PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-13 (13)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Draft Genome Sequence of a Multidrug-Resistant New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase-1 (NDM-1)-Producing Escherichia coli Isolate Obtained in Singapore 
Genome Announcements  2013;1(6):e01020-13.
We report the draft genome sequence of a New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 (NDM-1)-positive Escherichia coli isolate obtained from a surgical patient. The assembled data indicate the presence of 3 multidrug resistance plasmids, 1 of which shares 100% identity with an NDM-1 plasmid isolated previously from a nearby hospital, suggesting possible local transmission.
doi:10.1128/genomeA.01020-13
PMCID: PMC3868851  PMID: 24356827
2.  Naturally Acquired Human Plasmodium knowlesi Infection, Singapore 
Emerging Infectious Diseases  2008;14(5):814-816.
Naturally Acquired Human Plasmodium knowlesi Infection, Singapore
We report a case of naturally acquired Plasmodium knowlesi in Singapore, a malaria-free country. Diagnosis was confirmed by PCR with validated species-specific primers. In industrialized countries, free-ranging primates are a potential source of P. knowlesi human infection. P. knowlesi infection is a differential diagnosis of febrile illness acquired in Singapore.
doi:10.3201/eid1405.070863
PMCID: PMC2600232  PMID: 18439370
Malaria; zoonoses; parasites; dispatch
3.  Clinical Evaluation of a Low Cost, In-House Developed Real-Time RT-PCR Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Quantitation Assay for HIV-1 Infected Patients 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(3):e89826.
Objectives
HIV-1 viral quantitation is essential for treatment monitoring. An in-house assay would decrease financial barriers to access.
Materials and Methods
A real-time competitive RT-PCR in house assay (Sing-IH) was developed in Singapore. Using HXB2 as reference, the assay's primers and probes were designed to generate a 183-bp product that overlaps a portion of the LTR region and gag region. A competitive internal control (IC) was included in each assay to monitor false negative results due to inhibition or human error. Clinical evaluation was performed on 249 HIV-1 positive patient samples in comparison with the commercially available Generic HIV Viral Load assay. Correlation and agreement of results were assessed for plasma HIV-1 quantification with both assays.
Results
The assay has a lower limit of detection equivalent to 126 copies/mL of HIV-1 RNA and a linear range of detection from 100–1000000 copies/mL. Comparative analysis with reference to the Generic assay demonstrated good agreement between both assays with a mean difference of 0.22 log10 copies/mL and 98.8% of values within 1 log10 copies/mL range. Furthermore, the Sing-IH assay can quantify HIV-1 group M subtypes A–H and group N isolates adequately, making it highly suitable for our region, where subtype B and CRF01_AE predominate.
Conclusions
With a significantly lower running cost compared to commercially available assays, the broadly sensitive Sing-IH assay could help to overcome the cost barriers and serve as a useful addition to the currently limited HIV viral load assay options for resource-limited settings.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0089826
PMCID: PMC3945479  PMID: 24603460
4.  Identification of New CRF51_01B in Singapore Using Full Genome Analysis of Three HIV Type 1 Isolates 
Abstract
A recent HIV-1 molecular epidemiology survey in Singapore identified a novel CRF01_AE/B recombinant form, which accounted for 13 (11.9%) of 109 patient samples. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA from three of these 13 patients was used to generate near full-length sequences to characterize the novel CRF01_AE/B recombinant form. The three isolates had a recombinant structure composed of CRF01_AE and subtype B, and shared identical breakpoints. As the three patients were not epidemiologically linked, this recombinant form has been designated CRF51_01B. Identification of the novel recombinant forms indicates ongoing active HIV-1 transmission in Singapore.
doi:10.1089/aid.2011.0177
PMCID: PMC3332370  PMID: 21902588
5.  High prevalence of CXCR4 usage among treatment-naive CRF01_AE and CRF51_01B-infected HIV-1 subjects in Singapore 
Background
Recent studies suggest HIV-1 inter-subtype differences in co-receptor usage. We examined the correlation between HIV-1 subtype and co-receptor usage among treatment-naïve HIV-1 subjects in Singapore. Additionally, we investigated whether the subtype co-receptor association was influenced by stage of infection.
Methods
V3 sequences of HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 were obtained from 110 HIV treatment-naïve patients and genotypic co-receptor tropism determination was performed using Geno2pheno. Two false-positive rate (FPR) cut-offs, 10% and 5.75% were selected for tropism testing.
Results
Subtype assignment of viral strains from 110 HIV-infected individuals based on partial sequencing of HIV-1 pol, gp120 and gp41 were as follows: 27 subtype B, 64 CRF01_AE, 10 CRF51_01B, and 9 other subtypes. At FPR=10%, 10 (100%) CRF51_01B-infected subjects and 26 (40.6%) CRF01_AE-infected subjects had CXCR4-using virus, compared to 7 (25.9%) subtype B subjects and 1 (11.1%) CRF33_01B-infected subject (P < 0.001). At FPR=5.75%, 10 (100%) CRF51_01B-infected subjects and 20 (31.3%) CRF01_AE-infected subjects had CXCR4-using virus, compared to 4 (14.8%) subtype B and 1 (11.1%) CRF33_01B-infected subjects (P < 0.001). Among those with evidence of seroconversion within 2 years prior to study enrolment, 100% of CRF51_01B-infected subjects had CXCR4-using virus, independent of Geno2pheno FPR.
Conclusion
CRF51_01B and CRF01_AE-infected individuals have higher prevalence of CXCR4-usage compared to subtype B infected individuals. Further studies examining these differences could help optimise the use of CCR5-antagonist in populations with these subtypes, and increase our understanding of HIV-1 biology.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-13-90
PMCID: PMC3585921  PMID: 23421710
CXCR4 usage; HIV-1; treatment-naïve
6.  Molecular Epidemiology of HIV Type 1 in Singapore and Identification of Novel CRF01_AE/B Recombinant Forms 
AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses  2011;27(10):1135-1137.
Abstract
To investigate HIV-1 molecular epidemiology in Singapore, we sequenced portions of three regions of the HIV-1 genome (protease HXB2: 2163 to 2620, gp120 HXB2: 6904 to 7628, and gp41 HXB2: 7817 to 8264) from 212 plasma samples collected between February 2008 and August 2009. From these samples, 109 (51.4%) generated interpretable data in all regions. Sixty-one (56.0%) were identified as CRF01_AE, 26 (23.9%) as subtype B and 14 (12.8%) as possible novel recombinant forms. The main novel recombinant pattern, detected in 13 sequences, had subtype B in protease and gp41 and CRF01_AE in gp120. There was intermixing of subtypes within transmission risk groups. However, 85% of subjects infected with the novel recombinant forms self-identified as men who have sex with men or bisexuals compared with only 41% of individuals infected with CRF01_AE and 62% infected with subtype B (p = 0.001).
doi:10.1089/aid.2010.0364
PMCID: PMC3186691  PMID: 21235306
7.  HIV Type 1 Polymerase Gene Polymorphisms Are Associated With Phenotypic Differences in Replication Capacity and Disease Progression 
Background. Determinants of intersubtype differences in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) clinical disease progression remain unknown.
Methods. HIV-1 subtype was independently determined for 5 separate genomic regions in 396 HIV-1 seroconverters from Rakai, Uganda, using a multiregion hybridization assay. Replication capacities (RC) in samples from a subset of 145 of these subjects were determined. HIV-1 genomic regions and pol RC were examined for association with disease progression. Amino acid polymorphisms were examined for association with pol RC.
Results. In multivariate analyses, the hazard for progression to the composite end point (defined as a CD4+ T-cell count <250 cells/mm3, antiretroviral therapy initiation, or death) among patients with subtype D pol infection was 2.4 times the hazard for those infected with subtype A pol infection (P = .001). Compared with subtype A pol (the reference group), the hazard for progression to the composite end point for subtype D pol infection with a pol RC >67% (ie, the median pol RC) was significantly greater (HR, 4.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9–11.0; P = .001), whereas the hazard for progression to the composite end point for subtype D pol infection with a pol RC ≤67% was not significantly different (HR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.0–4.9; P = .051). Amino acid substitutions at protease positions 62 and 64 and at reverse transcriptase position 272 were associated with significant differences in pol RC.
Conclusions. HIV-1 pol gene intersubtype and RC differences are associated with disease progression and may be influenced by amino acid polymorphisms.
doi:10.1093/infdis/jit425
PMCID: PMC3864385  PMID: 23922373
HIV-1 Subtype; subtype A; subtype D; disease progression; polymerase; replication capacity; amino acid polymorphisms
8.  Trends in First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy in Asia: Results from the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(9):e106525.
Background
Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has evolved rapidly since its beginnings. This analysis describes trends in first-line ART use in Asia and their impact on treatment outcomes.
Methods
Patients in the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database receiving first-line ART for ≥6 months were included. Predictors of treatment failure and treatment modification were assessed.
Results
Data from 4662 eligible patients was analysed. Patients started ART in 2003–2006 (n = 1419), 2007–2010 (n = 2690) and 2011–2013 (n = 553). During the observation period, tenofovir, zidovudine and abacavir use largely replaced stavudine. Stavudine was prescribed to 5.8% of ART starters in 2012/13. Efavirenz use increased at the expense of nevirapine, although both continue to be used extensively (47.5% and 34.5% of patients in 2012/13, respectively). Protease inhibitor use dropped after 2004. The rate of treatment failure or modification declined over time (22.1 [95%CI 20.7–23.5] events per 100 patient/years in 2003–2006, 15.8 [14.9–16.8] in 2007–2010, and 11.6 [9.4–14.2] in 2011–2013). Adjustment for ART regimen had little impact on the temporal decline in treatment failure rates but substantially attenuated the temporal decline in rates of modification due to adverse event. In the final multivariate model, treatment modification due to adverse event was significantly predicted by earlier period of ART initiation (hazard ratio 0.52 [95%CI 0.33–0.81], p = 0.004 for 2011–2013 versus 2003–2006), older age (1.56 [1.19–2.04], p = 0.001 for ≥50 years versus <30years), female sex (1.29 [1.11–1.50], p = 0.001 versus male), positive hepatitis C status (1.33 [1.06–1.66], p = 0.013 versus negative), and ART regimen (11.36 [6.28–20.54], p<0.001 for stavudine-based regimens versus tenofovir-based).
Conclusions
The observed trends in first-line ART use in Asia reflect changes in drug availability, global treatment recommendations and prescriber preferences over the past decade. These changes have contributed to a declining rate of treatment modification due to adverse event, but not to reductions in treatment failure.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0106525
PMCID: PMC4153611  PMID: 25184314
9.  Trends of CD4 cell count levels at the initiation of antiretroviral therapy over time and factors associated with late initiation of antiretroviral therapy among Asian HIV-positive patients 
Introduction
Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been rapidly scaled up in Asia, most HIV-positive patients in the region still present with late-stage HIV disease. We aimed to determine trends of pre-ART CD4 levels over time in Asian HIV-positive patients and to determine factors associated with late ART initiation.
Methods
Data from two regional cohort observational databases were analyzed for trends in median CD4 cell counts at ART initiation and the proportion of late ART initiation (CD4 cell counts <200 cells/mm3 or prior AIDS diagnosis). Predictors for late ART initiation and mortality were determined.
Results
A total of 2737 HIV-positive ART-naïve patients from 22 sites in 13 Asian countries and territories were eligible. The overall median (IQR) CD4 cell count at ART initiation was 150 (46–241) cells/mm3. Median CD4 cell counts at ART initiation increased over time, from a low point of 115 cells/mm3 in 2008 to a peak of 302 cells/mm3 after 2011 (p for trend 0.002). The proportion of patients with late ART initiation significantly decreased over time from 79.1% before 2007 to 36.3% after 2011 (p for trend <0.001). Factors associated with late ART initiation were year of ART initiation (e.g. 2010 vs. before 2007; OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.27–0.59; p<0.001), sex (male vs. female; OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.18–1.93; p=0.001) and HIV exposure risk (heterosexual vs. homosexual; OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.24–2.23; p=0.001 and intravenous drug use vs. homosexual; OR 3.03, 95% CI 1.77–5.21; p<0.001). Factors associated with mortality after ART initiation were late ART initiation (HR 2.13, 95% CI 1.19–3.79; p=0.010), sex (male vs. female; HR 2.12, 95% CI 1.31–3.43; p=0.002), age (≥51 vs. ≤30 years; HR 3.91, 95% CI 2.18–7.04; p<0.001) and hepatitis C serostatus (positive vs. negative; HR 2.48, 95% CI 1.−4.36; p=0.035).
Conclusions
Median CD4 cell count at ART initiation among Asian patients significantly increases over time but the proportion of patients with late ART initiation is still significant. ART initiation at higher CD4 cell counts remains a challenge. Strategic interventions to increase earlier diagnosis of HIV infection and prompt more rapid linkage to ART must be implemented.
doi:10.7448/IAS.17.1.18804
PMCID: PMC3944639  PMID: 24598459
AIDS; antiretroviral therapy; Asia; CD4; HIV; trends
10.  Phylodynamic Profile of HIV-1 Subtype B, CRF01_AE and the Recently Emerging CRF51_01B among Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM) in Singapore 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(12):e80884.
HIV-1 subtype B and CRF01_AE are the predominant infecting subtypes among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Singapore. The genetic history, population dynamics and pattern of transmission networks of these genotypes remain largely unknown. We delineated the phylodynamic profiles of HIV-1 subtype B, CRF01_AE and the recently characterized CRF51_01B strains circulating among the MSM population in Singapore. A total of 105 (49.5%) newly-diagnosed treatment-naïve MSM were recruited between February 2008 and August 2009. Phylogenetic reconstructions of the protease gene (HXB2: 2239 – 2629), gp120 (HXB2: 6942 – 7577) and gp41 (HXB2: 7803 – 8276) of the env gene uncovered five monophyletic transmission networks (two each within subtype B and CRF01_AE and one within CRF51_01B lineages) of different sizes (involving 3 – 23 MSM subjects, supported by posterior probability measure of 1.0). Bayesian coalescent analysis estimated that the emergence and dissemination of multiple sub-epidemic networks occurred between 1995 and 2005, driven largely by subtype B and later followed by CRF01_AE. Exponential increase in effective population size for both subtype B and CRF01_AE occurred between 2002 to 2007 and 2005 to 2007, respectively. Genealogical estimates suggested that the novel CRF51_01B lineages were probably generated through series of recombination events involving CRF01_AE and multiple subtype B ancestors. Our study provides the first insight on the phylodynamic profiles of HIV-1 subtype B, CRF01_AE and CRF51_01B viral strains circulating among MSM in Singapore.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0080884
PMCID: PMC3846621  PMID: 24312505
11.  Accuracy and User-Acceptability of HIV Self-Testing Using an Oral Fluid-Based HIV Rapid Test 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(9):e45168.
Background
The United States FDA approved an over-the-counter HIV self-test, to facilitate increased HIV testing and earlier linkage to care. We assessed the accuracy of self-testing by untrained participants compared to healthcare worker (HCW) testing, participants’ ability to interpret sample results and user-acceptability of self-tests in Singapore.
Methodology/Principal Findings
A cross-sectional study, involving 200 known HIV-positive patients and 794 unknown HIV status at-risk participants was conducted. Participants (all without prior self-test experience) performed self-testing guided solely by visual instructions, followed by HCW testing, both using the OraQuick ADVANCE Rapid HIV 1/2 Antibody Test, with both results interpreted by the HCW. To assess ability to interpret results, participants were provided 3 sample results (positive, negative, and invalid) to interpret. Of 192 participants who tested positive on HCW testing, self-testing was positive in 186 (96.9%), negative in 5 (2.6%), and invalid in 1 (0.5%). Of 794 participants who tested negative on HCW testing, self-testing was negative in 791 (99.6%), positive in 1 (0.1%), and invalid in 2 (0.3%). Excluding invalid tests, self-testing had sensitivity of 97.4% (95% CI 95.1% to 99.7%) and specificity of 99.9% (95% CI: 99.6% to 100%). When interpreting results, 96%, 93.1% and 95.2% correctly read the positive, negative and invalid respectively. There were no significant demographic predictors for false negative self-testing or wrongly interpreting positive or invalid sample results as negative. Eighty-seven percent would purchase the kit over-the-counter; 89% preferred to take HIV tests in private. 72.5% and 74.9% felt the need for pre- and post-test counseling respectively. Only 28% would pay at least USD15 for the test.
Conclusions/Significance
Self-testing was associated with high specificity, and a small but significant number of false negatives. Incorrectly identifying model results as invalid was a major reason for incorrect result interpretation. Survey responses were supportive of making self-testing available.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0045168
PMCID: PMC3444491  PMID: 23028822
12.  Opt-out of Voluntary HIV Testing: A Singapore Hospital's Experience 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(4):e34663.
Introduction
Since 2008, the Singapore Ministry of Health (MOH) has expanded HIV testing by increasing anonymous HIV test sites, as well as issuing a directive to hospitals to offer routine voluntary opt out inpatient HIV testing. We reviewed this program implemented at the end of 2008 at Tan Tock Seng Hospital (TTSH), the second largest acute care general hospital in Singapore.
Methods and Findings
From January 2009 to December 2010, all inpatients aged greater or equal than 21 years were screened for HIV unless they declined or were not eligible for screening. We reviewed the implementation of the Opt Out testing policy. There were a total of 93,211 admissions; 41,543 patients were included based on HIV screening program eligibility criteria. Among those included, 79% (n = 32,675) opted out of HIV screening. The overall acceptance rate was 21%. Majority of eligible patients who were tested (63%) were men. The mean age of tested patients was 52 years. The opt out rate was significantly higher among females (OR: 1.5, 95%CI: 1.4–1.6), aged >60 years (OR: 2.3, 95%CI: 2.2–2.4) and Chinese ethnicity (OR: 1.7, 95%CI:1.6–1.8). The false positive rate of the HIV screening test is 0.56%. The proportion of patients with HIV infection among those who underwent HIV screening is 0.18%. All16 confirmed HIV patients were linked to care.
Conclusion
The default opt-in rate of inpatient HIV testing was low at Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore. Efforts to address individual HIV risk perception and campaigns against HIV stigma are needed to encourage more individuals to be tested for HIV.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0034663
PMCID: PMC3321033  PMID: 22493708
13.  Increased Rate of CD4+ T-Cell Decline and Faster Time to Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-1 Subtype CRF01_AE Infected Seroconverters in Singapore 
PLoS ONE  2011;6(1):e15738.
Background
It remains controversial as to whether HIV-1 subtypes influence disease progression. Singapore offers a unique opportunity to address this issue due to the presence of co-circulating subtypes. We compared subtype CRF01_AE and non-CRF01_AE infected patients, with regards to estimated annual rate of CD4+ T-cell loss and time from estimated data of seroconversion (EDS) to antiretroviral therapy (ART).
Methods
We recruited ART-naive patients with known dates of seroconversion between October 2002 and December 2007 at the Singapore Communicable Disease Centre, the national reference treatment centre. Multilevel mixed-effects models were used to analyse the rate of CD4+ T-cell decline. Time from EDS to ART was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier survival method and compared with Cox proportional hazards models.
Results
54 patients with previously assigned HIV-1 subtypes (24 CRF01_AE, 17 B, 8 B', 1 CRF33_01B, 3 CRF34_01B and 1 G) were observed for 89 patient-years. Subtype CRF01_AE and non-CRF01_AE infected patients did not differ in age, gender, risk factor, rate of symptomatic seroconversion, baseline CD4+ T-cell count, log10 viral load or haemoglobin concentration. The estimated annual rate of CD4+ T-cell loss was 58 cells/mm3/year (95% CI: 7 to 109; P = 0.027) greater in subtype CRF01_AE infected patients compared to non-CRF01_AE patients, after adjusting for age, baseline CD4+ T-cell count and baseline log10 viral load. The median time from EDS to ART was 1.8 years faster comparing CRF01_AE to non-CRF01_AE infected patient with a 2.5 times (95% CI: 1.2-5.0; P = 0.013) higher hazard for ART initiation, after controlling for age, baseline CD4+ T-cell count and baseline log10 viral load.
Conclusions
Infecting subtype significantly impacted the rate of CD4+ T-cell loss and time to treatment in this cohort. Studies to understand the biological basis for this difference could further our understanding of HIV pathogenesis.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0015738
PMCID: PMC3029292  PMID: 21298051

Results 1-13 (13)