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1.  Inactivation of RARβ inhibits Wnt1-induced mammary tumorigenesis by suppressing epithelial-mesenchymal transition 
Retinoic acid receptor β (RARβ) has been proposed to act as a tumor suppressor in breast cancer. In contrast, recent data have shown that RARβ promotes ERBB2-induced mammary gland tumorigenesis through remodeling of the stromal compartment and activation of cancer-associated fibroblasts. However, it is currently unknown whether RARβ oncogenic activity is specific to ERBB2-induced tumors, or whether it influences the initiation and progression of other breast cancer subtypes. Accordingly, we set out to investigate the involvement of RARβ in basal-like breast cancer using mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-wingless-related integration site 1 (Wnt1)-induced mammary gland tumorigenesis as a model system. We found that compared with wild type mice, inactivation of Rarb resulted in a lengthy delay in Wnt1-induced mammary gland tumorigenesis and in a significantly slower tumor growth rate. Ablation of Rarb altered the composition of the stroma, repressed the activation of cancer-associated fibroblasts, and reduced the recruitment of inflammatory cells and angiogenesis. Reduced expression of IGF-1 and activity of its downstream signaling pathway contribute to attenuate EMT in the Rarb-null tumors. Our results show that, in the absence of retinoid signaling via RARβ, reduced IGF-1 signaling results in suppression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and delays tumorigenesis induced by the Wnt1 oncogene. Accordingly, our work reinforces the concept that antagonizing RARβ-dependent retinoid signaling could provide a therapeutic avenue to treat poor outcome breast cancers.
doi:10.1621/nrs.12004
PMCID: PMC4242291  PMID: 25422594
Breast cancer; IGF-1; nuclear receptor; oncogene; retinoid
2.  The age of heterozygosity 
Age  2006;28(2):201-208.
Two mutant mouse models of longevity in which the loss of only one copy of the gene leads to a significantly increased lifespan have recently been described: Igf1r+/- and mclk1+/-. Igf1r encodes a transmembrane receptor kinase for the insulin-like growth factor-1, and mclk1 encodes a hydroxylase that is necessary for the biosynthesis of ubiquinone. Interestingly, the motivation for testing the longevity of both of these mutants came from observations in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. IGF-1R protein is homologous to DAF-2 and mCLK1 is the mouse orthologue of the C. elegans enzyme CLK-1. In worms, the homozygous inactivation of both of these longevity genes is viable and no dominant mutations are known. In addition to aging slowly, old mclk1+/- mice were found to undergo loss-of-heterozygosity at the mclk1 locus, which results in clones of mclk1-/- cells in the liver, presumably because mclk1-/- cells can outcompete mclk1+/- cells under certain conditions. We will discuss how these observations suggest novel directions of research, but also call for some caution in the interpretation of past and future results.
doi:10.1007/s11357-006-9006-8
PMCID: PMC2464728  PMID: 19943141
aging; evolutionary conservation; loss-of-heterozygosity; mclk1; mouse models of longevity; ubiquinone

Results 1-2 (2)