PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-10 (10)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonist co-administration attenuates opioid withdrawal-mediated spinal microglia and astrocyte activation 
European journal of pharmacology  2012;684(1-3):64-70.
Prolonged morphine treatment increases pain sensitivity in many patients. Enhanced spinal Substance P release is one of the adaptive changes associated with sustained opioid exposure. In addition to pain transmitting second order neurons, spinal microglia and astrocytes also express functionally active Tachykinin NK1 (Substance P) receptors. In the present work we investigated the role of glial Tachykinin NK1 receptors in morphine withdrawal-mediated spinal microglia and astrocyte activation. Our data indicate that intrathecal co-administration (6 days, twice daily) of a selective Tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonist (N-acetyl-l-tryptophan 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzylester (L-732,138; 20 μg/injection) attenuates spinal microglia and astrocyte marker and pro-inflammatory mediator immunoreactivity as well as hyperalgesia in morphine-withdrawn rats. Furthermore, covalent linkage of the opioid agonist with a Tachykinin NK1 antagonist pharmacophor yielded a bivalent compound that did not augment spinal microglia or astrocyte marker or pro-inflammatory mediator immunoreactivity and did not cause paradoxical pain sensitization upon drug withdrawal. Thus, bivalent opioid/Tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonists may provide a novel paradigm for long-term pain management.
PMCID: PMC3565540  PMID: 22724132
opioid-induced hyperalgesia; spinal glia; Tachykinin NK1 receptor; Tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonist
2.  Repeated morphine treatment-mediated hyperalgesia, allodynia and spinal glial activation are blocked by co-administration of a selective cannabinoid receptor type-2 agonist 
Journal of Neuroimmunology  2012;244(1-2):23-31.
Spinal glial activation has been implicated in sustained morphine-mediated paradoxical pain sensitization. Since activation of glial CB2 cannabinoid receptors attenuates spinal glial activation in neuropathies, we hypothesized that CB2 agonists may also attenuate sustained morphine–mediated spinal glial activation and pain sensitization. Our data indicate that co-administration of a CB2-selective agonist (AM 1241) attenuates morphine (intraperitoneal; twice daily; 6 days)-mediated thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia in rats. A CB2 (AM 630) but not a CB1 (AM 251) antagonist mitigated this effect. AM 1241 co-treatment also attenuated spinal astrocyte and microglial marker and pro-inflammatory mediator (IL-1β, TNFα) immunoreactivities in morphine-treated rats, suggesting that CB2 agonists may be useful to prevent the neuroinflammatory consequences of sustained morphine treatment.
doi:10.1016/j.jneuroim.2011.12.021
PMCID: PMC3298577  PMID: 22285397
morphine; spinal glia; CB2 agonist; hyperalgesia; allodynia; pain sensitization
3.  Sustained morphine treatment augments prostaglandin E2-evoked Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide release from primary sensory neurons in a PKA- dependent manner 
European journal of pharmacology  2010;648(1-3):95-101.
Tissue damage leads to pain sensitization due to peripheral and central release of excitatory mediators such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). PGE2 sensitizes spinal pain neurotransmitter such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release via activation of cyclic AMP (cAMP)/Protein kinase A (PKA) -dependent signaling mechanisms. Our previous data demonstrates that sustained morphine pretreatment sensitizes adenylyl cyclase(s) (AC) toward the direct stimulator, forskolin, in cultured primary sensory neurons (AC superactivation). In the present work we investigated the hypothesis that morphine pretreatment also sensitizes ACs toward Gs protein-coupled excitatory modulators (such as PGE2), leading to augmented PKA-dependent CGRP release from PGE2-stimulated primary sensory dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Our results show that sustained morphine treatment potentiated PGE2-mediated cAMP formation and augmented PGE2-evoked CGRP release from cultured primary sensory neurons in a PKA-dependent manner. Our data suggests that attenuation of AC-superactivation in primary sensory neurons may prevent the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.
doi:10.1016/j.ejphar.2010.08.042
PMCID: PMC2955884  PMID: 20826131
Morphine; PGE2; PKA; CGRP release; DRG neurons; opioid-induced hyperalgesia; Gs protein signaling
4.  Intrathecal Raf-1-selective siRNA attenuates sustained morphinemediated thermal hyperalgesia 
European journal of pharmacology  2008;601(1-3):207-208.
Studies have demonstrated that long-term opioid treatment leads to an increased sensitivity to painful (hyperalgesia) or normally innocuous (allodynia) stimuli. The molecular mechanisms that lead to paradoxical pain sensitization upon chronic opioid treatment are not completely understood. Enhanced excitatory pain neurotransmitter (such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)) release in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord may play a role in sustained morphine-mediated paradoxical pain. Recently we have demonstrated that inhibition of Raf-1 attenuates sustained morphine treatment-mediated augmentation of CGRP release in vitro, in cultured primary sensory neurons. In the present study, we show that knockdown of spinal Raf-1 levels in vivo by intrathecal administration of Raf-1-specific siRNA attenuates sustained morphine-mediated thermal hyperalgesia in rats.
doi:10.1016/j.ejphar.2008.10.033
PMCID: PMC2640499  PMID: 18976650
Opioids; Morphine; Raf-1; Hyperalgesia
5.  Quantitative Evaluation of Human δ Opioid Receptor Desensitization Using the Operational Model of Drug Action 
Molecular pharmacology  2007;71(5):1416-1426.
Agonist-mediated desensitization of the opioid receptors is thought to function as a protective mechanism against sustained opioid signaling and therefore may prevent the development of opioid tolerance. However, the exact molecular mechanism of opioid receptor desensitization remains unresolved because of difficulties in measuring and interpreting receptor desensitization. In the present study, we investigated deltorphin II-mediated rapid desensitization of the human δ opioid receptors (hDOR) by measuring guanosine 5′-O-(3-[35S]thio)-triphosphate binding and inhibition of cAMP accumulation. We developed a mathematical analysis based on the operational model of agonist action (Black et al., 1985) to calculate the proportion of desensitized receptors. This approach permits a correct analysis of the complex process of functional desensitization by taking into account receptor-effector coupling and the time dependence of agonist pretreatment. Finally, we compared hDOR desensitization with receptor phosphorylation at Ser363, the translocation of β-arrestin2, and hDOR internalization. We found that in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the hDOR, deltorphin II treatment leads to phosphorylation of Ser363, translocation of β-arrestin2 to the plasma membrane, receptor internalization, and uncoupling from G proteins. It is noteworthy that mutation of the primary phosphorylation site Ser363 to alanine had virtually no effect on agonist-induced β-arrestin2 translocation and receptor internalization yet significantly attenuated receptor desensitization. These results strongly indicate that phosphorylation of Ser363 is the primary mechanism of hDOR desensitization.
doi:10.1124/mol.106.030023
PMCID: PMC2694736  PMID: 17322005
6.  Sustained morphine treatment augments basal CGRP release from cultured primary sensory neurons in a Raf-1 dependent manner 
European journal of pharmacology  2008;584(2-3):272-277.
Recent studies suggest that sustained morphine-mediated paradoxical pain may play an important role in the development of analgesic tolerance. The intracellular signal transduction pathways involved in sustained opioid mediated augmentation of spinal pain neurotransmitter (such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)) release are not fully clarified. Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) plays an important role in the modulation of presynaptic neurotransmitter release. Moreover, we have shown earlier that sustained opioid agonist treatment leads to a Raf-1-dependent sensitization of adenylyl cyclase(s) (AC superactivation), augmenting forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation upon opioid withdrawal (cAMP overshoot). Therefore, in the present study we examined the role of Raf-1 in sustained morphine-mediated regulation of cAMP formation and basal CGRP release in vitro, in cultured neonatal rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We found that sustained morphine treatment significantly augments intracellular cAMP production as well as basal CGRP release from cultured neonatal rat DRG neurons. The selective PKA inhibitor, H-89, attenuates the sustained morphine-mediated augmentation of basal CGRP release, indicating that the cAMP/PKA pathway plays an important role in regulation of CGRP release from sensory neurons. Since our present data also demonstrated that selective Raf-1 inhibitor, GW 5074, attenuated both the cAMP overshoot and the augmentation of CGRP release mediated by sustained morphine in neonatal rat DRG neurons, we suggest that Raf-1-mediated sensitization of the intracellular cAMP formation may play an important role in sustained morphine-mediated augmentation of spinal pain neurotransmitter release.
doi:10.1016/j.ejphar.2008.02.013
PMCID: PMC2375088  PMID: 18328477
Morphine; CGRP; Raf-1; cAMP; PKA; Dorsal root ganglion neurons
7.  Unique agonist-bound cannabinoid CB1 receptor conformations indicate agonist specificity in signaling 
European journal of pharmacology  2007;581(1-2):19-29.
Cannabinoid drugs differ in their rank order of potency to produce analgesia versus other central nervous system effects. We propose that these differences are due to unique agonist-bound cannabinoid CB1 receptor conformations that exhibit different affinities for individual subsets of intracellular signal transduction pathways. In order to test this hypothesis, we have used plasmon-waveguide resonance (PWR) spectroscopy, a sensitive method that can provide direct information about ligand-protein and protein-protein interactions, and can detect conformational changes in lipid-embedded proteins. A recombinant epitope-tagged human cannabinoid CB1 receptor was expressed in insect Sf9 cells, solubilized and purified using two-step affinity chromatography. The purified receptor was incorporated into a lipid bilayer on the surface of the PWR resonator. PWR spectroscopy demonstrated that cannabinoid agonists exhibit high affinity (KD = 0.2 ± 0.03 nM and 2 ± 0.4 nM for CP 55,940 and WIN 55,212-2, respectively) for the purified epitope tagged hCB1 receptor. Interestingly however, these structurally different cannabinoid agonists shifted the PWR spectra in opposite directions, indicating that CP 55,940 and WIN 55,212-2 binding leads to different hCB1 receptor conformations. Furthermore, PWR experiments also indicated that these CP 55,940- and WIN 55,212 - bound hCB1 receptor conformations exhibit slightly different affinities to an inhibitory G protein heterotrimer, Gi1 (KD = 27 ± 8 nM and KD = 10.7 ± 4.7 nM, respectively), whereas they strikingly differ in their ability to activate this G protein type.
doi:10.1016/j.ejphar.2007.11.053
PMCID: PMC2279194  PMID: 18162180
trafficking; G proteins; PWR spectroscopy; functional selectivity
8.  New Paradigms and Tools in Drug Design for Pain and Addiction 
The AAPS journal  2006;8(3):E450-E460.
New modalities providing safe and effective treatment of pain, especially prolonged pathological pain, have not appeared despite much effort. In this mini-review/overview we suggest that new paradigms of drug design are required to counter the underlying changes that occur in the nervous system that may elicit chronic pain states. We illustrate this approach with the example of designing, in a single ligand, molecules that have agonist activity at μ and δ opioid receptors and antagonist activities at cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors. Our findings thus far provide evidence in support of this new approach to drug design. We also report on a new biophysical method, plasmon waveguide resonance (PWR) spectroscopy, which can provide new insights into information transduction in G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) as illustrated by the δ opioid receptor.
doi:10.1208/aapsj080353
PMCID: PMC1764851  PMID: 17025262
drug design; neuropathic pain; bifunctional ligands; plasmon waveguide resonance spectroscopy; GPCRs; opioid receptors; cholecystokinin receptors
9.  New paradigms and tools in drug design for pain and addiction 
The AAPS Journal  2006;8(3):E450-E460.
New modalities providing safe and effective treatment of pain, especially prolonged pathological pain, have not appeared despite much effort. In this mini-review/overview we suggest that new paradigms of drug design are required to counter the underlying changes that occur in the nervous system that may elicit chronic pain states. We illustrate this approach with the example of designing, in a single ligand, molecules that have agonist activity at μ and σ opioid receptors and antagonist activities at cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors. Our findings thus far provide evidence in support of this new approach to drug design. We also report on a new biophysical method, plasmon waveguide resonance (PWR) spectroscopy, which can provide new insights into information transduction in g-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) as illustrated by the δ opioid receptor.
doi:10.1208/aapsj080353
PMCID: PMC1764851  PMID: 17025262
drug design; neuropathic pain; bifunctional ligands; plasmon waveguide resonance spectroscopy; GPCRs; opioid receptors; cholecystokinin receptors
10.  Characterization of a Carrier-Mediated Transport System for Taurine in the Fetal Mouse Heart In Vitro 
Journal of Clinical Investigation  1978;61(4):944-952.
Cardiac taurine levels are elevated in hypertension and congestive heart failure. A possible mechanism for this increase in taurine is an alteration of its uptake. We sought to identify and characterize a carrier-mediated transport system for taurine in the mammalian myocardium utilizing the fetal mouse heart in organ culture. Hearts from fetuses of 16-19 days gestational age used in these studies had an endogenous taurine content of 14.1±0.5 nmol/mg tissue.
The uptake of [3H]taurine was linear for up to 8 h. Taurine was accumulated against a concentration gradient as demonstrated by a net increase in taurine concentration when hearts were incubated in 0.5 mM taurine. [3H]Taurine uptake was saturable, Km = 0.44 mM, temperature dependent, and required sodium. The close structural analogues, hypotaurine and β-alanine, reduced [3H]taurine uptake by 87% when present in 100-fold excess. The α-amino acids alanine, α-aminoisobutyric acid, glycine, leucine, and threonine did not inhibit uptake. Other taurine analogues tested were guanidinotaurine, guanidinopropionic acid, γ-aminobutyric acid, 2-aminoethane phosphonic acid, aminomethane sulfonic acid, 3-aminopropane sulfonic acid, N-acetyltaurine, and isethionic acid. We conclude that a carrier-mediated transport system for taurine exists in the fetal mouse heart based on the demonstration of (a) temperature dependence, (b) saturability, and (c) structural selectivity of the uptake process. Transport was demonstrated to be mediated by a β-amino acid uptake system. In addition, taurine uptake was observed to be sodium dependent, energy dependent, and capable of accumulating taurine against a concentration gradient.
PMCID: PMC372612  PMID: 659583

Results 1-10 (10)