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2.  On the need for an international effort to capture, share and use crystallization screening data 
Development of an ontology for the description of crystallization experiments and results is proposed.
When crystallization screening is conducted many outcomes are observed but typically the only trial recorded in the literature is the condition that yielded the crystal(s) used for subsequent diffraction studies. The initial hit that was optimized and the results of all the other trials are lost. These missing results contain information that would be useful for an improved general understanding of crystallization. This paper provides a report of a crystallization data exchange (XDX) workshop organized by several international large-scale crystallization screening laboratories to discuss how this information may be captured and utilized. A group that administers a significant fraction of the world’s crystallization screening results was convened, together with chemical and structural data informaticians and computational scientists who specialize in creating and analysing large disparate data sets. The development of a crystallization ontology for the crystallization community was proposed. This paper (by the attendees of the workshop) provides the thoughts and rationale leading to this conclusion. This is brought to the attention of the wider audience of crystallographers so that they are aware of these early efforts and can contribute to the process going forward.
doi:10.1107/S1744309112002618
PMCID: PMC3310524  PMID: 22442216
crystallization screening data; crystallization ontology
4.  Foreign Language Translation of Chemical Nomenclature by Computer 
Chemical compound names remain the primary method for conveying molecular structures between chemists and researchers. In research articles, patents, chemical catalogues, government legislation, and textbooks, the use of IUPAC and traditional compound names is universal, despite efforts to introduce more machine-friendly representations such as identifiers and line notations. Fortunately, advances in computing power now allow chemical names to be parsed and generated (read and written) with almost the same ease as conventional connection tables. A significant complication, however, is that although the vast majority of chemistry uses English nomenclature, a significant fraction is in other languages. This complicates the task of filing and analyzing chemical patents, purchasing from compound vendors, and text mining research articles or Web pages. We describe some issues with manipulating chemical names in various languages, including British, American, German, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, Swedish, Polish, and Hungarian, and describe the current state-of-the-art in software tools to simplify the process.
doi:10.1021/ci800243w
PMCID: PMC2659868  PMID: 19239237
5.  Using Matched Molecular Series as a Predictive Tool To Optimize Biological Activity 
Journal of Medicinal Chemistry  2014;57(6):2704-2713.
A matched molecular series is the general form of a matched molecular pair and refers to a set of two or more molecules with the same scaffold but different R groups at the same position. We describe Matsy, a knowledge-based method that uses matched series to predict R groups likely to improve activity given an observed activity order for some R groups. We compare the Matsy predictions based on activity data from ChEMBLdb to the recommendations of the Topliss tree and carry out a large scale retrospective test to measure performance. We show that the basis for predictive success is preferred orders in matched series and that this preference is stronger for longer series. The Matsy algorithm allows medicinal chemists to integrate activity trends from diverse medicinal chemistry programs and apply them to problems of interest as a Topliss-like recommendation or as a hypothesis generator to aid compound design.
doi:10.1021/jm500022q
PMCID: PMC3968889  PMID: 24601597

Results 1-5 (5)