction. No significant associations between APOE and ACE polymorphisms and 2-year mortality were found. APOE and ACE genes might predispose individuals to health and functional status deterioration in old age, and their effect is additive.
doi:10.1089/rej.2009.0858
PMCID: PMC2868322  PMID: 19653879
4.  Association of Apolipoprotein E and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Gene Polymorphisms with the Multidimensional Impairment in Older Patients 
Rejuvenation Research  2009;12(4):239-247.
Abstract
The role of the apoliprotein E (APOE) and the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) polymorphisms on health and functional status deterioration in old age is still undefined. Recently, a Multidimensional Prognostic Index (MPI) for 1-year mortality derived from a Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) was developed and validated in hospitalized elderly patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association of the APOE and ACE gene polymorphisms with the multidimensional impairment, as evaluated by the MPI, in older patients. These polymorphisms were assessed in 1894 geriatric inpatients divided into three groups according to their MPI values: MPI-1 low risk (n = 988), MPI-2 moderate risk (n = 671), and MPI-3 severe risk of mortality (n = 235). A slight deviation from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium was observed for the APOE genotypes. With the increasing of the MPI grade, a significant increase in the frequencies of ɛ4 allele and the ACE D/D genotype was observed. The APOE ɛ4+ and ACE D/D genotypes were associated with severe MPI grade (APOE ɛ4+, odds ration [OR] = 1.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20–2.67; ACE D/D, OR = 1.42, 95% CI 1.05–1.92). The combined APOE ɛ4+ and ACE D/D genetic status was associated with higher MPI grade (OR = 2.85, 95% CI 1.75–4.65), without interaction. No significant associations between APOE and ACE polymorphisms and 2-year mortality were found. APOE and ACE genes might predispose individuals to health and functional status deterioration in old age, and their effect is additive.
doi:10.1089/rej.2009.0858
PMCID: PMC2868322  PMID: 19653879

Results 1-4 (4)