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1.  Antidepressant Activity of Methanolic Extract of Amaranthus Spinosus 
Introduction
Depressive disorder is a prevalent psychiatric disorder, which affects 21% of the world population. The presently using drugs can impose a variety of side-effects including cardiac toxicity, hypopiesia, sexual dysfunction, body weight gain, and sleep disorder. During the last decade, there is a growing interest in the therapeutic effects of natural products on mental disorders. Amaranthus spinosus was investigation for antidepressant activity.
Methods
Antidepressant activity of methanolic extract of Amaranthus spinosus (MEAS) was investigated by using Forced swimming test (FST) and Tail suspension test (TST) models. Escitalopram and Imipramine were used as reference standards.
Results
It has been observed from our study that both the MEAS at higher concentration showed significant (p<0.01) reduction in immobility in tail suspension and forced swim model of depression comparable to Escitalopram and Imipramine.
Discussion
However further study is needed to understand mechanism of action and to identify active component responsible for antidepressant like activity.
PMCID: PMC4202599  PMID: 25436078
Antidepressant Activity; Amaranthus Spinosus; Escitalopram; Imipramine
2.  Crystal structure of (E)-N-phenyl-N′-[1-(thio­phen-2-yl)ethyl­idene]formo­hydrazide 
In the title compound, C13H12N2OS, the planes of the thio­phene and phenyl rings are nearly perpendicular to each other, making a dihedral angle of 86.42 (12)°. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a helical chain along the b-axis direction.
doi:10.1107/S1600536814016511
PMCID: PMC4186119  PMID: 25309259
crystal structure; thio­phene derivative; hydrogen bonding
3.  Lipoprotein Ratios as Surrogate Markers for Insulin Resistance in South Indians with Normoglycemic Nondiabetic Acute Coronary Syndrome 
ISRN Endocrinology  2014;2014:981524.
Background. Insulin resistance has been associated with dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. Even though homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) is a well-known insulin resistance predictor, estimation of serum lipoprotein ratios has been recently suggested as a surrogate marker for insulin resistance. Here, we evaluated the relationship between lipoprotein ratios and insulin resistance in normoglycemic nondiabetic south Indians with acute coronary syndrome. Methods. 100 normoglycemic nondiabetic ACS patients and 140 controls were enrolled in the study. Levels of fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and lipid profile [total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C)], lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels were measured and lipoprotein ratios were computed. HOMA-IR was used to calculate the insulin resistance. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) analysis was used to compare the power of these lipoprotein ratios to predict insulin resistance. Results. Lipoprotein ratios were significantly higher in normoglycemic nondiabetic ACS patients, as compared to healthy controls, and were significantly correlated with HOMA-IR by Spearman's rank correlation analysis. ROC curve showed that Lp(a)/HDL-C and TG/HDL-C ratios were the best surrogate predictors of insulin resistance in normoglycemic nondiabetic ACS. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that serum lipoprotein ratios significantly correlate with insulin resistance in normoglycemic nondiabetic ACS. Lp(a)/HDL-C and TG/HDL-C ratios could be used as surrogate markers of insulin resistance in atherosclerosis-prone south Indians with normoglycemic nondiabetic ACS.
doi:10.1155/2014/981524
PMCID: PMC4052181  PMID: 24959351
4.  Revisiting the Role of First Trimester Homocysteine as an Index of Maternal and Fetal Outcome 
Journal of Pregnancy  2014;2014:123024.
Aim. To revisit the role of first trimester homocysteine levels with the maternal and fetal outcome. Methods. This was a cohort study comprising 100 antenatal women between 8 and 12 weeks of gestation. Serum homocysteine levels were checked after overnight fasting. Results. There were significantly elevated homocysteine levels among women with prior history of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and prior second or third trimester pregnancy losses. There was no significant difference in homocysteine levels among women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus, preterm deliveries, or fetal malformations. Homocysteine levels were significantly elevated in those who developed hypertensive disorder of pregnancy, oligohydramnios, and meconium stained amniotic fluid, had a pregnancy loss, or delivered a low birth weight baby. There was no significant difference in homocysteine levels for those who developed gestational diabetes mellitus. Conclusions. Increased first trimester serum homocysteine is associated with history of pregnancy losses, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, and preterm birth. This is also associated with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, pregnancy loss, oligohydramnios, meconium stained amniotic fluid, and low birth weight in the current pregnancy. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov CTRI/2013/02/003441.
doi:10.1155/2014/123024
PMCID: PMC4027023  PMID: 24883207
5.  (4-Fluoro­phen­yl)(2-hy­droxy-5-methyl­phen­yl)methanone 
In the title compound, C14H11FO2, the dihedral angles beteen the central C3O ketone residue and the fluoro- and hy­droxy-substituted benzene rings are 50.44 (9) and 12.63 (10)°, respectively. The planes of the benzene rings subtend a dihedral angle of 58.88 (9)° and an intra­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bond closes an S(6) ring. No directional inter­actions beyond van der Waals packing contacts were identified in the crystal structure.
doi:10.1107/S1600536814001883
PMCID: PMC3998389  PMID: 24764995
6.  (4-Fluoro­phen­yl)(4-hy­droxy-3-methyl­phen­yl)methanone 
In the title compound, C14H11FO2, the two benzene rings are not coplanar, with a dihedral angle of 57.45 (12)° between their planes. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by an O—H⋯O hydrogen bond, forming a 21 helical chain along the b axis.
doi:10.1107/S1600536813033783
PMCID: PMC3914103  PMID: 24527008
7.  (4-Hy­droxy-3,5-di­methyl­phen­yl)(phen­yl)methanone 
In the mol­ecule of the title compound, C15H14O2, the dihedral angle between the benzene and phenyl rings is 61.27 (8)°. In the crystal, O—H⋯O and weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the mol­ecules into chains extending along the c-axis direction.
doi:10.1107/S1600536813028444
PMCID: PMC3884333  PMID: 24454109
8.  An unusual cause of progressive quadriparesis 
Thyroid carcinoma is a rare cause of compressive myelopathy. Quadriparesis as the presenting manifestation of follicular carcinoma of thyroid without any preceding features of malignancy is quite uncommon. We describe a case of a 55-year-old woman who presented with progressive quadriparesis of 2 months duration, on evaluation was found to have a large tumor destroying C1, C2 vertebrae and occupying craniovertebral junction. Histopathological examination of excised tumor was follicular thyroid carcinoma. She was successfully managed with surgical excision, stabilization of spine followed by radiotherapy.
doi:10.4103/2230-8210.119555
PMCID: PMC3830287  PMID: 24251141
Follicular thyroid cancer; metastasis; quadriparesis
9.  (4-Hy­droxy-3-methyl­phen­yl)(phen­yl)methanone 
In the title compound, C14H12O2, the benzene rings make a dihedral angle of 58.84 (12)°. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked into chains along the b-axis direction by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. These chains are further linked by C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming layers parallel to the bc plane.
doi:10.1107/S160053681302521X
PMCID: PMC3790415  PMID: 24098234
10.  Comparative evaluation of single and bilayered lamotrigine floating tablets 
Aim:
The purpose of this study was to prepare lamotrigine (LM) bilayered and single layered floating tablets and to compare their release profiles.
Materials and Methods:
LM floating tablets were prepared by direct compression method. Drug, hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose K4M, lactose monohydrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 constitute controlled release layer components and floating layer components includes polymers and sodium bicarbonate. The prepared tablets were evaluated for physicochemical parameters such as hardness, friability, weight variation, thickness, floating lag time (FLT), floating time, in vitro buoyancy study, in vitro release studies. The drug-polymer interaction was studied by fourier transform infrared and differential scanning calorimetry.
Results and Discussion:
The FLT of all the formulations were within the prescribed limits (<3 min). When ethyl cellulose was used as floating layer component, tablets showed good buoyancy effect but eroded within 6-8 h. Hence it was replaced with hydroxypropyl cellulose -M hydrophilic polymer, which showed good FLT and floating duration for 16 h. Formulation LFC4 was found to be optimized with dissolution profile of zero order kinetics showing fickian diffusion. A comparative study of bilayered and single layered tablets of LM showed a highest similarity factor of 83.03, difference factor of 2.74 and t-test (P < 0.05) indicates that there is no significant difference between them.
Conclusion:
Though bilayered tablet possess many advantages, single layered tablet would be economical, cost-effective and reproducible for large scale production in the industry. However, the results of present study demonstrated that the in vitro development of bilayered gastro retentive floating tablets with controlled drug release profile for LM is feasible.
doi:10.4103/2230-973X.119227
PMCID: PMC3807983  PMID: 24167788
Epilepsy; gastro retentive drug delivery system; hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose
11.  (R)-2-Cyano-N-(1-phenyl­eth­yl)acetamide 
In the title compound, C11H12N2O, the dihedral angle between the acetamide group and the benzene ring is 68.7 (1)°. In the crystal, N—H⋯O and weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the mol­ecules into chains along the a-axis direction.
doi:10.1107/S1600536813008131
PMCID: PMC3647851  PMID: 23723817
12.  Ethyl 2-(quinolin-8-yl­oxy)acetate monohydrate 
In the title compound, C13H13NO3·H2O, the dihedral angle between the ethyl ester group [C—C—O—C(=O); maximum deviation = 0.003 (2) Å] and the quinoline ring system is 7.94 (12)°. The water solvent mol­ecule is linked to the title mol­ecule via O—H⋯O and O—H⋯N hydrogen bonds. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming chains propagating along [100].
doi:10.1107/S1600536813008106
PMCID: PMC3629657  PMID: 23634144
13.  5-Bromo-2-chloro­pyrimidin-4-amine 
In the title compound, C4H3BrClN3, the pyrimidine ring is essentially planar (r.m.s. deviation from the plane = 0.087 Å). In the crystal, pairs of N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds connect the mol­ecules into inversion dimers; these are connected by further N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds into a two-dimensional framework parallel to the bc plane.
doi:10.1107/S1600536813007228
PMCID: PMC3629628  PMID: 23634115
14.  Safety Assessment of TLPL/AY/03/2008, A Polyherbal Formulation in Sprague Dawley Rats 
Toxicology International  2013;20(1):77-86.
Objectives:
TLPL/AY/03/2008 is a polyherbal formulation intended for treatment of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, lumbago, spondylitis etc., Acute and repeated dose 90-days studies were conducted to evaluate the safety profile of TLPL/AY/03/2008 in rats.
Materials and Methods:
In acute study, TLPL/AY/03/2008 was orally administered to Sprague Dawley rats at 2000 mg/kg. In repeated dose study, TLPL/AY/03/2008 was administered to rats at 200, 500 and 1000 mg/kg through oral gavage for 90 days and assessed for treatment related changes in body weight, feed consumption, hematological, biochemical and pathological parameters. Histopathological examination was conducted for tissues from control and the high dose groups and was extended to target organs from the lower dose and recovery groups.
Results:
In acute study, the test item did not produce any mortality or adverse clinical signs. In the 90-days oral toxicity study, animals did not exhibit any toxicity symptoms and no deaths were observed. No significant changes were found in hematological and biochemical endpoints. Also, toxicologically significant alterations in relative organ weights were not observed. Microscopic findings of mild to marked, diffuse hepatocellular degeneration (vacuolar changes with granular of cytoplasm and pyknotic nuclei of hepatocytes) was noticed in males at 1000 mg/kg body weight. Animals of recovery group (1000 mg/kg) did not show any changes when compared with control group animals indicating the complete reversal.
Conclusions:
Based on the findings of the study, the median lethal dose of TLPL/AY/03/2008 was found to be more than 2000 mg/kg. The No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) of TLPL/AY/03/2008 can be considered as 1000 mg/kg in both male and female rats, under the experimental conditions and doses employed.
doi:10.4103/0971-6580.111539
PMCID: PMC3702132  PMID: 23833442
Acute; polyherbal; subchronic; toxicity; TLPL/AY/03/2008
15.  N-(2-{[5-Bromo-2-(piperidin-1-yl)pyrimidin-4-yl]sulfan­yl}-4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)benzene­sulfonamide 
The title compound, C22H23BrN4O3S2, crystallizes with two mol­ecules, A and B, in the asymmetric unit. In one of these, the meth­oxy group is disordered over two sets of sites in a 0.565 (9):0.435 (9) ratio. The benzene rings bridged by the sulfonamide group are tilted relative to each other by 37.4 (1) and 56.1 (1)° in mol­ecules A and B, respectively, while the dihedral angles between the sulfur-bridged pyrimidine and benzene rings are 72.4 (1) and 70.2 (1)° for A and B, respectively. The piperidine ring adopts a chair conformation in both mol­ecules. In the crystal, inversion dimers linked by pairs of N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds occur for both A and B; the dimers are linked into [010] chains by C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The crystal structure also features inversion-generated aromatic π–π stacking inter­actions between the pyrimidine rings for both mol­ecules [centroid–centroid distances = 3.412 (2) (mol­ecule A) and 3.396 (2) Å (mol­ecule B)].
doi:10.1107/S1600536812043668
PMCID: PMC3515297  PMID: 23284517
16.  1H-Indole-3-carbaldehyde 
In the title compound, C9H7NO, the benzene ring forms a dihedral angle of 3.98 (12)° with the pyrrole ring. In the crystal, N–H⋯O hydrogen bonds links the mol­ecules into chains which run parallel to [02-1].
doi:10.1107/S1600536812040573
PMCID: PMC3515237  PMID: 23284457
17.  N-[2-(5-Bromo-2-morpholin-4-ylpyrim­idin-4-ylsulfan­yl)-4-meth­oxy­phen­yl]-2,4,6-trimethyl­benzene­sulfonamide 
In the title compound, C24H27BrN4O4S2, the mol­ecule is twisted at the sulfonyl S atom with a C—S(O2)—N(H)—C torsion angle of 62.6 (3)°. The benzene rings bridged by the sulfonamide group are tilted to each other by a dihedral angle of 60.6 (1)°. The dihedral angle between the sulfur-bridged pyrimidine and benzene rings is 62.7 (1)°. The morpholine ring adopts a chair conformation. The mol­ecular conformation is stabilized by a weak intra­molecular π–π stacking inter­action between the pyrimidine and the 2,4,6-trimethyl­benzene rings [centroid–centroid distance = 3.793 (2) Å]. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a chain along the b axis.
doi:10.1107/S1600536812040792
PMCID: PMC3515169  PMID: 23284396
18.  (E)-N′-[1-(Thio­phen-2-yl)ethyl­idene]isonicotinohydrazide 
In the title compound, C12H11N3OS, the dihedral angle between the pyridine and thio­phene rings is 46.70 (9)° and the C—N—N—C torsion angle is 178.61 (15)°. In the crystal, inversion dimers linked by pairs of N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds generate R 2 2(8) loops.
doi:10.1107/S1600536812039426
PMCID: PMC3470339  PMID: 23125752
19.  N-(2-{[5-Bromo-2-(piperidin-1-yl)pyrimidin-4-yl]sulfan­yl}-4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)-4-methyl­benzene­sulfonamide 
In the title compound, C23H25BrN4O3S2, the benzene rings bridged by the sulfonamide group are tilted relative to each other by 69.7 (1)° and the dihedral angle between the sulfur-bridged pyrimidine and benzene rings is 70.4 (1)°. The mol­ecular conformation is stabilized by a weak intra­molecular π–π stacking inter­action between the pyrimidine and the 4-methyl benzene rings [centroid–centroid distance = 3.633 (2) Å]. The piperidine ring adopts a chair conformation. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked into inversion dimers by pairs of N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds.
doi:10.1107/S1600536812037257
PMCID: PMC3470193  PMID: 23125637
20.  N-(2-{[5-Bromo-2-(morpholin-4-yl)pyrimidin-4-yl]sulfan­yl}-4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)-4-chloro­benzene­sulfonamide 
In the title compound, C21H20BrClN4O4S2, the benzene rings bridged by the sulfonamide group are tilted relative to each other by a dihedral angle of 70.2 (1)° and the dihedral angle between the sulfur-bridged pyrimidine and benzene rings is 69.5 (1)°. The mol­ecular conformation is stabilized by a weak intra­molecular π–π stacking inter­action between the pyrimidine and the 4-chloro­benzene rings [centroid–centroid distance = 3.978 (2) Å]. The morpholine ring adopts a chair conformation. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked into inversion dimers by pairs of C—H⋯N hydrogen bonds and these dimers are further connected by N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a tape along the a axis.
doi:10.1107/S1600536812036689
PMCID: PMC3435827  PMID: 22969673
21.  N-(2-{[5-Bromo-2-(piperidin-1-yl)pyrimidin-4-yl]sulfan­yl}-4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)-2,4,6-trimethyl­benzene­sulfonamide 
In the title compound, C25H29BrN4O3S2, the benzene rings bridged by the sulfonamide group are tilted relative to each other by 63.9 (1)° and the dihedral angle between the sulfur-bridged pyrimidine and benzene rings is 64.9 (1)°. The mol­ecular conformation is stabilized by a weak intra­molecular π–π stacking inter­action between the pyrimidine and the 2,4,6-trimethyl­benzene rings [centroid–centroid distance = 3.766 (2) Å]. The piperidine ring adopts a chair conformation. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked into inversion dimers by pairs of N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds and these dimers are further linked by C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds into chains propagating along [010].
doi:10.1107/S1600536812036185
PMCID: PMC3435802  PMID: 22969648
22.  N-(2-{[5-Bromo-2-(morpholin-4-yl)pyrimidin-4-yl]sulfan­yl}-4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)-4-methyl­benzene­sulfonamide 
In the title compound, C22H23BrN4O4S2, the benzene rings bridged by the sulfonamide group are tilted relative to each other by 68.9 (1)° and the dihedral angle between the sulfur-bridged pyrimidine and benzene rings is 69.7 (1)°. The mol­ecular conformation is stabilized by a weak intra­molecular π–π stacking inter­action between the pyrimidine and the 4-methylbenzene rings [centroid–centroid distance = 3.934 (2) Å]. The morpholine ring adopts a chair conformation and is disordered over two positions with an occupancy ratio of 0.853 (6):0.147 (6). In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds into chains extending along the a axis and further, through C—H⋯N and C—H⋯O inter­actions, into a three-dimensional supramolecular structure.
doi:10.1107/S1600536812033375
PMCID: PMC3415028  PMID: 22905015
23.  Endodontic Management of Mandibular First Molar with Middle Distal Canal: A Case Report 
Case Reports in Dentistry  2012;2012:458079.
The knowledge of variations in root canal morphology is critical for a successful endodontic treatment. This article presents the endodontic management of a unique case of mandibular molar with middle distal canal which is quite uncommon.
doi:10.1155/2012/458079
PMCID: PMC3362822  PMID: 22666613
24.  1-(2-Hy­droxy-5-methyl­phen­yl)-3-(2-methyl­phen­yl)prop-2-en-1-one 
In the title compound, C17H16O2, the dihedral angle between the aromatic rings is 5.12 (13)° and an intra­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bond generates an S(6) ring.
doi:10.1107/S1600536811018381
PMCID: PMC3120591  PMID: 21754860
25.  7-Chloro-5-cyclo­propyl-9-methyl-5H-4,5,6,10-tetra­aza­dibenzo[a,d]cyclo­hepten-11(10H)-one 
In the title compound, C15H13ClN4O, which is a chloro derivative of the drug Nevirapine, the diazepine ring is in a twisted boat conformation. The pyridine rings fused to the diazepine fragment form a dihedral angle of 58.44 (10)° and the mol­ecule adopts a butterfly shape. The mol­ecules are joined via N—H⋯N hydrogen bonding into polymeric chains down the b axis. All weaker C—H⋯O inter­actions involve the carbonyl O atom as acceptor.
doi:10.1107/S1600536811018022
PMCID: PMC3120426  PMID: 21754822

Results 1-25 (45)