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1.  TRM: A Powerful Two-stage Machine Learning Approach for Identifying SNP-SNP Interactions 
Annals of human genetics  2011;76(1):53-62.
SUMMARY
Studies have shown that interactions of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) may play an important role for understanding causes of complex disease. Machine learning approaches provide useful features to explore interactions more effectively and efficiently. We have proposed an integrated method that combines two machine learning methods - Random Forests (RF) and Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) - to identify a subset of important SNPs and detect interaction patterns. In this two-stage RF-MARS (TRM) approach, RF is first applied to detect a predictive subset of SNPs, and then MARS is used to identify the interaction patterns among the selected SNPs. We evaluated the TRM performances in four models: three causal models with one two-way interaction and one null model. RF variable selection was based on out-of-bag classification error rate (OOB) and variable important spectrum (IS). First, we compared the selection of important variable of RF and MARS. Our results support that RFOOB had better performance than MARS and RFIS in detecting important variables. We also evaluated the true positive rate and false positive rate of identifying interaction patterns in TRM and MARS. This study demonstrates that TRMOOB, which is RFOOB plus MARS, has combined the strengths of RF and MARS in identifying SNP-SNP interaction patterns in a scenario of 100 candidate SNPs. TRMOOB had greater true positive rate and lower false positive rate compared with MARS, particularly for searching interactions with a strong association with the outcome. Therefore the use of TRMOOB is favored for exploring SNP-SNP interactions in a large-scale genetic variation study.
doi:10.1111/j.1469-1809.2011.00692.x
PMCID: PMC3243917  PMID: 22150548
polymorphism; interaction; machine learning
2.  Role of Nicotine Dependence on the Relationship between Variants in the Nicotinic Receptor Genes and Risk of Lung Adenocarcinoma 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(9):e107268.
Several variations in the nicotinic receptor genes have been identified to be associated with both lung cancer risk and smoking in the genome-wide association (GWA) studies. However, the relationships among these three factors (genetic variants, nicotine dependence, and lung cancer) remain unclear. In an attempt to elucidate these relationships, we applied mediation analysis to quantify the impact of nicotine dependence on the association between the nicotinic receptor genetic variants and lung adenocarcinoma risk. We evaluated 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the five nicotinic receptor related genes (CHRNB3, CHRNA6, and CHRNA5/A3/B4) previously reported to be associated with lung cancer risk and smoking behavior and 14 SNPs in the four ‘control’ genes (TERT, CLPTM1L, CYP1A1, and TP53), which were not reported in the smoking GWA studies. A total of 661 lung adenocarcinoma cases and 1,347 controls with a smoking history, obtained from the Environment and Genetics in Lung Cancer Etiology case-control study, were included in the study. Results show that nicotine dependence is a mediator of the association between lung adenocarcinoma and gene variations in the regions of CHRNA5/A3/B4 and accounts for approximately 15% of this relationship. The top two CHRNA3 SNPs associated with the risk for lung adenocarcinoma were rs1051730 and rs12914385 (p-value = 1.9×10−10 and 1.1×10−10, respectively). Also, these two SNPs had significant indirect effects on lung adenocarcinoma risk through nicotine dependence (p = 0.003 and 0.007). Gene variations rs2736100 and rs2853676 in TERT and rs401681 and rs31489 in CLPTM1L had significant direct associations on lung adenocarcinoma without indirect effects through nicotine dependence. Our findings suggest that nicotine dependence plays an important role between genetic variants in the CHRNA5/A3/B4 region, especially CHRNA3, and lung adenocarcinoma. This may provide valuable information for understanding the pathogenesis of lung adenocarcinoma and for conducting personalized smoking cessation interventions.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0107268
PMCID: PMC4169410  PMID: 25233467
3.  Male circumcision and the incidence and clearance of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men: the HPV Infection in men (HIM) cohort study 
Background
Reported associations of male circumcision (MC) with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men have been inconsistent.
Methods
4,033 healthy men were examined every six months for a median of 17.5 months. In each study visit, exfoliated cell specimens from the coronal sulcus/glans penis, penile shaft, and scrotum were collected and combined into one sample per person for HPV DNA detection. Samples were tested for 37 HPV types. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the association between MC and the incidence and clearance of HPV infections and specific genotypes.
Results
The overall incidence of new HPV infections did not differ by MC status (for any HPV, adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 1.08, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.91-1.27). However, incidence was significantly lower among circumcised versus uncircumcised men for HPV types 58 (p = 0.01), 68 (p < 0.001), 42 (p = 0.01), 61 (p < 0.001), 71 (p < 0.001), 81 (p = 0.04), and IS39 (p = 0.01), and higher for HPV types 39 (p = 0.01) and 51 (p = 0.02). Despite the lack of an overall association in the risk of HPV clearance by MC (for any HPV, aHR 0.95, 95% CI 0.88-1.02), median times to clearance were significantly shorter among circumcised than uncircumcised men for HPV types 33 (p = 0.02) and 64 (p = 0.04), and longer for HPV types 6 (p < 0.001), 16 (p < 0.001), and 51 (p = 0.02).
Conclusions
MC is not associated with the incidence and clearance of genital HPV detection, except for certain HPV types. The use of a single combined sample from the penis and scrotum for HPV DNA detection likely limited our ability to identify a true effect of MC at the distal penis.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-14-75
PMCID: PMC3925013  PMID: 24517172
Male circumcision; Genital; HPV; Incidence; Clearance
4.  Underutilization of the AIDS Drug Assistance Program: Associated Factors and Policy Implications 
Health Services Research  2011;46(3):982-995.
Background
The AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) provides antiretroviral medications to low-income individuals with HIV infection.
Methods
A prospective cohort study of ADAP utilization, measured using medication possession ratio (MPR), was conducted during the 2008 calendar year at the University of Alabama at Birmingham 1917 HIV Clinic. Multivariable ordinal logistic regression evaluated factors associated with ADAP utilization.
Results
Among 245 patients, MPR quartiles (Q) were the following: Q1<69 percent, Q2 = 69–83 percent, Q3 = 84–93 percent, Q4>93 percent. In ordinal logistic regression, younger age (OR = 0.59 per 10 years; 95 percent CI = 0.44–0.79), nonwhite males (2.18; 1.18–4.04), lower CD4 count (2.79 for <200 cells/mm3; 1.44–5.43), and a history of alcohol abuse (2.11; 1.02–4.37) were associated with poor ADAP utilization.
Conclusions
One quarter of ADAP enrollees had MPR below 69 percent, a level well below that associated with optimal HIV treatment outcomes, indicating a need for programmatic interventions to improve ADAP utilization.
doi:10.1111/j.1475-6773.2010.01223.x
PMCID: PMC3097412  PMID: 21210795
HIV; adherence; public health
5.  SNP-SNP Interaction Network in Angiogenesis Genes Associated with Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(4):e59688.
Angiogenesis has been shown to be associated with prostate cancer development. The majority of prostate cancer studies focused on individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) while SNP-SNP interactions are suggested having a great impact on unveiling the underlying mechanism of complex disease. Using 1,151 prostate cancer patients in the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) dataset, 2,651 SNPs in the angiogenesis genes associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness were evaluated. SNP-SNP interactions were primarily assessed using the two-stage Random Forests plus Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (TRM) approach in the CGEMS group, and were then re-evaluated in the Moffitt group with 1,040 patients. For the identified gene pairs, cross-evaluation was applied to evaluate SNP interactions in both study groups. Five SNP-SNP interactions in three gene pairs (MMP16+ ROBO1, MMP16+ CSF1, and MMP16+ EGFR) were identified to be associated with aggressive prostate cancer in both groups. Three pairs of SNPs (rs1477908+ rs1387665, rs1467251+ rs7625555, and rs1824717+ rs7625555) were in MMP16 and ROBO1, one pair (rs2176771+ rs333970) in MMP16 and CSF1, and one pair (rs1401862+ rs6964705) in MMP16 and EGFR. The results suggest that MMP16 may play an important role in prostate cancer aggressiveness. By integrating our novel findings and available biomedical literature, a hypothetical gene interaction network was proposed. This network demonstrates that our identified SNP-SNP interactions are biologically relevant and shows that EGFR may be the hub for the interactions. The findings provide valuable information to identify genotype combinations at risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer and improve understanding on the genetic etiology of angiogenesis associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0059688
PMCID: PMC3618555  PMID: 23593148
6.  Who tended to continue smoking after cancer diagnosis: the national health and nutrition examination survey 1999–2008 
BMC Public Health  2012;12:784.
Background
It has been estimated that there are approximately 12 million cancer survivors in the United States. Continued smoking after a cancer diagnosis is linked to adverse effects among cancer survivors on overall survival, treatment effectiveness, and quality of life. Little is known about who is more likely to quit smoking after his/her cancer diagnosis. The objective of this study is to evaluate factors associated with smoking cessation in cancer survivors, which to date has not been well studied.
Method
The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999–2008 surveys were used in this study. A total of 2,374 cancer survivors aged 20 and over with valid smoking status in the NHANES 99–08 survey were included in this study. Among them, 566 cancer survivors who regularly smoked at the time of their cancer diagnosis were included in the analyses.
Results
Around 50.6% of cancer survivors smoked regularly prior to their cancer diagnosis and only 36.1% of them quit smoking after their cancer diagnosis. Racial disparity was observed in smoking cessation among cancer survivors. Hispanics (OR = 0.23, 95% CI = 0.10-0.57) were less likely to quit smoking than Whites after their cancer diagnosis.
Conclusion
Two-thirds of cancer survivors continued smoking after cancer diagnosis. Our study observed that the high risk group of continued smokers among cancer survivors is made up of those who are female, younger, Hispanic, with longer smoking history, underweight or with normal weight and without smoking-related cancer. These findings suggest that smoking cessation for cancer survivors should target on the high risk subgroups.
doi:10.1186/1471-2458-12-784
PMCID: PMC3528617  PMID: 22974404
Cancer survivor; Tobacco control; Disparity
7.  Racial differences in the incidence and clearance of human papillomavirus (HPV): The HPV in Men (HIM) Study 
Background
This analysis assessed the acquisition (incidence) and persistence (clearance) of HPV infection by self-reported race among men in The HPV in Men (HIM) Study, a multinational prospective study of the natural history of genital HPV infections.
Methods
Self-reported race was categorized as White, Black, Asian/Pacific Islander (PI), or multiple and mixed race. Genital samples were combined for HPV DNA testing and categorized by any-, oncogenic-, and non-oncogenic HPV infections.
Results
Asian/PI race had significantly the lowest incidence of any-, oncogenic-, and non-oncogenic HPV infection (P < 0.001). In multivariable analyses Asian/PI race was associated with a lower probability of acquiring any- (HR=0.63; 95% CI 0.42–0.95) and non-oncogenic HPV infection (HR=0.61; 95% CI 0.40–0.93) when compared to Whites. No significant associations were evident for Asian/PI race for clearance. Multiple and mixed race was significantly associated with lower probability of acquiring non-oncogenic HPV infection (HR=0.83; 95% CI 0.69–0.99) and borderline significant associations were observed for any HPV (HR=0.91) and oncogenic infections (HR=0.92). Multiple and mixed race was associated with a lower probability of clearing any- (HR=0.92; 95% CI 0.84–1.00) and oncogenic HPV infections (HR=0.85; 95% CI 0.75–0.95).
Conclusion
Asian/PI race had the lowest incidence of HPV and exhibited a lower probability of acquiring new HPV infections. Multiple and mixed race had the second lowest incidence of infection and was associated with a lower probability of acquiring and clearing a HPV infection.
Impact
Race-specific differences in HPV infection could be due to behavior, innate genetic differences, or circulating intratypic HPV variants.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0303
PMCID: PMC3795913  PMID: 23872745
8.  Design, synthesis, and mechanism of action of 2-(3-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenyl)-6-pyrrolidinylquinolin-4-one as a potent anticancer lead 
New 6- (or 6,7-) substituted 2-(hydroxyl substituted phenyl)quinolin-4-one derivatives were synthesized and screened for antiproliferative effects against cancer cell lines. Structure-activity relationship correlations were established and the most promising compound 2-(3-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenyl)-6-pyrrolidin-1-ylquinolin-4-one (6h) exhibited strong inhibitory activity against various human cancer cell lines, particularly non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H522. Additional studies suggested a mechanism of action resembling that of the antimitotic drug vincristine. The presence of a C-ring OH group in 6h will allow this compound to be converted readily to a water soluble and physiochemically stable hydrophilic prodrug. Compound 6h is proposed as a new anticancer lead compound.
doi:10.1016/j.bmcl.2013.06.083
PMCID: PMC3773863  PMID: 23916255
2-(Hydroxyphenyl)quinolin-4-one derivatives; Antiproliferative activity; Anticancer lead development; Prodrug
9.  Natural History of Cutaneous Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection in Men: The HIM Study 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(9):e104843.
Accumulating evidence suggests that cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Little is known about the natural history of cutaneous HPV. A sub-cohort of 209 men with no NMSC history, initially enrolled in the HPV infection in men (HIM) study, were followed for a median of 12.6 months. Epidemiological data were collected through self-administered questionnaires. Cutaneous HPV DNA was measured in normal skin swabs (SS) and eyebrow hairs (EB) for 25 and 16 HPV types in genera β and γ, respectively. Any β HPV infection was more prevalent in SS (67.3%) compared to EB (56.5%, p = 0.04). Incidence in SS was higher than 20 per 1,000 person-months for HPV types 4, 5, 23, 38 and 76. Median duration of persistence of β and γ HPV infection was 8.6 and 6.1 months in EB, respectively, and 11.3 months and 6.3 months, in SS, respectively. Older age (>44 years vs. 18-30 years) was significantly associated with prevalent (SS OR = 3.0, 95% CI = 1.2–7.0) and persistent β HPV infection (EB OR = 6.1, 95% CI = 2.6–14.1). History of blistering sunburn was associated with prevalent (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.3–5.8) and persistent (OR = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.2–4.6) β HPV infection in SS. Cutaneous HPV is highly prevalent in men, with age and blistering sunburn being significant risk factors for cutaneous β HPV infection.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0104843
PMCID: PMC4157763  PMID: 25198694
10.  Incidence and clearance of oral human papillomavirus infection in men: the HIM cohort study 
Lancet  2013;382(9895):877-887.
Background
Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection causes a subset of oropharyngeal cancers. These cancers disproportionately affect men, are increasing in incidence, and have no proven prevention methods. We aimed to establish the natural history of oral HPV infection in men.
Methods
To estimate incidence and clearance of HPV infections, men residing in Brazil, Mexico, and the USA who were HIV negative and reported no history of anogenital cancer were recruited into the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) cohort study. A subset of the cohort who provided two or more oral rinse-and-gargle samples with valid HPV results and who completed a minimum of 2 weeks of follow-up were included in this analysis. Oral rinse-and-gargle samples and questionnaire data were obtained every 6 months for up to 4 years. Samples were analysed for the presence of oncogenic and non-oncogenic HPV infections by the linear array method.
Findings
1626 men aged 18–73 years and with a median follow-up of 12·7 months (IQR 12·1–14·7) were included in the analysis. During the first 12 months of follow-up, 4·4% (95% CI 3·5–5·6; n=115 incident infections) of men acquired an incident oral HPV infection, 1·7% (1·2–2·5; n=53 incident infections) an oral oncogenic HPV infection, and 0·6% (0·3–1·1; n=18 incident infections) an oral HPV 16 infection. Acquisition of oral oncogenic HPV was significantly associated with smoking and not being married or cohabiting, but was similar across countries, age groups, and reported sexual behaviours. Median duration of infection was 6·9 months (95 % CI 6·2–9·3; n=45 cleared infections) for any HPV, 6·3 months (6·0–9·9; n=18 cleared infections) for oncogenic HPV, and 7·3 months (6·0–not estimable; n=5 cleared infections) for HPV 16. Eight of the 18 incident oral HPV 16 infections persisted for two or more study visits.
Interpretation
Newly acquired oral oncogenic HPV infections in healthy men were rare and most were cleared within 1 year. Additional studies into the natural history of HPV are needed to inform development of infection-related prevention efforts.
doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(13)60809-0
PMCID: PMC3904652  PMID: 23827089
oral human papillomavirus; natural history; acquisition
11.  Consistent Condom Use Reduces the Genital Human Papillomavirus Burden Among High-Risk Men: The HPV Infection in Men Study 
The Journal of Infectious Diseases  2013;208(3):373-384.
Background. Data supporting the efficacy of condoms against human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in males are limited. Therefore, we examined the effect of consistent condom use on genital HPV acquisition and duration of infection.
Methods. A prospective analysis was conducted within the HPV Infection in Men Study, a multinational HPV cohort study. Men who were recently sexually active (n = 3323) were stratified on the basis of sexual risk behaviors and partnerships. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, type-specific incidence of HPV infection and clearance were modeled for each risk group to assess independent associations with condom use.
Results. The risk of HPV acquisition was 2-fold lower among men with no steady sex partner who always used condoms, compared with those who never used condoms (hazard ratio, 0.54), after adjustment for country, age, race, education duration, smoking, alcohol, and number of recent sex partners. The probability of clearing an oncogenic HPV infection was 30% higher among nonmonogamous men who always used condoms with nonsteady sex partners, compared with men who never used condoms (hazard ratio, 1.29), after adjustment for country, age, race, education duration, marital status, smoking, alcohol, and number of recent sex partners. No protective effects of condom use were observed among monogamous men.
Conclusions. Condoms should be promoted in combination with HPV vaccination to prevent HPV infection in men.
doi:10.1093/infdis/jit191
PMCID: PMC3699010  PMID: 23644283
condoms; human papillomavirus; males; cohort study; HIM Study
12.  Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Induced Doxorubicin Resistance in Triple Negative Breast Cancer 
BioMed Research International  2014;2014:532161.
Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive histological subtype with limited treatment options and a worse clinical outcome compared with other breast cancer subtypes. Doxorubicin is considered to be one of the most effective agents in the treatment of TNBC. Unfortunately, resistance to this agent is common. In some drug-resistant cells, drug efflux is mediated by adenosine triphosphate-dependent membrane transporter termed adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, which can drive the substrates across membranes against concentration gradient. In the tumor microenvironment, upon interaction with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), tumor cells exhibit altered biological functions of certain gene clusters, hence increasing stemness of tumor cells, migration ability, angiogenesis, and drug resistance. In our present study, we investigated the mechanism of TNBC drug resistance induced by adipose-derived MSCs. Upon exposure of TNBC to MSC-secreted conditioned medium (CM), noticeable drug resistance against doxorubicin with markedly increased BCRP protein expression was observed. Intracellular doxorubicin accumulation of TNBC was also decreased by MSC-secreted CM. Furthermore, we found that doxorubicin resistance of TNBC was mediated by IL-8 presented in the MSC-secreted CM. These findings may enrich the list of potential targets for overcoming drug resistance induced by MSCs in TNBC patients.
doi:10.1155/2014/532161
PMCID: PMC4124237  PMID: 25140317
13.  Role of p73 Dinucleotide Polymorphism in Prostate Cancer and p73 Protein Isoform Balance 
Prostate Cancer  2014;2014:129582.
Background. Molecular markers for prostate cancer (PCa) risks are currently lacking. Here we address the potential association of a dinucleotide polymorphism (DNP) in exon 2 of the p73 gene with PCa risk/progression and discern any disruption of p73 protein isoforms levels in cells harboring a p73 DNP allele. Methods. We investigated the association between p73 DNP genotype and PCa risk/aggressiveness and survival by fitting logistic regression models in 1,292 incident cases and 682 controls. Results. Although we detected no association between p73 DNP and PCa risk, a significant inverse relationship between p73 DNP and PCa aggressiveness (AT/AT + GC/AT versus GC/GC, OR = 0.55, 95%Cl = 0.31–0.99) was detected. Also, p73 DNP is marginally associated with overall death (dominant model, HR = 0.76, 95%Cl = 0.57–1.00, P = 0.053) as well as PCa specific death (HR = 0.69, 95%Cl = 0.45–1.06, P = 0.09). Western blot analyses for p73 protein isoforms indicate that cells heterozygous for the p73 DNP have lower levels of ∆Np73 relative to TAp73 (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Our findings are consistent with an association between p73 DNP and low risk for PCa aggressiveness by increasing the expressed TAp73/∆Np73 protein isoform ratio.
doi:10.1155/2014/129582
PMCID: PMC4109114  PMID: 25097786
14.  Combination Treatment of Tamoxifen with Risperidone in Breast Cancer 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(6):e98805.
Tamoxifen has long been used and still is the most commonly used endocrine therapy for treatment of both early and advanced estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer in pre- and post-menopause women. Tamoxifen exerts its cytotoxic effect primarily through cytostasis which is associated with the accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. Apoptotic activity can also be exerted by tamoxifen which involves cleavage of caspase 9, caspase 7, caspase 3, and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). Down-regulation of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and up-regulation of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bak have also been observed. In addition, stress response protein of GRP 94 and GRP 78 have also been induced by tamoxifen in our study. However, side effects occur during tamoxifen treatment in breast cancer patients. Researching into combination regimen of tamoxifen and drug(s) that relieves tamoxifen-induced hot flushes is important, because drug interactions may decrease tamoxifen efficacy. Risperidone has been shown to be effective in reducing or eliminating hot flushes on women with hormonal variations. In this present study, we demonstrated that combination of tamoxifen with risperidone did not interfered tamoxifen-induced cytotoxic effects in both in vitro and in vivo models, while fluoxetine abrogated the effects of tamoxifen. This is the first paper suggesting the possibility of combination treatment of tamoxifen with risperidone in breast cancer patients, providing a conceivable resolution of tamoxifen-induced side effects without interfering the efficacy of tamoxifen against breast cancer.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0098805
PMCID: PMC4041865  PMID: 24886861
15.  High Grade Prostate Intraepithelial Neoplasia (PIN) is a PSA-independent risk factor for prostate cancer in African American men: results from a pilot study 
Cancer letters  2012;331(2):154-157.
African American men (AAM) demonstrate increased prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates. We investigated known prostate cancer risk factors in AAM. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) and diagnosis of high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) were significant prostate cancer predictors. However, even including AAM with low PSA (<4ng/ml), those with PIN had significantly elevated risk, compared to men without PIN (83.3% vs 6.9%, p<0.0001). In AAM diagnosed with PIN, PSA level was no longer significant (83.3% vs. 92.3%, p=0.593 respectively). Our results suggest that a history of PIN is highly predictive of prostate cancer in AAM, and help provide PSA-independent venues for screening.
doi:10.1016/j.canlet.2012.12.014
PMCID: PMC3603576  PMID: 23268329
prostate cancer; African American men; high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN)
16.  Gene variants in angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis and cutaneous melanoma progression 
Background
Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis are important in the progression of melanoma. We investigated associations between genetic variants in these pathways with sentinel lymph node (SLN) metastasis and mortality in two independent series of melanoma patients.
Methods
Participants at Moffitt Cancer Center were 552 patients, all Caucasian, with primary cutaneous melanoma referred for SLN biopsy. A total of 177 patients had SLN metastasis, among whom 60 died from melanoma. Associations between 238 SNPs in 26 genes and SLN metastasis were estimated as odds ratios and 95%CI using logistic regression. Competing risk regression was used to estimate hazard ratios and 95%CI for each SNP and melanoma-specific mortality. We attempted to replicate significant findings using data from a genome-wide association study comprising 1,115 melanoma patients, who were referred for SLN biopsy from MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), among whom 189 patients had SLN metastasis and 92 patients died from melanoma.
Results
In the Moffitt dataset, we observed significant associations in 18 SNPs with SLN metastasis and 17 SNPs with mortality. Multiple SNPs in COL18A1, EGFR, FLT1, IL10, PDGFD, PIK3CA and TLR3 were associated with risk of SLN metastasis and/or patient mortality. The MDACC data set replicated an association between mortality and rs2220377 in PDGFD. Further, in a meta-analysis, three additional SNPs were significantly associated with SLN metastasis (EGFR rs723526 and TLR3 rs3775292) and melanoma specific death (TLR3 rs7668666).
Conclusions
These findings suggest that genetic variation in angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis contributes to regional nodal metastasis and progression of melanoma.
Impact
Additional research attempting to replicate these results is warranted.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-12-1129
PMCID: PMC3708315  PMID: 23462921
SNP; lymph/angiogenesis; melanoma; sentinel lymph node
17.  Skewed Distribution of IL-7 Receptor-α-Expressing Effector Memory CD8+ T Cells with Distinct Functional Characteristics in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(1):e85521.
CD8+ T cells play important roles in anti-tumor immunity but distribution profile or functional characteristics of effector memory subsets during tumor progression are unclear. We found that, in oral squamous carcinoma patients, circulating CD8+ T cell pools skewed toward effector memory subsets with the distribution frequency of CCR7−CD45RA−CD8+ T cells and CCR7− CD45RA+CD8+ T cells negatively correlated with each other. A significantly higher frequency of CD127lo CCR7−CD45RA−CD8+ T cells or CCR7−CD45RA+CD8+ T cells among total CD8+ T cells was found in peripheral blood or tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, but not in regional lymph nodes. The CD127hi CCR7−CD45RA−CD8+ T cells or CCR7−CD45RA+CD8+ T cells maintained significantly higher IFN-γ, IL-2 productivity and ex vivo proliferative capacity, while the CD127lo CCR7−CD45RA−CD8+ T cells or CCR7−CD45RA+CD8+ T cells exhibited higher granzyme B productivity and susceptibility to activation induced cell death. A higher ratio of CCR7−CD45RA+CD8+ T cells to CCR7−CD45RA−CD8+ T cells was associated with advanced cancer staging and poor differentiation of tumor cells. Therefore, the CD127lo CCR7−CD45RA−CD8+ T cells and CCR7−CD45RA+CD8+ T cells are functionally similar CD8+ T cell subsets which exhibit late differentiated effector phenotypes and the shift of peripheral CD8+ effector memory balance toward CCR7−CD45RA+CD8+ T cells is associated with OSCC progression.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0085521
PMCID: PMC3900423  PMID: 24465587
18.  A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies to identify prostate cancer susceptibility loci associated with aggressive and non-aggressive disease 
Amin Al Olama, Ali | Kote-Jarai, Zsofia | Schumacher, Fredrick R. | Wiklund, Fredrik | Berndt, Sonja I. | Benlloch, Sara | Giles, Graham G. | Severi, Gianluca | Neal, David E. | Hamdy, Freddie C. | Donovan, Jenny L. | Hunter, David J. | Henderson, Brian E. | Thun, Michael J. | Gaziano, Michael | Giovannucci, Edward L. | Siddiq, Afshan | Travis, Ruth C. | Cox, David G. | Canzian, Federico | Riboli, Elio | Key, Timothy J. | Andriole, Gerald | Albanes, Demetrius | Hayes, Richard B. | Schleutker, Johanna | Auvinen, Anssi | Tammela, Teuvo L.J. | Weischer, Maren | Stanford, Janet L. | Ostrander, Elaine A. | Cybulski, Cezary | Lubinski, Jan | Thibodeau, Stephen N. | Schaid, Daniel J. | Sorensen, Karina D. | Batra, Jyotsna | Clements, Judith A. | Chambers, Suzanne | Aitken, Joanne | Gardiner, Robert A. | Maier, Christiane | Vogel, Walther | Dörk, Thilo | Brenner, Hermann | Habuchi, Tomonori | Ingles, Sue | John, Esther M. | Dickinson, Joanne L. | Cannon-Albright, Lisa | Teixeira, Manuel R. | Kaneva, Radka | Zhang, Hong-Wei | Lu, Yong-Jie | Park, Jong Y. | Cooney, Kathleen A. | Muir, Kenneth R. | Leongamornlert, Daniel A. | Saunders, Edward | Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata | Mahmud, Nadiya | Guy, Michelle | Govindasami, Koveela | O'Brien, Lynne T. | Wilkinson, Rosemary A. | Hall, Amanda L. | Sawyer, Emma J. | Dadaev, Tokhir | Morrison, Jonathan | Dearnaley, David P. | Horwich, Alan | Huddart, Robert A. | Khoo, Vincent S. | Parker, Christopher C. | Van As, Nicholas | Woodhouse, Christopher J. | Thompson, Alan | Dudderidge, Tim | Ogden, Chris | Cooper, Colin S. | Lophatonanon, Artitaya | Southey, Melissa C. | Hopper, John L. | English, Dallas | Virtamo, Jarmo | Le Marchand, Loic | Campa, Daniele | Kaaks, Rudolf | Lindstrom, Sara | Diver, W. Ryan | Gapstur, Susan | Yeager, Meredith | Cox, Angela | Stern, Mariana C. | Corral, Roman | Aly, Markus | Isaacs, William | Adolfsson, Jan | Xu, Jianfeng | Zheng, S. Lilly | Wahlfors, Tiina | Taari, Kimmo | Kujala, Paula | Klarskov, Peter | Nordestgaard, Børge G. | Røder, M. Andreas | Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth | Bojesen, Stig E. | FitzGerald, Liesel M. | Kolb, Suzanne | Kwon, Erika M. | Karyadi, Danielle M. | Orntoft, Torben Falck | Borre, Michael | Rinckleb, Antje | Luedeke, Manuel | Herkommer, Kathleen | Meyer, Andreas | Serth, Jürgen | Marthick, James R. | Patterson, Briony | Wokolorczyk, Dominika | Spurdle, Amanda | Lose, Felicity | McDonnell, Shannon K. | Joshi, Amit D. | Shahabi, Ahva | Pinto, Pedro | Santos, Joana | Ray, Ana | Sellers, Thomas A. | Lin, Hui-Yi | Stephenson, Robert A. | Teerlink, Craig | Muller, Heiko | Rothenbacher, Dietrich | Tsuchiya, Norihiko | Narita, Shintaro | Cao, Guang-Wen | Slavov, Chavdar | Mitev, Vanio | Chanock, Stephen | Gronberg, Henrik | Haiman, Christopher A. | Kraft, Peter | Easton, Douglas F. | Eeles, Rosalind A.
Human Molecular Genetics  2012;22(2):408-415.
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple common genetic variants associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer (PrCa), but these explain less than one-third of the heritability. To identify further susceptibility alleles, we conducted a meta-analysis of four GWAS including 5953 cases of aggressive PrCa and 11 463 controls (men without PrCa). We computed association tests for approximately 2.6 million SNPs and followed up the most significant SNPs by genotyping 49 121 samples in 29 studies through the international PRACTICAL and BPC3 consortia. We not only confirmed the association of a PrCa susceptibility locus, rs11672691 on chromosome 19, but also showed an association with aggressive PrCa [odds ratio = 1.12 (95% confidence interval 1.03–1.21), P = 1.4 × 10−8]. This report describes a genetic variant which is associated with aggressive PrCa, which is a type of PrCa associated with a poorer prognosis.
doi:10.1093/hmg/dds425
PMCID: PMC3526158  PMID: 23065704
19.  Identification of 23 new prostate cancer susceptibility loci using the iCOGS custom genotyping array 
Eeles, Rosalind A | Olama, Ali Amin Al | Benlloch, Sara | Saunders, Edward J | Leongamornlert, Daniel A | Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata | Ghoussaini, Maya | Luccarini, Craig | Dennis, Joe | Jugurnauth-Little, Sarah | Dadaev, Tokhir | Neal, David E | Hamdy, Freddie C | Donovan, Jenny L | Muir, Ken | Giles, Graham G | Severi, Gianluca | Wiklund, Fredrik | Gronberg, Henrik | Haiman, Christopher A | Schumacher, Fredrick | Henderson, Brian | Le Marchand, Loic | Lindstrom, Sara | Kraft, Peter | Hunter, David J | Gapstur, Susan | Chanock, Stephen J | Berndt, Sonja I | Albanes, Demetrius | Andriole, Gerald | Schleutker, Johanna | Weischer, Maren | Canzian, Federico | Riboli, Elio | Key, Tim J | Travis, Ruth | Campa, Daniele | Ingles, Sue A | John, Esther M | Hayes, Richard B | Pharoah, Paul DP | Pashayan, Nora | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Stanford, Janet | Ostrander, Elaine A | Signorello, Lisa B | Thibodeau, Stephen N | Schaid, Dan | Maier, Christiane | Vogel, Walther | Kibel, Adam S | Cybulski, Cezary | Lubinski, Jan | Cannon-Albright,  | Brenner, Hermann | Park, Jong Y | Kaneva, Radka | Batra, Jyotsna | Spurdle, Amanda B | Clements, Judith A | Teixeira, Manuel R | Dicks, Ed | Lee, Andrew | Dunning, Alison | Baynes, Caroline | Conroy, Don | Maranian, Melanie J | Ahmed, Shahana | Govindasami, Koveela | Guy, Michelle | Wilkinson, Rosemary A | Sawyer, Emma J | Morgan, Angela | Dearnaley, David P | Horwich, Alan | Huddart, Robert A | Khoo, Vincent S | Parker, Christopher C | Van As, Nicholas J | Woodhouse, J | Thompson, Alan | Dudderidge, Tim | Ogden, Chris | Cooper, Colin | Lophatananon, Artitaya | Cox, Angela | Southey, Melissa | Hopper, John L | English, Dallas R | Aly, Markus | Adolfsson, Jan | Xu, Jiangfeng | Zheng, Siqun | Yeager, Meredith | Kaaks, Rudolf | Diver, W Ryan | Gaudet, Mia M | Stern, Mariana | Corral, Roman | Joshi, Amit D | Shahabi, Ahva | Wahlfors, Tiina | Tammela, Teuvo J | Auvinen, Anssi | Virtamo, Jarmo | Klarskov, Peter | Nordestgaard, Børge G | Røder, Andreas | Nielsen, Sune F | Bojesen, Stig E | Siddiq, Afshan | FitzGerald, Liesel | Kolb, Suzanne | Kwon, Erika | Karyadi, Danielle | Blot, William J | Zheng, Wei | Cai, Qiuyin | McDonnell, Shannon K | Rinckleb, Antje | Drake, Bettina | Colditz, Graham | Wokolorczyk, Dominika | Stephenson, Robert A | Teerlink, Craig | Muller, Heiko | Rothenbacher, Dietrich | Sellers, Thomas A | Lin, Hui-Yi | Slavov, Chavdar | Mitev, Vanio | Lose, Felicity | Srinivasan, Srilakshmi | Maia, Sofia | Paulo, Paula | Lange, Ethan | Cooney, Kathleen A | Antoniou, Antonis | Vincent, Daniel | Bacot, François | Tessier,  | Kote-Jarai, Zsofia | Easton, Douglas F
Nature genetics  2013;45(4):10.1038/ng.2560.
Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in males in developed countries. To identify common prostate cancer susceptibility alleles, we genotyped 211,155 SNPs on a custom Illumina array (iCOGS) in blood DNA from 25,074 prostate cancer cases and 24,272 controls from the international PRACTICAL Consortium. Twenty-three new prostate cancer susceptibility loci were identified at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8). More than 70 prostate cancer susceptibility loci, explaining ~30% of the familial risk for this disease, have now been identified. On the basis of combined risks conferred by the new and previously known risk loci, the top 1% of the risk distribution has a 4.7-fold higher risk than the average of the population being profiled. These results will facilitate population risk stratification for clinical studies.
doi:10.1038/ng.2560
PMCID: PMC3832790  PMID: 23535732
20.  Race and prevalence of human papillomavirus infection among men residing in Brazil, Mexico, and the United States 
HPV causes anal, penile and oropharyngeal cancers in men. Genital HPV prevalence in men appears to vary by world region with men residing in Asia having among the lowest prevalence. Unfortunately, there is little information on prevalence of HPV infection in men by race. The purpose of this study was to examine HPV prevalence by race across three countries. 3,909 men ages 18–70 years enrolled in an ongoing prospective cohort study of the natural history of HPV in men (The HIM Study) were included in the analysis. Participants completed risk factor questionnaires and samples were taken from the penile epithelium and scrotum for HPV detection. HPV testing of the combined DNA extract was conducted using PCR and genotyping. Asian/Pacific Islanders had the lowest HPV prevalence of 42.2% compared to Blacks (66.2%), and Whites (71.5%). The Asian/Pacific Islander race was strongly protective in univariate analysis (prevalence ratio(PR)= 0.59; 95% confidence interval(CI):0.48 – 0.74) and multivariate analysis for any HPV infection (PR= 0.65; 95% CI:0.52 – 0.8). Stratified analysis by lifetime number of female partners also showed strong inverse associations with the Asian/Pacific Islander race. We consistently observed the lowest prevalence of HPV infection among Asian/Pacific Islanders with moderate inverse associations even after various adjustments for potential confounding factors. Unmeasured behavioral factors, sexual mixing with low risk women, and/or race-specific differences in the frequency of germline variations among immune regulating genes may underlie these associations. Further studies among Asian populations that incorporate measures of immuno-genetics are needed to understand this phenomenon.
doi:10.1002/ijc.27397
PMCID: PMC3458422  PMID: 22161806
21.  Polymorphisms in Drug Metabolism Genes, Smoking, and p53 Mutations in Breast Cancer 
Molecular carcinogenesis  2008;47(2):88-99.
Polymorphisms in phase I and phase II enzymes may enhance the occurrence of mutations at critical tumor suppressor genes, such as p53, and increase breast cancer risk by either increasing the activation or detoxification of carcinogens and/or endogenous estrogens. We analyzed polymorphisms in CYP1B1, GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 and p53 mutations in 323 breast tumor samples. Approximately 11% of patients exhibited mutations in p53. Women with mutations had a significantly younger age of diagnosis (P = 0.01) and a greater incidence of tumors classified as stage II or higher (P = 0.002). More women with mutations had a history of smoking (55%) compared to women without mutations (39%). Although none of the genotypes alone were associated with p53 mutations, positive smoking history was associated with p53 mutations in women with the GSTM1 null allele [OR = 3.54; 95% CI = 0.97–12.90 P = 0.06] compared to women with the wild-type genotype and smoking history [OR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.19–2.07], although this association did not reach statistical significance. To test for gene–gene interactions, our exploratory analysis in the Caucasian cases suggested that individuals with the combined GSTP1 105 VV, CYP1B1 432 LV/VV, and GSTM1 positive genotype were more likely to harbor mutations in p53 [OR = 4.94; 95% CI = 1.11–22.06]. Our results suggest that gene–smoking and gene–gene interactions may impact the prevalence of p53 mutations in breast tumors. Elucidating the etiology of breast cancer as a consequence of common genetic polymorphisms and the genotoxic effects of smoking will enable us to improve the design of prevention strategies, such as lifestyle modifications, in genetically susceptible subpopulations.
doi:10.1002/mc.20365
PMCID: PMC3722359  PMID: 17683074
breast cancer; p53; polymorphisms; drug metabolism
22.  Genital Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Concordance in Heterosexual Couples 
The Journal of Infectious Diseases  2012;206(2):202-211.
Background. Few studies have assessed genital human papillomavirus (HPV) concordance and factors associated with concordance among asymptomatic heterosexual couples.
Methods. Genotyping for HPV was conducted with male and female sex partners aged 18–70 years from Tampa, Florida. Eligibility included no history of HPV-associated disease. Type-specific positive concordance (partners with ≥1 genotype in common) and negative concordance (neither partner had HPV) were assessed for 88 couples. Factors associated with concordance were assessed with Fisher exact tests and tests for trend.
Results. Couples reported engaging in sexual intercourse for a median of 1.7 years (range, 0.1–49 years), and 75% reported being in the same monogamous relationship for the past 6 months. Almost 1 in 4 couples had type-specific positive concordance, and 35% had negative concordance for all types tested, for a total concordance of 59%. Concordance was not associated with monogamy. Type-specific positive concordance was associated with an increasing difference in partners’ lifetime number of sex partners and inversely associated with an increasing difference in age. Negative concordance was inversely associated with both the couple's sum of lifetime number of sex partners and the difference in the partners’ lifetime number of sex partners.
Conclusions. Genital HPV concordance was common. Viral infectiousness and number of sex partners may help explain concordance among heterosexual partners.
doi:10.1093/infdis/jis327
PMCID: PMC3490693  PMID: 22539815
23.  Identification and molecular characterization of a new ovarian cancer susceptibility locus at 17q21.31 
Permuth-Wey, Jennifer | Lawrenson, Kate | Shen, Howard C. | Velkova, Aneliya | Tyrer, Jonathan P. | Chen, Zhihua | Lin, Hui-Yi | Chen, Y. Ann | Tsai, Ya-Yu | Qu, Xiaotao | Ramus, Susan J. | Karevan, Rod | Lee, Janet | Lee, Nathan | Larson, Melissa C. | Aben, Katja K. | Anton-Culver, Hoda | Antonenkova, Natalia | Antoniou, Antonis | Armasu, Sebastian M. | Bacot, François | Baglietto, Laura | Bandera, Elisa V. | Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Birrer, Michael J. | Bloom, Greg | Bogdanova, Natalia | Brinton, Louise A. | Brooks-Wilson, Angela | Brown, Robert | Butzow, Ralf | Cai, Qiuyin | Campbell, Ian | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Chanock, Stephen | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Cheng, Jin Q. | Cicek, Mine S. | Coetzee, Gerhard A. | Cook, Linda S. | Couch, Fergus J. | Cramer, Daniel W. | Cunningham, Julie M. | Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka | Despierre, Evelyn | Doherty, Jennifer A | Dörk, Thilo | du Bois, Andreas | Dürst, Matthias | Easton, Douglas F | Eccles, Diana | Edwards, Robert | Ekici, Arif B. | Fasching, Peter A. | Fenstermacher, David A. | Flanagan, James M. | Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra | Giles, Graham G. | Glasspool, Rosalind M. | Gonzalez-Bosquet, Jesus | Goodman, Marc T. | Gore, Martin | Górski, Bohdan | Gronwald, Jacek | Hall, Per | Halle, Mari K. | Harter, Philipp | Heitz, Florian | Hillemanns, Peter | Hoatlin, Maureen | Høgdall, Claus K. | Høgdall, Estrid | Hosono, Satoyo | Jakubowska, Anna | Jensen, Allan | Jim, Heather | Kalli, Kimberly R. | Karlan, Beth Y. | Kaye, Stanley B. | Kelemen, Linda E. | Kiemeney, Lambertus A. | Kikkawa, Fumitaka | Konecny, Gottfried E. | Krakstad, Camilla | Kjaer, Susanne Krüger | Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta | Lambrechts, Diether | Lambrechts, Sandrina | Lancaster, Johnathan M. | Le, Nhu D. | Leminen, Arto | Levine, Douglas A. | Liang, Dong | Lim, Boon Kiong | Lin, Jie | Lissowska, Jolanta | Lu, Karen H. | Lubiński, Jan | Lurie, Galina | Massuger, Leon F.A.G. | Matsuo, Keitaro | McGuire, Valerie | McLaughlin, John R | Menon, Usha | Modugno, Francesmary | Moysich, Kirsten B. | Nakanishi, Toru | Narod, Steven A. | Nedergaard, Lotte | Ness, Roberta B. | Nevanlinna, Heli | Nickels, Stefan | Noushmehr, Houtan | Odunsi, Kunle | Olson, Sara H. | Orlow, Irene | Paul, James | Pearce, Celeste L | Pejovic, Tanja | Pelttari, Liisa M. | Pike, Malcolm C. | Poole, Elizabeth M. | Raska, Paola | Renner, Stefan P. | Risch, Harvey A. | Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna | Rossing, Mary Anne | Rudolph, Anja | Runnebaum, Ingo B. | Rzepecka, Iwona K. | Salvesen, Helga B. | Schwaab, Ira | Severi, Gianluca | Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi | Shu, Xiao-Ou | Shvetsov, Yurii B. | Sieh, Weiva | Song, Honglin | Southey, Melissa C. | Spiewankiewicz, Beata | Stram, Daniel | Sutphen, Rebecca | Teo, Soo-Hwang | Terry, Kathryn L. | Tessier, Daniel C. | Thompson, Pamela J. | Tworoger, Shelley S. | van Altena, Anne M. | Vergote, Ignace | Vierkant, Robert A. | Vincent, Daniel | Vitonis, Allison F. | Wang-Gohrke, Shan | Weber, Rachel Palmieri | Wentzensen, Nicolas | Whittemore, Alice S. | Wik, Elisabeth | Wilkens, Lynne R. | Winterhoff, Boris | Woo, Yin Ling | Wu, Anna H. | Xiang, Yong-Bing | Yang, Hannah P. | Zheng, Wei | Ziogas, Argyrios | Zulkifli, Famida | Phelan, Catherine M. | Iversen, Edwin | Schildkraut, Joellen M. | Berchuck, Andrew | Fridley, Brooke L. | Goode, Ellen L. | Pharoah, Paul D. P. | Monteiro, Alvaro N.A. | Sellers, Thomas A. | Gayther, Simon A.
Nature communications  2013;4:1627.
Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has a heritable component that remains to be fully characterized. Most identified common susceptibility variants lie in non-protein-coding sequences. We hypothesized that variants in the 3′ untranslated region at putative microRNA (miRNA) binding sites represent functional targets that influence EOC susceptibility. Here, we evaluate the association between 767 miRNA binding site single nucleotide polymorphisms (miRSNPs) and EOC risk in 18,174 EOC cases and 26,134 controls from 43 studies genotyped through the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study. We identify several miRSNPs associated with invasive serous EOC risk (OR=1.12, P=10−8) mapping to an inversion polymorphism at 17q21.31. Additional genotyping of non-miRSNPs at 17q21.31 reveals stronger signals outside the inversion (P=10−10). Variation at 17q21.31 associates with neurological diseases, and our collaboration is the first to report an association with EOC susceptibility. An integrated molecular analysis in this region provides evidence for ARHGAP27 and PLEKHM1 as candidate EOC susceptibility genes.
doi:10.1038/ncomms2613
PMCID: PMC3709460  PMID: 23535648
24.  Heat shock proteins HSP27 and HSP70 are present in the skin and are important mediators of allergic contact hypersensitivity 
Proteomic analysis of murine skin has shown that a variety of heat shock proteins (HSPs) are constitutively expressed in the skin. Using murine allergic contact hypersensitivity as a model, we investigated the role of two heat shock proteins – HSP27 and HSP70 – in the induction of cutaneous cell-mediated immune responses. Immunohistochemical examination of skin specimens showed that HSP27 was present in the epidermis and HSP70 was present in both the epidermis and dermis. Inhibition of HSP27 and HSP70 produced a reduction in the DNFB contact hypersensitivity response and resulted in the induction of antigen specific unresponsiveness. Treatment of dendritic cell cultures with recombinant HSP27 caused in the upregulation of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12p70 and IL-12p40 but not IL-23p19, which was inhibited when antibodies to HSP27 were added. DNFB conjugated dendritic cells that had been treated with HSP27 had an increased capacity to initiate contact hypersensitivity responses compared to control dendritic cells. This augmented capacity required TLR4 signaling because neither cytokine production by dendritic cells nor the increased induction of contact hypersensitivity responses occurred in TLR4 deficient C3H/HeJ mice. Our findings indicate that a cascade of events occurs following initial interaction of hapten with the skin that includes increased activity of heat shock proteins, their interaction with TLR4 and, in turn, increased production of cytokines that are known to enhance antigen presentation by T-cells. The results suggest that heat shock proteins form a link between adaptive and innate immunity during the early stages of contact hypersensitivity.
PMCID: PMC3573708  PMID: 19109201
HSP27; HSP70; Contact Hypersensitivity; 1-Fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNFB); Toll-like receptor (TLR)
25.  Six-Month Incidence, Persistence, and Factors Associated With Persistence of Anal Human Papillomavirus in Men: The HPV in Men Study 
The Journal of Infectious Diseases  2011;204(11):1711-1722.
Background. Although there are limited numbers of incidence and persistence estimates for anal human papillomavirus (HPV) in women and in men who have sex with men (MSM), there are no such reports for men who have sex with women (MSW).
Methods. Genotyping was performed on anal samples from men, aged 18–70, from São Paulo, Brazil; Cuernavaca, Mexico; and Tampa, Florida, who provided specimens at enrollment and the 6-month visit of a 4-year prospective study. Eligibility included no history of genital warts or human immunodeficiency virus. A total of 954 MSW and 156 MSM provided evaluable specimens at both visits. Persistence was defined as type-specific infection at each visit.
Results. Incident anal infection was common among both MSM and MSW but generally higher for MSM for HPV groups and specific genotypes. A total of 5.1% of MSM and 0.0% of MSW had a persistent HPV-16 infection at the 6-month visit. Cigarette smoking among MSM and age among MSW were associated with persistent infection with any HPV genotype.
Conclusions. Although anal HPV infection is commonly acquired by both MSW and MSM, incident events and persistence occurred more often among MSM. Cigarette smoking is a modifiable risk factor that may contribute to HPV persistence among MSM.
doi:10.1093/infdis/jir637
PMCID: PMC3203231  PMID: 21964400

Results 1-25 (42)