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1.  Short Communication: CD8+ T Cell Polyfunctionality Profiles in Progressive and Nonprogressive Pediatric HIV Type 1 Infection 
AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses  2011;27(9):1005-1012.
Abstract
Pediatric HIV-1 infection is characterized by rapid disease progression and without antiretroviral therapy (ART), more than 50% of infected children die by the age of 2 years. However, a small subset of infected children progresses slowly to disease in the absence of ART. This study aimed to identify functional characteristics of HIV-1-specific T cell responses that distinguish children with rapid and slow disease progression. Fifteen perinatally HIV-infected children (eight rapid and seven slow progressors) were longitudinally studied to monitor T cell polyfunctionality. HIV-1-specific interferon (IFN)-γ+ CD8+ T cell responses gradually increased over time but did not differ between slow and rapid progressors. However, polyfunctional HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cell responses, as assessed by the expression of four functions (IFN-γ, CD107a, TNF-α, MIP-1β), were higher in slow compared to rapid progressors (p=0.05) early in infection, and was associated with slower subsequent disease progression. These data suggest that the quality of the HIV-specific CD8+ T cell response is associated with the control of disease in children as has been shown in adult infection.
doi:10.1089/aid.2010.0227
PMCID: PMC3332389  PMID: 21288139
2.  HLA-Cw*03-Restricted CD8+ T-Cell Responses Targeting the HIV-1 Gag Major Homology Region Drive Virus Immune Escape and Fitness Constraints Compensated for by Intracodon Variation▿ †  
Journal of Virology  2010;84(21):11279-11288.
The potential importance of HLA-C-restricted CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in HIV infection remains undetermined. We studied the dominant HLA-Cw*03-restricted CTL response to YVDRFFKTL296-304 (YL9), within the conserved major homology region (MHR) of the Gag protein, in 80 HLA-Cw*03-positive individuals with chronic HIV infection to better define the efficacy of the YL9 HLA-C-restricted response. The HLA-Cw*03 allele is strongly associated with HIV sequence changes from Thr-303 to Val, Ile, or Ala at position 8 within the YL9 epitope (P = 1.62 × 10−10). In vitro studies revealed that introduction of the changes T303I and T303A into the YL9 epitope both significantly reduced CTL recognition and substantially reduced the viral replicative capacity. However, subsequent selection of the Val-303 variant, via intracodon variation from Ile-303 (I303V) or Ala-303 (A303V), restored both viral fitness and CTL recognition, as supported by our in vivo data. These results illustrate that HLA-C-restricted CTL responses are capable of driving viral immune escape within Gag, but in contrast to what was previously described for HLA-B-restricted Gag escape mutants, the common Cw*03-Gag-303V variant selected resulted in no detectable benefit to the host.
doi:10.1128/JVI.01144-10
PMCID: PMC2953179  PMID: 20739527
3.  Replicative Capacity of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Transmitted from Mother to Child Is Associated with Pediatric Disease Progression Rate▿  
Journal of Virology  2009;84(1):492-502.
Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected infants in the developing world typically progress to AIDS or death within the first 2 years of life. However, a minority progress relatively slowly. This study addresses the potential contribution of viral factors to HIV disease progression in eight infants selected from a well-characterized cohort of C clade HIV-infected infants, monitored prospectively from birth in Durban, South Africa. Three infants were defined as “progressors,” and five were defined as “slow progressors.” We observed that slow-progressor infants carry HIV isolates with significantly lower replicative capacity compared to virus from progressors. Furthermore, our data suggest a link between the attenuated viral phenotype and HLA-B* 57/5801 epitope-specific Gag mutational patterns of the transmitted virus and not to coreceptor usage or to the presence of Nef deletions or insertions. These data underline the importance of virus-host interactions and highlight the contribution of viral attenuation through Gag-specific CD8+ T-cell escape mutations, among other factors, in the control of pediatric HIV infection.
doi:10.1128/JVI.01743-09
PMCID: PMC2798410  PMID: 19828603
4.  Impact of HLA in Mother and Child on Disease Progression of Pediatric Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection▿  
Journal of Virology  2009;83(19):10234-10244.
A broad Gag-specific CD8+ T-cell response is associated with effective control of adult human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The association of certain HLA class I molecules, such as HLA-B*57, -B*5801, and -B*8101, with immune control is linked to mutations within Gag epitopes presented by these alleles that allow HIV to evade the immune response but that also reduce viral replicative capacity. Transmission of such viruses containing mutations within Gag epitopes results in lower viral loads in adult recipients. In this study of pediatric infection, we tested the hypothesis that children may tend to progress relatively slowly if either they themselves possess one of the protective HLA-B alleles or the mother possesses one of these alleles, thereby transmitting a low-fitness virus to the child. We analyzed HLA type, CD8+ T-cell responses, and viral sequence changes for 61 mother-child pairs from Durban, South Africa, who were monitored from birth. Slow progression was significantly associated with the mother or child possessing one of the protective HLA-B alleles, and more significantly so when the protective allele was not shared by mother and child (P = 0.007). Slow progressors tended to make CD8+ T-cell responses to Gag epitopes presented by the protective HLA-B alleles, in contrast to progressors expressing the same alleles (P = 0.07; Fisher's exact test). Mothers expressing the protective alleles were significantly more likely to transmit escape variants within the Gag epitopes presented by those alleles than mothers not expressing those alleles (75% versus 21%; P = 0.001). Reversion of transmitted escape mutations was observed in all slow-progressing children whose mothers possessed protective HLA-B alleles. These data show that HLA class I alleles influence disease progression in pediatric as well as adult infection, both as a result of the CD8+ T-cell responses generated in the child and through the transmission of low-fitness viruses by the mother.
doi:10.1128/JVI.00921-09
PMCID: PMC2748050  PMID: 19605475
5.  Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Specific CD8+ T-Cell Activity Is Detectable from Birth in the Majority of In Utero-Infected Infants▿  
Journal of Virology  2007;81(23):12775-12784.
Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected infants in sub-Saharan Africa typically progress to AIDS or death by 2 years of life in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. This rapid progression to HIV disease has been related to immaturity of the adaptive immune response in infants. We screened 740 infants born to HIV-infected mothers and tracked development and specificity of HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in 63 HIV-infected infants identified using gamma interferon enzyme-linked immunospot assays and intracellular cytokine staining. Forty-four in utero-infected and 19 intrapartum-infected infants were compared to 45 chronically infected children >2 years of age. Seventy percent (14 of 20) in utero-infected infants tested within the first week of life demonstrated HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. Gag, Pol, and Nef were the principally targeted regions in chronic pediatric infection. However, Env dominated the overall response in one-third (12/36) of the acutely infected infants, compared to only 2/45 (4%) of chronically infected children (P = 0.00083). Gag-specific CD4+ T-cell responses were minimal to undetectable in the first 6 months of pediatric infection. These data indicate that failure to control HIV replication in in utero-infected infants is not due to an inability to induce responses but instead suggest secondary failure of adaptive immunity in containing this infection. Moreover, the detection of virus-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in the first days of life in most in utero-infected infants is encouraging for HIV vaccine interventions in infants.
doi:10.1128/JVI.00624-07
PMCID: PMC2169079  PMID: 17881456
6.  Underdosing of antiretrovirals in UK and Irish children with HIV as an example of problems in prescribing medicines to children, 1997-2005: cohort study 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2006;332(7551):1183-1187.
Objective To measure the extent of underdosing of antiretroviral drugs in children.
Design Multicentre cohort study.
Setting Clinical centres in hospitals in the United Kingdom and Ireland in the collaborative HIV paediatric study (CHIPS).
Participants 615 HIV infected children aged 2-12 years receiving antiretrovirals.
Main outcome measures Doses relative to weight and height compared with current recommended doses in 2004 European guidelines.
Results The CHIPS cohort of 934 children comprises 80% of diagnosed HIV infected children in the UK and Ireland between January 1997 and March 2005, of which 66% (615) aged 2-12 years were prescribed antiretrovirals. Actual doses standardised to weight or surface area varied widely across individual drugs, antiretroviral class, and calendar time, with children underdosed (prescribed less than 90% of current recommended doses) from 6-62% child time at risk. Three serious issues in prescribing antiretrovirals, which may also be relevant to paediatric prescribing in general, were identified. Firstly, dosing was inadequate before incorrect recommendations at licensing were later revised when important pharmacokinetic results emerged. Secondly, guidelines stating dosage alternatives (by weight/surface area) for the same drug led to different and inconsistent doses. And, thirdly, ongoing growth was not adjusted for.
Conclusions Largely inadvertently, HIV infected children in the United Kingdom and Ireland have been underdosed with antiretrovirals, highlighting problems applicable throughout paediatric prescribing.
PMCID: PMC1463938  PMID: 16709991

Results 1-8 (8)