PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-7 (7)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Year of Publication
1.  Which, if any, hydrates will crystallise? Predicting hydrate formation of two dihydroxybenzoic acids† 
A study of two dihydroxybenzoic acid isomers shows that computational methods can be used to predict hydrate formation, the compound : water ratio and hydrate crystal structures. The calculations also help identify a novel hydrate found in the solid form screening that validates this study.
doi:10.1039/c1cc10762c
PMCID: PMC3175531  PMID: 21475750
2.  Solid-State Forms of β-Resorcylic Acid: How Exhaustive Should a Polymorph Screen Be? 
Crystal Growth & Design  2010;11(1):210-220.
A combined experimental and computational study was undertaken to establish the solid-state forms of β-resorcylic acid (2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid). The experimental search resulted in nine crystalline forms: two concomitantly crystallizing polymorphs, five novel solvates (with acetic acid, dimethyl sulfoxide, 1,4-dioxane, and two with N,N-dimethyl formamide), in addition to the known hemihydrate and a new monohydrate. Form II°, the thermodynamically stable polymorph at room temperature, was found to be the dominant crystallization product. A new, enantiotropically related polymorph (form I) was obtained by desolvation of certain solvates, sublimation experiments, and via a thermally induced solid−solid transformation of form II° above 150 °C. To establish their structural features, interconversions, and relative stability, all solid-state forms were characterized with thermal, spectroscopic, X-ray crystallographic methods, and moisture-sorption analysis. The hemihydrate is very stable, while the five solvates and the monohydrate are rather unstable phases that occur as crystallization intermediates. Complementary computational work confirmed that the two experimentally observed β-resorcylic acid forms I and II° are the most probable polymorphs and supported the experimental evidence for form I being disordered in the p-OH proton position. These consistent outcomes suggest that the most practically important features of β-resorcylic acid crystallization under ambient conditions have been established; however, it appears impractical to guarantee that no additional metastable solid-state form could be found.
An extensive experimental screen, coupled with a computational study, revealed seven new solid-state forms of β-resorcylic acid. The known, stable polymorph II° shows a reversible phase transformation to the new, kinetically stable, probably disordered high temperature form I. The study provides a consistent picture of the solid-state of β-resorcylic acid.
doi:10.1021/cg101162a
PMCID: PMC3015459  PMID: 21218174
3.  The Complexity of Hydration of Phloroglucinol: A Comprehensive Structural and Thermodynamic Characterization 
The Journal of Physical Chemistry. B  2012;116(13):3961-3972.
Hydrate formation is of great importance as the inclusion of water molecules affects many solid state properties and hence determines the required chemical processing, handling, and storage. Phloroglucinol is industrially important, and the observed differences in the morphology and diffuse scattering effects with growth conditions have been scientifically controversial. We have studied the anhydrate and dihydrate of phloroglucinol and their transformations by a unique combination of complementary experimental and computational techniques, namely, moisture sorption analysis, hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry, isothermal calorimetry, single crystal and powder X-ray diffractometry, and crystal energy landscape calculations. The enthalpically stable dihydrate phase is unstable below 16% relative humidity (25 °C) and above 50 °C (ambient humidity), and the kinetics of hydration/dehydration are relatively rapid with a small hysteresis. A consistent atomistic picture of the thermodynamics of the hydrate/anhydrate transition was derived, consistent with the disordered single X-ray crystal structure and crystal energy landscape showing closely related low energy hydrate structures. These structures provide models for proton disorder and show stacking faults as intergrowth of different layers are possible. This indicates that the consequent variability in crystal surface features and diffuse scattering with growth conditions is not a practical concern.
doi:10.1021/jp211948q
PMCID: PMC3320094  PMID: 22390190
4.  Complex Polymorphic System of Gallic Acid—Five Monohydrates, Three Anhydrates, and over 20 Solvates 
Crystal Growth & Design  2012;13(1):19-23.
We report the structure of the fifth monohydrate of gallic acid and two additional anhydrate polymorphs and evidence of at least 22 other solvates formed, many containing water and another solvent. This unprecedented number of monohydrate polymorphs and diversity of solid forms is consistent with the anhydrate and monohydrate crystal energy landscapes, showing both a wide range of packing motifs and also some structures differing only in proton positions. By aiding the solution of structures from powder X-ray diffraction data and guiding the screening, the computational studies help explain the complex polymorphism of gallic acid. This is industrially relevant, as the three anhydrates are stable at ambient conditions but hydration/dehydration behavior is very dependent on relative humidity and phase purity.
An extensive experimental screen for solid forms, driven by computationally generated anhydrate and monohydrate crystal energy landscapes, revealed the fifth (!) monohydrate structure of gallic acid, structures of two additional anhydrate polymorphs, and evidence of at least 22 solvates. The application of computational studies in combination with other analytical techniques helps unravel the complex polymorphic system of gallic acid.
doi:10.1021/cg301506x
PMCID: PMC3557919  PMID: 23378823
5.  Absorbing a Little Water: The Structural, Thermodynamic, and Kinetic Relationship between Pyrogallol and Its Tetarto-Hydrate 
Crystal Growth & Design  2013;13(9):4071-4083.
The anhydrate and the stoichiometric tetarto-hydrate of pyrogallol (0.25 mol water per mol pyrogallol) are both storage stable at ambient conditions, provided that they are phase pure, with the system being at equilibrium at aw (water activity) = 0.15 at 25 °C. Structures have been derived from single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction data for the anhydrate and hydrate, respectively. It is notable that the tetarto-hydrate forms a tetragonal structure with water in channels, a framework that although stabilized by water, is found as a higher energy structure on a computationally generated crystal energy landscape, which has the anhydrate crystal structure as the most stable form. Thus, a combination of slurry experiments, X-ray diffraction, spectroscopy, moisture (de)sorption, and thermo-analytical methods with the computationally generated crystal energy landscape and lattice energy calculations provides a consistent picture of the finely balanced hydration behavior of pyrogallol. In addition, two monotropically related dimethyl sulfoxide monosolvates were found in the accompanying solid form screen.
The structural transformation between anhydrous and hydrated pyrogallol, the only two practically relevant forms emerging from a solid form screen, has been unraveled with complementary experimental techniques (moisture sorption analysis, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, and water activity measurements) and crystal energy landscape calculations.
doi:10.1021/cg4009015
PMCID: PMC3767201  PMID: 24027438
6.  Towards crystal structure prediction of complex organic compounds – a report on the fifth blind test 
Following on from the success of the previous crystal structure prediction blind tests (CSP1999, CSP2001, CSP2004 and CSP2007), a fifth such collaborative project (CSP2010) was organized at the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre. A range of methodologies was used by the participating groups in order to evaluate the ability of the current computational methods to predict the crystal structures of the six organic molecules chosen as targets for this blind test. The first four targets, two rigid molecules, one semi-flexible molecule and a 1:1 salt, matched the criteria for the targets from CSP2007, while the last two targets belonged to two new challenging categories – a larger, much more flexible molecule and a hydrate with more than one polymorph. Each group submitted three predictions for each target it attempted. There was at least one successful prediction for each target, and two groups were able to successfully predict the structure of the large flexible molecule as their first place submission. The results show that while not as many groups successfully predicted the structures of the three smallest molecules as in CSP2007, there is now evidence that methodologies such as dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) are able to reliably do so. The results also highlight the many challenges posed by more complex systems and show that there are still issues to be overcome.
doi:10.1107/S0108768111042868
PMCID: PMC3222142  PMID: 22101543
7.  Towards crystal structure prediction of complex organic compounds – a report on the fifth blind test 
The results of the fifth blind test of crystal structure prediction, which show important success with more challenging large and flexible molecules, are presented and discussed.
Following on from the success of the previous crystal structure prediction blind tests (CSP1999, CSP2001, CSP2004 and CSP2007), a fifth such collaborative project (CSP2010) was organized at the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre. A range of methodologies was used by the participating groups in order to evaluate the ability of the current computational methods to predict the crystal structures of the six organic molecules chosen as targets for this blind test. The first four targets, two rigid molecules, one semi-flexible molecule and a 1:1 salt, matched the criteria for the targets from CSP2007, while the last two targets belonged to two new challenging categories – a larger, much more flexible molecule and a hydrate with more than one polymorph. Each group submitted three predictions for each target it attempted. There was at least one successful prediction for each target, and two groups were able to successfully predict the structure of the large flexible molecule as their first place submission. The results show that while not as many groups successfully predicted the structures of the three smallest molecules as in CSP2007, there is now evidence that methodologies such as dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) are able to reliably do so. The results also highlight the many challenges posed by more complex systems and show that there are still issues to be overcome.
doi:10.1107/S0108768111042868
PMCID: PMC3222142  PMID: 22101543
prediction; blind test; polymorph; crystal structure prediction

Results 1-7 (7)