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1.  Expression, purification and crystallization of CTB-MPR, a candidate mucosal vaccine component against HIV-1 
IUCrJ  2014;1(Pt 5):305-317.
Femtosecond X-ray crystallography allows structural analysis of a difficult-to-crystallize fusion protein that is a potential component of a candidate HIV-1 subunit vaccine.
CTB-MPR is a fusion protein between the B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB) and the membrane-proximal region of gp41 (MPR), the transmembrane envelope protein of Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1), and has previously been shown to induce the production of anti-HIV-1 antibodies with antiviral functions. To further improve the design of this candidate vaccine, X-ray crystallography experiments were performed to obtain structural information about this fusion protein. Several variants of CTB-MPR were designed, constructed and recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. The first variant contained a flexible GPGP linker between CTB and MPR, and yielded crystals that diffracted to a resolution of 2.3 Å, but only the CTB region was detected in the electron-density map. A second variant, in which the CTB was directly attached to MPR, was shown to destabilize pentamer formation. A third construct containing a polyalanine linker between CTB and MPR proved to stabilize the pentameric form of the protein during purification. The purification procedure was shown to produce a homogeneously pure and monodisperse sample for crystallization. Initial crystallization experiments led to pseudo-crystals which were ordered in only two dimensions and were disordered in the third dimension. Nanocrystals obtained using the same precipitant showed promising X-ray diffraction to 5 Å resolution in femtosecond nanocrystallography experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The results demonstrate the utility of femtosecond X-ray crystallography to enable structural analysis based on nano/microcrystals of a protein for which no macroscopic crystals ordered in three dimensions have been observed before.
doi:10.1107/S2052252514014900
PMCID: PMC4174873  PMID: 25295172
X-ray crystallography; femtosecond nanocrystallography; HIV-1; gp41; membrane-proximal region; cholera toxin B subunit; crystallization; free-electron lasers
2.  Fixed-target protein serial microcrystallography with an x-ray free electron laser 
Scientific Reports  2014;4:6026.
We present results from experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) demonstrating that serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) can be performed to high resolution (~2.5 Å) using protein microcrystals deposited on an ultra-thin silicon nitride membrane and embedded in a preservation medium at room temperature. Data can be acquired at a high acquisition rate using x-ray free electron laser sources to overcome radiation damage, while sample consumption is dramatically reduced compared to flowing jet methods. We achieved a peak data acquisition rate of 10 Hz with a hit rate of ~38%, indicating that a complete data set could be acquired in about one 12-hour LCLS shift using the setup described here, or in even less time using hardware optimized for fixed target SFX. This demonstration opens the door to ultra low sample consumption SFX using the technique of diffraction-before-destruction on proteins that exist in only small quantities and/or do not produce the copious quantities of microcrystals required for flowing jet methods.
doi:10.1038/srep06026
PMCID: PMC4129423  PMID: 25113598
3.  Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser 
Seibert, M. Marvin | Ekeberg, Tomas | Maia, Filipe R. N. C. | Svenda, Martin | Andreasson, Jakob | Jönsson, Olof | Odić, Duško | Iwan, Bianca | Rocker, Andrea | Westphal, Daniel | Hantke, Max | DePonte, Daniel P. | Barty, Anton | Schulz, Joachim | Gumprecht, Lars | Coppola, Nicola | Aquila, Andrew | Liang, Mengning | White, Thomas A. | Martin, Andrew | Caleman, Carl | Stern, Stephan | Abergel, Chantal | Seltzer, Virginie | Claverie, Jean-Michel | Bostedt, Christoph | Bozek, John D. | Boutet, Sébastien | Miahnahri, A. Alan | Messerschmidt, Marc | Krzywinski, Jacek | Williams, Garth | Hodgson, Keith O. | Bogan, Michael J. | Hampton, Christina Y. | Sierra, Raymond G. | Starodub, Dmitri | Andersson, Inger | Bajt, Saša | Barthelmess, Miriam | Spence, John C. H. | Fromme, Petra | Weierstall, Uwe | Kirian, Richard | Hunter, Mark | Doak, R. Bruce | Marchesini, Stefano | Hau-Riege, Stefan P. | Frank, Matthias | Shoeman, Robert L. | Lomb, Lukas | Epp, Sascha W. | Hartmann, Robert | Rolles, Daniel | Rudenko, Artem | Schmidt, Carlo | Foucar, Lutz | Kimmel, Nils | Holl, Peter | Rudek, Benedikt | Erk, Benjamin | Hömke, André | Reich, Christian | Pietschner, Daniel | Weidenspointner, Georg | Strüder, Lothar | Hauser, Günter | Gorke, Hubert | Ullrich, Joachim | Schlichting, Ilme | Herrmann, Sven | Schaller, Gerhard | Schopper, Florian | Soltau, Heike | Kühnel, Kai-Uwe | Andritschke, Robert | Schröter, Claus-Dieter | Krasniqi, Faton | Bott, Mario | Schorb, Sebastian | Rupp, Daniela | Adolph, Marcus | Gorkhover, Tais | Hirsemann, Helmut | Potdevin, Guillaume | Graafsma, Heinz | Nilsson, Björn | Chapman, Henry N. | Hajdu, Janos
Nature  2011;470(7332):78-81.
X-ray lasers offer new capabilities in understanding the structure of biological systems, complex materials and matter under extreme conditions1–4. Very short and extremely bright, coherent X-ray pulses can be used to outrun key damage processes and obtain a single diffraction pattern from a large macromolecule, a virus or a cell before the sample explodes and turns into plasma1. The continuous diffraction pattern of non-crystalline objects permits oversampling and direct phase retrieval2. Here we show that high-quality diffraction data can be obtained with a single X-ray pulse from a non-crystalline biological sample, a single mimivirus particle, which was injected into the pulsed beam of a hard-X-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source5. Calculations indicate that the energy deposited into the virus by the pulse heated the particle to over 100,000 K after the pulse had left the sample. The reconstructed exit wavefront (image) yielded 32-nm full-period resolution in a single exposure and showed no measurable damage. The reconstruction indicates inhomogeneous arrangement of dense material inside the virion. We expect that significantly higher resolutions will be achieved in such experiments with shorter and brighter photon pulses focused to a smaller area. The resolution in such experiments can be further extended for samples available in multiple identical copies.
doi:10.1038/nature09748
PMCID: PMC4038304  PMID: 21293374
4.  Femtosecond protein nanocrystallography—data analysis methods 
Optics express  2010;18(6):5713-5723.
X-ray diffraction patterns may be obtained from individual submicron protein nanocrystals using a femtosecond pulse from a free-electron X-ray laser. Many “single-shot” patterns are read out every second from a stream of nanocrystals lying in random orientations. The short pulse terminates before significant atomic (or electronic) motion commences, minimizing radiation damage. Simulated patterns for Photosystem I nanocrystals are used to develop a method for recovering structure factors from tens of thousands of snapshot patterns from nanocrystals varying in size, shape and orientation. We determine the number of shots needed for a required accuracy in structure factor measurement and resolution, and investigate the convergence of our Monte-Carlo integration method.
PMCID: PMC4038330  PMID: 20389587
5.  Femtosecond X-ray diffraction from two-dimensional protein crystals 
Iucrj  2014;1(Pt 2):95-100.
Bragg diffraction achieved from two-dimensional protein crystals using femtosecond X-ray laser snapshots is presented.
X-ray diffraction patterns from two-dimensional (2-D) protein crystals obtained using femtosecond X-ray pulses from an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) are presented. To date, it has not been possible to acquire transmission X-ray diffraction patterns from individual 2-D protein crystals due to radiation damage. However, the intense and ultrafast pulses generated by an XFEL permit a new method of collecting diffraction data before the sample is destroyed. Utilizing a diffract-before-destroy approach at the Linac Coherent Light Source, Bragg diffraction was acquired to better than 8.5 Å resolution for two different 2-D protein crystal samples each less than 10 nm thick and maintained at room temperature. These proof-of-principle results show promise for structural analysis of both soluble and membrane proteins arranged as 2-D crystals without requiring cryogenic conditions or the formation of three-dimensional crystals.
doi:10.1107/S2052252514001444
PMCID: PMC4062087  PMID: 25075325
two-dimensional protein crystal; femtosecond crystallography; single layer X-ray diffraction; membrane protein
6.  High-Resolution Protein Structure Determination by Serial Femtosecond Crystallography 
Science (New York, N.Y.)  2012;337(6092):362-364.
Structure determination of proteins and other macromolecules has historically required the growth of high-quality crystals sufficiently large to diffract x-rays efficiently while withstanding radiation damage. We applied serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) to obtain high-resolution structural information from microcrystals (less than 1 micrometer by 1 micrometer by 3 micrometers) of the well-characterized model protein lysozyme. The agreement with synchrotron data demonstrates the immediate relevance of SFX for analyzing the structure of the large group of difficult-to-crystallize molecules.
doi:10.1126/science.1217737
PMCID: PMC3788707  PMID: 22653729
7.  Natively Inhibited Trypanosoma brucei Cathepsin B Structure Determined by Using an X-ray Laser 
Science (New York, N.Y.)  2012;339(6116):227-230.
The Trypanosoma brucei cysteine protease cathepsin B (TbCatB), which is involved in host protein degradation, is a promising target to develop new treatments against sleeping sickness, a fatal disease caused by this protozoan parasite. The structure of the mature, active form of TbCatB has so far not provided sufficient information for the design of a safe and specific drug against T. brucei. By combining two recent innovations, in vivo crystallization and serial femtosecond crystallography, we obtained the room-temperature 2.1 angstrom resolution structure of the fully glycosylated precursor complex of TbCatB. The structure reveals the mechanism of native TbCatB inhibition and demonstrates that new biomolecular information can be obtained by the “diffraction-before-destruction” approach of x-ray free-electron lasers from hundreds of thousands of individual microcrystals.
doi:10.1126/science.1229663
PMCID: PMC3786669  PMID: 23196907
8.  Radiation damage in protein serial femtosecond crystallography using an x-ray free-electron laser 
X-ray free-electron lasers deliver intense femtosecond pulses that promise to yield high resolution diffraction data of nanocrystals before the destruction of the sample by radiation damage. Diffraction intensities of lysozyme nanocrystals collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source using 2 keV photons were used for structure determination by molecular replacement and analyzed for radiation damage as a function of pulse length and fluence. Signatures of radiation damage are observed for pulses as short as 70 fs. Parametric scaling used in conventional crystallography does not account for the observed effects.
doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.84.214111
PMCID: PMC3786679  PMID: 24089594
9.  Self-terminating diffraction gates femtosecond X-ray nanocrystallography measurements 
Nature photonics  2011;6:35-40.
X-ray free-electron lasers have enabled new approaches to the structural determination of protein crystals that are too small or radiation-sensitive for conventional analysis1. For sufficiently short pulses, diffraction is collected before significant changes occur to the sample, and it has been predicted that pulses as short as 10 fs may be required to acquire atomic-resolution structural information1–4. Here, we describe a mechanism unique to ultrafast, ultra-intense X-ray experiments that allows structural information to be collected from crystalline samples using high radiation doses without the requirement for the pulse to terminate before the onset of sample damage. Instead, the diffracted X-rays are gated by a rapid loss of crystalline periodicity, producing apparent pulse lengths significantly shorter than the duration of the incident pulse. The shortest apparent pulse lengths occur at the highest resolution, and our measurements indicate that current X-ray free-electron laser technology5 should enable structural determination from submicrometre protein crystals with atomic resolution.
doi:10.1038/nphoton.2011.297
PMCID: PMC3783007  PMID: 24078834
10.  Time-resolved protein nanocrystallography using an X-ray free-electron laser 
Aquila, Andrew | Hunter, Mark S. | Doak, R. Bruce | Kirian, Richard A. | Fromme, Petra | White, Thomas A. | Andreasson, Jakob | Arnlund, David | Bajt, Saša | Barends, Thomas R. M. | Barthelmess, Miriam | Bogan, Michael J. | Bostedt, Christoph | Bottin, Hervé | Bozek, John D. | Caleman, Carl | Coppola, Nicola | Davidsson, Jan | DePonte, Daniel P. | Elser, Veit | Epp, Sascha W. | Erk, Benjamin | Fleckenstein, Holger | Foucar, Lutz | Frank, Matthias | Fromme, Raimund | Graafsma, Heinz | Grotjohann, Ingo | Gumprecht, Lars | Hajdu, Janos | Hampton, Christina Y. | Hartmann, Andreas | Hartmann, Robert | Hau-Riege, Stefan | Hauser, Günter | Hirsemann, Helmut | Holl, Peter | Holton, James M. | Hömke, André | Johansson, Linda | Kimmel, Nils | Kassemeyer, Stephan | Krasniqi, Faton | Kühnel, Kai-Uwe | Liang, Mengning | Lomb, Lukas | Malmerberg, Erik | Marchesini, Stefano | Martin, Andrew V. | Maia, Filipe R.N.C. | Messerschmidt, Marc | Nass, Karol | Reich, Christian | Neutze, Richard | Rolles, Daniel | Rudek, Benedikt | Rudenko, Artem | Schlichting, Ilme | Schmidt, Carlo | Schmidt, Kevin E. | Schulz, Joachim | Seibert, M. Marvin | Shoeman, Robert L. | Sierra, Raymond | Soltau, Heike | Starodub, Dmitri | Stellato, Francesco | Stern, Stephan | Strüder, Lothar | Timneanu, Nicusor | Ullrich, Joachim | Wang, Xiaoyu | Williams, Garth J. | Weidenspointner, Georg | Weierstall, Uwe | Wunderer, Cornelia | Barty, Anton | Spence, John C. H. | Chapman, Henry N.
Optics Express  2012;20(3):2706-2716.
We demonstrate the use of an X-ray free electron laser synchronized with an optical pump laser to obtain X-ray diffraction snapshots from the photoactivated states of large membrane protein complexes in the form of nanocrystals flowing in a liquid jet. Light-induced changes of Photosystem I-Ferredoxin co-crystals were observed at time delays of 5 to 10 µs after excitation. The result correlates with the microsecond kinetics of electron transfer from Photosystem I to ferredoxin. The undocking process that follows the electron transfer leads to large rearrangements in the crystals that will terminally lead to the disintegration of the crystals. We describe the experimental setup and obtain the first time-resolved femtosecond serial X-ray crystallography results from an irreversible photo-chemical reaction at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This technique opens the door to time-resolved structural studies of reaction dynamics in biological systems.
doi:10.1364/OE.20.002706
PMCID: PMC3413412  PMID: 22330507
(170.7160) Ultrafast technology; (170.7440) X-ray imaging; (140.3450) Laser-induced chemistry; (140.7090) Ultrafast lasers; (170.0170) Medical optics and biotechnology
11.  Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi alter above- and below-ground chemical defense expression differentially among Asclepias species 
Below-ground (BG) symbionts of plants can have substantial influence on plant growth and nutrition. Recent work demonstrates that mycorrhizal fungi can affect plant resistance to herbivory and the performance of above- (AG) and BG herbivores. Although these examples emerge from diverse systems, it is unclear if plant species that express similar defensive traits respond similarly to fungal colonization, but comparative work may inform this question. To examine the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on the expression of chemical resistance, we inoculated 8 species of Asclepias (milkweed)—which all produce toxic cardenolides—with a community of AMF. We quantified plant biomass, foliar and root cardenolide concentration and composition, and assessed evidence for a growth-defense tradeoff in the presence and absence of AMF. As expected, total foliar and root cardenolide concentration varied among milkweed species. Importantly, the effect of mycorrhizal fungi on total foliar cardenolide concentration also varied among milkweed species, with foliar cardenolides increasing or decreasing, depending on the plant species. We detected a phylogenetic signal to this variation; AMF fungi reduced foliar cardenolide concentrations to a greater extent in the clade including A. curassavica than in the clade including A. syriaca. Moreover, AMF inoculation shifted the composition of cardenolides in AG and BG plant tissues in a species-specific fashion. Mycorrhizal inoculation changed the relative distribution of cardenolides between root and shoot tissue in a species-specific fashion, but did not affect cardenolide diversity or polarity. Finally, a tradeoff between plant growth and defense in non-mycorrhizal plants was mitigated completely by AMF inoculation. Overall, we conclude that the effects of AMF inoculation on the expression of chemical resistance can vary among congeneric plant species, and ameliorate tradeoffs between growth and defense.
doi:10.3389/fpls.2013.00361
PMCID: PMC3776932  PMID: 24065971
plant–herbivore interactions; mycorrhizal fungi; plant defense; above-below-ground interactions; growth-defense tradeoff; root defense; phylogenetic signal
12.  Toward structure determination using membrane-protein nanocrystals and microcrystals 
Methods (San Diego, Calif.)  2011;55(4):387-404.
Membrane proteins are very important for all living cells, being involved in respiration, photosynthesis, cellular uptake and signal transduction, amongst other vital functions. However, less than 300 unique membrane protein structures have been determined to date, often due to difficulties associated with the growth of sufficiently large and well-ordered crystals. This work has been focused on showing the first proof of concept for using membrane protein nanocrystals and microcrystals for high-resolution structure determination. Upon determining that crystals of the membrane protein Photosystem I, which is the largest and most complex membrane protein crystallized to date, exist with only a hundred unit cells with sizes of less than 200 nm on an edge, work was done to develop a technique that could exploit the growth of the Photosystem I nanocrystals and microcrystals. Femtosecond X-ray protein nanocrystallography was developed for use at the first high-energy X-ray free electron laser, the LCLS at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, in which a liquid jet brought fully-hydrated Photosystem I nanocrystals into the interaction region of the pulsed X-ray source. Diffraction patterns were recorded from millions of individual PSI nanocrystals and data from thousands of different, randomly oriented crystallites were integrated using Monte Carlo integration of the peak intensities. The short pulses (~ 70 fs) provided by the LCLS allowed the possibility to collect the diffraction data before the onset of radiation damage, exploiting the diffract-before-destroy principle. During the initial experiments at the AMO beamline using 6.9-Å wavelength, Bragg peaks were recorded to 8.5-Å resolution, and an electron-density map was determined that did not show any effects of X-ray-induced radiation damage [Chapman H.N., et al. Femtosecond X-ray protein nanocrystallography, Nature 470 (2011) 73–81]. Many additional techniques still need to be developed to explore the femtosecond nanocrystallography technique for experimental phasing and time-resolved X-ray crystallography experiments. The first proof-of-principle results for the femtosecond nanocrystallography technique indicate the incredible potential of the technique to offer a new route to the structure determination of membrane proteins.
doi:10.1016/j.ymeth.2011.12.006
PMCID: PMC3414265  PMID: 22197730
membrane proteins; structure determination; femtosecond nanocrystallography; protein nanocrystals; X-ray crystallography; XFEL
13.  Lipidic phase membrane protein serial femtosecond crystallography 
Nature methods  2012;9(3):263-265.
X-ray free electron laser (X-feL)-based serial femtosecond crystallography is an emerging method with potential to rapidly advance the challenging field of membrane protein structural biology. here we recorded interpretable diffraction data from micrometer-sized lipidic sponge phase crystals of the Blastochloris viridis photosynthetic reaction center delivered into an X-feL beam using a sponge phase micro-jet.
doi:10.1038/nmeth.1867
PMCID: PMC3438231  PMID: 22286383
14.  Femtosecond X-ray protein nanocrystallography 
Chapman, Henry N. | Fromme, Petra | Barty, Anton | White, Thomas A. | Kirian, Richard A. | Aquila, Andrew | Hunter, Mark S. | Schulz, Joachim | DePonte, Daniel P. | Weierstall, Uwe | Doak, R. Bruce | Maia, Filipe R. N. C. | Martin, Andrew V. | Schlichting, Ilme | Lomb, Lukas | Coppola, Nicola | Shoeman, Robert L. | Epp, Sascha W. | Hartmann, Robert | Rolles, Daniel | Rudenko, Artem | Foucar, Lutz | Kimmel, Nils | Weidenspointner, Georg | Holl, Peter | Liang, Mengning | Barthelmess, Miriam | Caleman, Carl | Boutet, Sébastien | Bogan, Michael J. | Krzywinski, Jacek | Bostedt, Christoph | Bajt, Saša | Gumprecht, Lars | Rudek, Benedikt | Erk, Benjamin | Schmidt, Carlo | Hömke, André | Reich, Christian | Pietschner, Daniel | Strüder, Lothar | Hauser, Günter | Gorke, Hubert | Ullrich, Joachim | Herrmann, Sven | Schaller, Gerhard | Schopper, Florian | Soltau, Heike | Kühnel, Kai-Uwe | Messerschmidt, Marc | Bozek, John D. | Hau-Riege, Stefan P. | Frank, Matthias | Hampton, Christina Y. | Sierra, Raymond G. | Starodub, Dmitri | Williams, Garth J. | Hajdu, Janos | Timneanu, Nicusor | Seibert, M. Marvin | Andreasson, Jakob | Rocker, Andrea | Jönsson, Olof | Svenda, Martin | Stern, Stephan | Nass, Karol | Andritschke, Robert | Schröter, Claus-Dieter | Krasniqi, Faton | Bott, Mario | Schmidt, Kevin E. | Wang, Xiaoyu | Grotjohann, Ingo | Holton, James M. | Barends, Thomas R. M. | Neutze, Richard | Marchesini, Stefano | Fromme, Raimund | Schorb, Sebastian | Rupp, Daniela | Adolph, Marcus | Gorkhover, Tais | Andersson, Inger | Hirsemann, Helmut | Potdevin, Guillaume | Graafsma, Heinz | Nilsson, Björn | Spence, John C. H.
Nature  2011;470(7332):73-77.
X-ray crystallography provides the vast majority of macromolecular structures, but the success of the method relies on growing crystals of sufficient size. In conventional measurements, the necessary increase in X-ray dose to record data from crystals that are too small leads to extensive damage before a diffraction signal can be recorded1-3. It is particularly challenging to obtain large, well-diffracting crystals of membrane proteins, for which fewer than 300 unique structures have been determined despite their importance in all living cells. Here we present a method for structure determination where single-crystal X-ray diffraction ‘snapshots’ are collected from a fully hydrated stream of nanocrystals using femtosecond pulses from a hard-X-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source4. We prove this concept with nanocrystals of photosystem I, one of the largest membrane protein complexes5. More than 3,000,000 diffraction patterns were collected in this study, and a three-dimensional data set was assembled from individual photosystem I nanocrystals (~200 nm to 2 μm in size). We mitigate the problem of radiation damage in crystallography by using pulses briefer than the timescale of most damage processes6. This offers a new approach to structure determination of macromolecules that do not yield crystals of sufficient size for studies using conventional radiation sources or are particularly sensitive to radiation damage.
doi:10.1038/nature09750
PMCID: PMC3429598  PMID: 21293373
15.  In vivo protein crystallization opens new routes in structural biology 
Nature methods  2012;9(3):259-262.
Protein crystallization in cells has been observed several times in nature. However, owing to their small size these crystals have not yet been used for X-ray crystallographic analysis. We prepared nano-sized in vivo–grown crystals of Trypanosoma brucei enzymes and applied the emerging method of free-electron laser-based serial femtosecond crystallography to record interpretable diffraction data. This combined approach will open new opportunities in structural systems biology.
doi:10.1038/nmeth.1859
PMCID: PMC3429599  PMID: 22286384
16.  Time-resolved protein nanocrystallography using an X-ray free-electron laser 
Aquila, Andrew | Hunter, Mark S | Bruce Doak, R. | Kirian, Richard A. | Fromme, Petra | White, Thomas A. | Andreasson, Jakob | Arnlund, David | Bajt, Saša | Barends, Thomas R. M. | Barthelmess, Miriam | Bogan, Michael J. | Bostedt, Christoph | Bottin, Hervé | Bozek, John D. | Caleman, Carl | Coppola, Nicola | Davidsson, Jan | DePonte, Daniel P. | Elser, Veit | Epp, Sascha W. | Erk, Benjamin | Fleckenstein, Holger | Foucar, Lutz | Frank, Matthias | Fromme, Raimund | Graafsma, Heinz | Grotjohann, Ingo | Gumprecht, Lars | Hajdu, Janos | Hampton, Christina Y. | Hartmann, Andreas | Hartmann, Robert | Hau-Riege, Stefan | Hauser, Günter | Hirsemann, Helmut | Holl, Peter | Holton, James M. | Hömke, André | Johansson, Linda | Kimmel, Nils | Kassemeyer, Stephan | Krasniqi, Faton | Kühnel, Kai-Uwe | Liang, Mengning | Lomb, Lukas | Malmerberg, Erik | Marchesini, Stefano | Martin, Andrew V. | Maia, Filipe R.N.C. | Messerschmidt, Marc | Nass, Karol | Reich, Christian | Neutze, Richard | Rolles, Daniel | Rudek, Benedikt | Rudenko, Artem | Schlichting, Ilme | Schmidt, Carlo | Schmidt, Kevin E. | Schulz, Joachim | Seibert, M. Marvin | Shoeman, Robert L. | Sierra, Raymond | Soltau, Heike | Starodub, Dmitri | Stellato, Francesco | Stern, Stephan | Strüder, Lothar | Timneanu, Nicusor | Ullrich, Joachim | Wang, Xiaoyu | Williams, Garth J. | Weidenspointner, Georg | Weierstall, Uwe | Wunderer, Cornelia | Barty, Anton | Spence, John C. H | Chapman, Henry N.
Optics express  2012;20(3):2706-2716.
We demonstrate the use of an X-ray free electron laser synchronized with an optical pump laser to obtain X-ray diffraction snapshots from the photoactivated states of large membrane protein complexes in the form of nanocrystals flowing in a liquid jet. Light-induced changes of Photosystem I-Ferredoxin co-crystals were observed at time delays of 5 to 10 μs after excitation. The result correlates with the microsecond kinetics of electron transfer from Photosystem I to ferredoxin. The undocking process that follows the electron transfer leads to large rearrangements in the crystals that will terminally lead to the disintegration of the crystals. We describe the experimental setup and obtain the first time-resolved femtosecond serial X-ray crystallography results from an irreversible photo-chemical reaction at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This technique opens the door to time-resolved structural studies of reaction dynamics in biological systems.
PMCID: PMC3413412  PMID: 22330507
17.  Structure-factor analysis of femtosecond microdiffraction patterns from protein nanocrystals 
A complete set of structure factors has been extracted from hundreds of thousands of femtosecond X-ray diffraction patterns from randomly oriented Photosystem I membrane protein nanocrystals, using the Monte Carlo method of intensity integration. The data, collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source, are compared with conventional single-crystal data collected at a synchrotron source, and the quality of each data set was found to be similar.
A complete set of structure factors has been extracted from hundreds of thousands of femtosecond single-shot X-ray microdiffraction patterns taken from randomly oriented nanocrystals. The method of Monte Carlo integration over crystallite size and orientation was applied to experimental data from Photosystem I nanocrystals. This arrives at structure factors from many partial reflections without prior knowledge of the particle-size distribution. The data were collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source (the first hard-X-ray laser user facility), to which was fitted a hydrated protein nanocrystal injector jet, according to the method of serial crystallography. The data are single ‘still’ diffraction snapshots, each from a different nanocrystal with sizes ranging between 100 nm and 2 µm, so the angular width of Bragg peaks was dominated by crystal-size effects. These results were compared with single-crystal data recorded from large crystals of Photosystem I at the Advanced Light Source and the quality of the data was found to be similar. The implications for improving the efficiency of data collection by allowing the use of very small crystals, for radiation-damage reduction and for time-resolved diffraction studies at room temperature are discussed.
doi:10.1107/S0108767310050981
PMCID: PMC3066792  PMID: 21325716
nanocrystals; femtosecond diffraction; free-electron lasers; Monte Carlo methods; protein microdiffraction
18.  The N–Terminal Tail of hERG Contains an Amphipathic α–Helix That Regulates Channel Deactivation 
PLoS ONE  2011;6(1):e16191.
The cytoplasmic N–terminal domain of the human ether–a–go–go related gene (hERG) K+ channel is critical for the slow deactivation kinetics of the channel. However, the mechanism(s) by which the N–terminal domain regulates deactivation remains to be determined. Here we show that the solution NMR structure of the N–terminal 135 residues of hERG contains a previously described Per–Arnt–Sim (PAS) domain (residues 26–135) as well as an amphipathic α–helix (residues 13–23) and an initial unstructured segment (residues 2–9). Deletion of residues 2–25, only the unstructured segment (residues 2–9) or replacement of the α–helix with a flexible linker all result in enhanced rates of deactivation. Thus, both the initial flexible segment and the α–helix are required but neither is sufficient to confer slow deactivation kinetics. Alanine scanning mutagenesis identified R5 and G6 in the initial flexible segment as critical for slow deactivation. Alanine mutants in the helical region had less dramatic phenotypes. We propose that the PAS domain is bound close to the central core of the channel and that the N–terminal α–helix ensures that the flexible tail is correctly orientated for interaction with the activation gating machinery to stabilize the open state of the channel.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0016191
PMCID: PMC3020963  PMID: 21249148
19.  Inquiry into handling of CJD alert welcomed 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2002;325(7372):1055.
PMCID: PMC1124571  PMID: 12424157
21.  Torture continues in post-election Zimbabwe 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2002;324(7345):1057.
PMCID: PMC1123024  PMID: 11991905

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