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1.  New immunohistochemical method for improved myotonia and chloride channel mutation diagnostics 
Neurology  2012;79(22):2194-2200.
Objective:
The objective of this study was to validate the immunohistochemical assay for the diagnosis of nondystrophic myotonia and to provide full clarification of clinical disease to patients in whom basic genetic testing has failed to do so.
Methods:
An immunohistochemical assay of sarcolemmal chloride channel abundance using 2 different ClC1-specific antibodies.
Results:
This method led to the identification of new mutations, to the reclassification of W118G in CLCN1 as a moderately pathogenic mutation, and to confirmation of recessive (Becker) myotonia congenita in cases when only one recessive CLCN1 mutation had been identified by genetic testing.
Conclusions:
We have developed a robust immunohistochemical assay that can detect loss of sarcolemmal ClC-1 protein on muscle sections. This in combination with gene sequencing is a powerful approach to achieving a final diagnosis of nondystrophic myotonia.
doi:10.1212/WNL.0b013e31827595e2
PMCID: PMC3570820  PMID: 23152584
2.  TARDBP mutations are not a frequent cause of ALS in Finnish patients 
Acta Myologica  2012;31(2):134-138.
In previous studies 1-3 % of ALS patients have TARDBP mutations as the cause of the disease. TARDBP mutations have been reported in ALS patients in different populations but so far there are no studies on the frequency of TARDBP mutations in Finnish ALS patients. A cohort of 50 Finnish patients, 44 SALS and 6 FALS patients, were included in the study. Genomic DNA was extracted from venous blood or muscle tissue and a mutation analysis of TARDBP was performed. No definitely pathogenic mutations could be identified in TARDBP in our patient cohort. However, two previously unknown variations were found: one silent mutation in exon 2 and one relatively deep intronic single nucleotide insertion in intron 5. In addition, two previously known non-pathogenic polymorphisms in intron 5 were detected. The size of our cohort is obviously not large enough to conclusively exclude TARDBP mutations as a very rare cause of ALS in Finland. However, based on our results TARDBP mutations do not appear to be a frequent cause of familial or sporadic ALS in Finland.
PMCID: PMC3476858  PMID: 23097605
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; mutation screening; TARDBP
3.  Population frequency of myotonic dystrophy: higher than expected frequency of myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) mutation in Finland 
Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the most common adult-onset muscular dystrophy with an estimated prevalence of 1/8000. There are two genetically distinct types, DM1 and DM2. DM2 is generally milder with more phenotypic variability than the classic DM1. Our previous data on co-segregation of heterozygous recessive CLCN1 mutations in DM2 patients indicated a higher than expected DM2 prevalence. The aim of this study was to determine the DM2 and DM1 frequency in the general population, and to explore whether the DM2 mutation functions as a modifier in other neuromuscular diseases (NMD) to account for unexplained phenotypic variability. We genotyped 5535 Finnish individuals: 4532 normal blood donors, 606 patients with various non-myotonic NMD, 221 tibial muscular dystrophy patients and their 176 healthy relatives for the DM2 and DM1 mutations. We also genotyped an Italian idiopathic non-myotonic proximal myopathy cohort (n=93) for the DM2 mutation. In 5496 samples analyzed for DM2, we found three DM2 mutations and two premutations. In 5511 samples analyzed for DM1, we found two DM1 mutations and two premutations. In the Italian cohort, we identified one patient with a DM2 mutation. We conclude that the DM2 mutation frequency is significantly higher in the general population (1/1830; P-value=0.0326) than previously estimated. The identification of DM2 mutations in NMD patients with clinical phenotypes not previously associated with DM2 is of particular interest and is in accord with the high overall prevalence. On the basis of our results, DM2 appears more frequent than DM1, with most DM2 patients currently undiagnosed with symptoms frequently occurring in the elderly population.
doi:10.1038/ejhg.2011.23
PMCID: PMC3137497  PMID: 21364698
myotonic dystrophy; mutation frequency; prevalence; population
4.  Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2 Found in Two of Sixty-Three Persons Diagnosed as Having Fibromyalgia 
Arthritis and rheumatism  2008;58(11):3627-3631.
Because of its high prevalence, fibromyalgia (FM) is a major general health issue. Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is a recently described autosomal-dominant multisystem disorder. Besides variable proximal muscle weakness, myotonia, and precocious cataracts, muscle pain and stiffness are prominent presenting features of DM2. After noting that several of our mutation-positive DM2 patients had a previous diagnosis of FM, suggesting that DM2 may be misdiagnosed as FM, we invited 90 randomly selected patients diagnosed as having FM to undergo genetic testing for DM2. Of the 63 patients who agreed to participate, 2 (3.2%) tested positive for the DM2 mutation. Their cases are described herein. DM2 was not found in any of 200 asymptomatic controls. We therefore suggest that the presence of DM2 should be investigated in a large sample of subjects diagnosed as having FM, and clinicians should be aware of overlap in the clinical presentation of these 2 distinct disorders.
doi:10.1002/art.24037
PMCID: PMC2585600  PMID: 18975316

Results 1-4 (4)