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1.  Rcf1 and Rcf2, Members of the Hypoxia-Induced Gene 1 Protein Family, Are Critical Components of the Mitochondrial Cytochrome bc1-Cytochrome c Oxidase Supercomplex 
Molecular and Cellular Biology  2012;32(8):1363-1373.
We report that Rcf1 (formerly Aim31), a member of the conserved hypoxia-induced gene 1 (Hig1) protein family, represents a novel component of the yeast cytochrome bc1-cytochrome c oxidase (COX) supercomplex. Rcf1 (respiratory supercomplex factor 1) partitions with the COX complex, and evidence that it may act as a bridge to the cytochrome bc1 complex is presented. Rcf1 interacts with the Cox3 subunit and can do so prior to their assembly into the COX complex. A close proximity of Rcf1 and members of the ADP/ATP carrier (AAC) family was also established. Rcf1 displays overlapping function with another Hig1-related protein, Rcf2 (formerly Aim38), and their joint presence is required for optimal COX enzyme activity and the correct assembly of the cytochrome bc1-COX supercomplex. Rcf1 and Rcf2 can independently associate with the cytochrome bc1-COX supercomplex, indicating that at least two forms of this supercomplex exist within mitochondria. We provide evidence that the association with the cytochrome bc1-COX supercomplex and regulation of the COX complex are a conserved feature of Hig1 family members. Based on our findings, we propose a model where the Hig1 proteins regulate the COX enzyme activity through Cox3 and associated Cox12 protein, in a manner that may be influenced by the neighboring AAC proteins.
doi:10.1128/MCB.06369-11
PMCID: PMC3318584  PMID: 22310663
2.  Short Communication: Investigation of Incident HIV Infections Among U.S. Army Soldiers Deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq, 2001–2007 
AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses  2012;28(10):1308-1312.
Abstract
The U.S. Army initiated an investigation in response to observations of a possible increase in HIV incidence among soldiers deployed to combat. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected U.S. Army soldiers are not eligible to deploy. Combat presents a health hazard to HIV-infected soldiers and they pose a threat to the safety of the battlefield blood supply and their contacts. All soldiers are routinely screened for HIV every 2 years and those who deploy are also screened both prior to and after deployment. Seroconversion rates were estimated for all soldiers who deployed to Afghanistan or Iraq in the period 2001–2007 and all active duty soldiers who did not. Seroconverters with an estimated date of infection, based on calculation of the midpoint between the last seronegative and first seropositive test date, that was either before or during deployment were eligible for inclusion. Confidential interviews and medical record reviews were conducted to determine the most likely time, geographic location, and mode of infection. Reposed predeployment samples were tested for HIV ribonucleic acid. The HIV seroconversion rate among all soldiers who deployed was less than the rate among those who did not deploy: 1.04 and 1.42 per 10,000 person-years, respectively. Among 48 cases, most were determined to have been infected in the United States or Germany and prior to deployment (n=20, 42%) or during rest and relaxation leave (n=13, 27%). Seven seronegative acute infections were identified in the predeployment period. Subtype was determined for 40 individuals; all were subtype B infections. All were acquired through sexual contact. These findings can inform development of preventive interventions and refinement of existing screening policy to further reduce HIV-infected deployed soldier person time.
doi:10.1089/aid.2011.0363
PMCID: PMC3448093  PMID: 22280248

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