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author:("lepista, gyri")
1.  Biomechanical Factors in Planning of Periacetabular Osteotomy 
Objective: This study addresses the effects of cartilage thickness distribution and compressive properties in the context of optimal alignment planning for periacetabular osteotomy (PAO).
Background: The Biomechanical Guidance System (BGS) is a computer-assisted surgical suite assisting surgeon’s in determining the most beneficial new alignment of a patient’s acetabulum. The BGS uses biomechanical analysis of the hip to find this optimal alignment. Articular cartilage is an essential component of this analysis and its physical properties can affect contact pressure outcomes.
Methods: Patient-specific hip joint models created from CT scans of a cohort of 29 dysplastic subjects were tested with four different cartilage thickness profiles (one uniform and three non-uniform) and two sets of compressive characteristics. For each combination of thickness distribution and compressive properties, the optimal alignment of the acetabulum was found; the resultant geometric and biomechanical characterization of the hip were compared among the optimal alignments.
Results: There was an average decrease of 49.2 ± 22.27% in peak contact pressure from the preoperative to the optimal alignment over all patients. We observed an average increase of 19 ± 7.7° in center-edge angle and an average decrease of 19.5 ± 8.4° in acetabular index angle from the preoperative case to the optimized plan. The optimal alignment increased the lateral coverage of the femoral head and decreased the obliqueness of the acetabular roof in all patients. These anatomical observations were independent of the choice for either cartilage thickness profile, or compressive properties.
Conclusion: While patient-specific acetabular morphology is essential for surgeons in planning PAO, the predicted optimal alignment of the acetabulum was not significantly sensitive to the choice of cartilage thickness distribution over the acetabulum. However, in all groups the biomechanically predicted optimal alignment resulted in decreased joint contact pressure and improved acetabular coverage.
doi:10.3389/fbioe.2013.00020
PMCID: PMC4126379  PMID: 25152876
periacetabular osteotomy; preoperative planning; articular cartilage thickness; cartilage compressibility; biomechanical analysis
2.  Periacetabular osteotomy in adult hip dysplasia – developing a computer aided real-time biomechanical guiding system (BGS) 
Osteotomies around hip acetabulum have become a routine surgical intervention in cases with constant pain without joint degeneration in adult dysplasia. However, it remains a challenge to plan and realign optimally the joint after osteotomy to reach best function and longevity in the clinical outcome. Tool tracking navigation systems have been available for many years but they have not become popular among surgeons because they extend operation time, require preoperative CT scan and, on the other hand, produce only marginal advantage in hands of an experienced surgeon. Real-time biomechanical assessment, based on computer analysis using preoperative CT-scanning, has become an interesting means to adjust the acetabular reorientation during surgery according to the patient’s individual structure and loading conditions. Further, real-time feedback allows the surgeon to foresee radiographic angles while performing fixation of the osteotomized fragment. Assessment of peak pressure and potential weight bearing area in real-time allows prospective and retrospective systematic biomechanical studies of patient outcomes. To conclude, a major development in navigation software is under way and we have so far seen a spectrum of new features like loading condition assessment in real time for osteotomies. This is, however, merely the start of a revolutionary change in operative planning in orthopaedics with the help of computer aided guiding and bioengineering.
PMCID: PMC2873027  PMID: 20490364
3.  Outcome of periacetabular osteotomy 
Acta orthopaedica  2005;76(3):303-313.
Background
Due to wide variations in acetabular structure of individuals with hip dysplasia, the measurement of the acetabular orientation may not be sufficient to predict the joint loading and pressure distribution across the joint. Addition of mechanical analysis to preoperative planning, therefore, has the potential to improve the clinical outcome.
We analyzed the effect of periacetabular osteotomy on hip dysplasia using computer-aided simulation of joint contact pressure on regular AP radiographs. The results were compared with the results of surgery based on realignment of acetabular angles to the normal hip.
Patients and methods
We studied 12 consecutive periacetabular osteotomies with no femoral head deformity. The median age of patients, all females, was 35 (20−50) years. The median follow-up was 2 years (1.3−2.2). Patient outcome was measured with the total score of a self-administered questionnaire (q-score) and with the Harris hip score. The pre- and postoperative orientation of the acetabulum was defined using reconstructed 3D CT-slices to measure angles in the three anatomical planes. Peak contact pressure, weight-bearing area, and the centroid of the contact pressure distribution (CP-ratio) were calculated.
Results
While 9 of 12 cases showed decreased peak pressure after surgery, the mean changes in weight-bearing area and peak contact pressure were not statistically significant. However, CP-ratio changed (p < 0.001, paired t-test) with surgery. For the optimal range of CP-ratio (within its mid-range 40−60%), the mechanical outcome improved significantly.
Interpretation
Verifying the correlation between the optimal CP-ratio and the outcome of the surgery requires additional studies on more patients. Moreover, the anatomically measured angles were not correlated with the ranges of CP-ratio, suggesting that they do not always associate with objective mechanical goals of realignment osteotomy. Mechanical analysis, therefore, can be a valuable tool in assessing two-dimensional radiographs in hip dysplasia.
PMCID: PMC2745131  PMID: 16156455
4.  Three-dimensional mechanical evaluation of joint contact pressure in 12 periacetabular osteotomy patients with 10-year follow-up 
Acta orthopaedica  2009;80(2):155-161.
Background and purpose
Because of the varying structure of dysplastic hips, the optimal realignment of the joint during periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) may differ between patients. Three-dimensional (3D) mechanical and radiological analysis possibly accounts better for patient-specific morphology, and may improve and automate optimal joint realignment.
Patients and methods
We evaluated the 10-year outcomes of 12 patients following PAO. We compared 3D mechanical analysis results to both radiological and clinical measurements. A 3D discrete-element analysis algorithm was used to calculate the pre- and postoperative contact pressure profile within the hip. Radiological angles describing the coverage of the joint were measured using a computerized approach at actual and theoretical orientations of the acetabular cup. Quantitative results were compared using postoperative clinical evaluation scores (Harris score), and patient-completed outcome surveys (q-score) done at 2 and 10 years.
Results
The 3D mechanical analysis indicated that peak joint contact pressure was reduced by an average factor of 1.7 subsequent to PAO. Lateral coverage of the femoral head increased in all patients; however, it did not proportionally reduce the maximum contact pressure and, in 1 case, the pressure increased. This patient had the lowest 10-year q-score (70 out of 100) of the cohort. Another hip was converted to hip arthroplasty after 3 years because of increasing osteoarthritis.
Interpretation
The 3D analysis showed that a reduction in contact pressure was theoretically possible for all patients in this cohort, but this could not be achieved in every case during surgery. While intraoperative factors may affect the actual surgical outcome, the results show that 3D contact pressure analysis is consistent with traditional PAO planning techniques (more so than 2D analysis) and may be a valuable addition to preoperative planning and intraoperative assessment of joint realignment.
doi:10.3109/17453670902947390
PMCID: PMC2689368  PMID: 19404795
5.  Three-dimensional mechanical evaluation of joint contact pressure in 12 periacetabular osteotomy patients with 10-year follow-up 
Acta Orthopaedica  2009;80(2):155-161.
Background and purpose Because of the varying structure of dysplastic hips, the optimal realignment of the joint during periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) may differ between patients. Three-dimensional (3D) mechanical and radiological analysis possibly accounts better for patient-specific morphology, and may improve and automate optimal joint realignment.
Patients and methods We evaluated the 10-year outcomes of 12 patients following PAO. We compared 3D mechanical analysis results to both radiological and clinical measurements. A 3D discrete-element analysis algorithm was used to calculate the pre- and postoperative contact pressure profile within the hip. Radiological angles describing the coverage of the joint were measured using a computerized approach at actual and theoretical orientations of the acetabular cup. Quantitative results were compared using postoperative clinical evaluation scores (Harris score), and patient-completed outcome surveys (q-score) done at 2 and 10 years.
Results The 3D mechanical analysis indicated that peak joint contact pressure was reduced by an average factor of 1.7 subsequent to PAO. Lateral coverage of the femoral head increased in all patients; however, it did not proportionally reduce the maximum contact pressure and, in 1 case, the pressure increased. This patient had the lowest 10-year q-score (70 out of 100) of the cohort. Another hip was converted to hip arthroplasty after 3 years because of increasing osteoarthritis.
Interpretation The 3D analysis showed that a reduction in contact pressure was theoretically possible for all patients in this cohort, but this could not be achieved in every case during surgery. While intraoperative factors may affect the actual surgical outcome, the results show that 3D contact pressure analysis is consistent with traditional PAO planning techniques (more so than 2D analysis) and may be a valuable addition to preoperative planning and intraoperative assessment of joint realignment.
doi:10.3109/17453670902947390
PMCID: PMC2689368  PMID: 19404795

Results 1-5 (5)