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author:("roga, Mehran")
1.  Association of helicobacter pylori infection with severity of coronary heart disease 
ARYA Atherosclerosis  2012;7(4):138-141.
BACKGROUND:
There are few literatures evaluating the association between cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) positive strains of Helicobacter pylori (HP) and the severity of coronary heart disease (CHD). This study was designed to investigate this association.
METHODS:
Medical and drug history of 112 consecutive patients who were candidate for coronary angiography were taken. Fasting blood samples were obtained to measure C-reactive protein (CRP), anti Helicobacter pylori immunoglobulin G (anti-HP IgG), anti-CagA antibody (Ab) and interlukine-6 (IL6). According to angiography reports, participants were divided into patients with mild (n = 69) and with sever CHD (n = 36). To measure the association between CagA positive strains of HP with the severity of CHD, multivariate logistic regression tests were used by adjusting age, sex, history of diabetes mellitus (DM), dyslipidemia (DLP), and/or hypertension (HTN), CRP status and IL-6 level.
RESULTS:
The analysis was concluded on 105 subjects. HP infection and CagA Ab were not significantly higher compared to the patients with severe and mild CHD (P = 0.28 and P = 0.68, respectively). Colonization of CagA positive HP did not significantly associate with severity of CHD (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.33–3. 39).
CONCLUSION:
Colonization of CagA positive HP was not an independent risk factor for severe coronary heart disease.
PMCID: PMC3413081  PMID: 23205045
Helicobacter Pylori; CagA; Coronary Heart Disease; Severity
2.  Is helicobacter pylori infection a risk factor for coronary heart disease? 
ARYA Atherosclerosis  2012;8(1):5-8.
BACKGROUND
There is still controversy about association of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection with coronary heart disease (CHD). This study designed to evaluate this association in a sample of Iranians Population.
METHODS
Medical and drug history as well as fasting blood samples of 112 consecutive patients who were candidate for coronary angiography were taken on catheterization day. Fasting blood samples were used to measure C-reactive protein (CRP), anti H. pylori immunoglobulin G (anti H. pylori IgG) and interlukine-6 (IL6). According to angiography reports, participants were divided into patients with (n = 62) or without CHD (n = 43). To compare the association between H. pylori infection with CHD, multivariate logistic regression tests were used by adjusting sex and age, age and sex plus history of diabetes mellitus (DM), Dyslipidemia (DLP), and/or hypertension (HTN), CRP status and IL-6 level.
RESULTS
Sixty two patients with CHD and 43 participants without CHD were enrolled in the present study. The mean ages of patients with and without CHD were 62.4 261 9.5 and 59.0 261 10.5 years respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis after adjusting for history of DM and/or DLP and/or HTN plus CRP status and IL-6 level showed significant association of H. pylori infection with CHD (OR 3.18, 95%CI 1.08-9.40).
CONCLUSION
H. pylori infection is one of the probable risk factors for CHD independent of history of DM, DLP, HTN, CRP status and IL-6 level.
PMCID: PMC3448393  PMID: 23056092
Helicobacter Pylori; Coronary Heart Disease; Angiography
3.  Non-alcoholic Steatohepatitis in a Sample of Iranian Adult Population: Age is a Risk Factor 
Objectives:
Non-alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) is a cause of cirrhosis. Detecting its preventable causes could be useful in decreasing the disease and its complications. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of NASH in adult population living in Isfahan city as a sample of Iranian population.
Methods:
Blood samples of 2030 individuals referring to Dr. Shariati Hospital for routine health checkup were collected. All individuals with high liver enzymes [aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and/or Alanine aminotransferease (ALT)] were included in the study. Known causes of altered liver enzymes were excluded. Second blood samples were obtained 6 months later and those cases with persistent enzyme elevation were surveyed with ultrasonography.
Results:
In the first survey, 234 individuals (11.5 %) had ALT levels of more than 40 U/L. By rechecking samples after 6 months, 50% of all high serum ALT individuals remained at high level. After conducting complementary biochemical tests, 3.3% of the population was considered to have NASH; 20% of NASH cases did not have any abnormal findings in ultrasonography. Hypercholesterolemia was the most coexisting risk factor in NASH cases. We found a reverse correlation between ALT level and age (P = 0.02).
Conclusions:
The prevalence of NASH was comparable with other countries. According to the significantl correlation between ALT level and age, preventive interactions in younger individuals would decrease the incidence of NASH.
PMCID: PMC3063465  PMID: 21448401
Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis; Population-based study; Liver enzyme; Iran

Results 1-3 (3)