PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-4 (4)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  An insertion mutation in ABCB4 is associated with gallbladder mucocele formation in dogs 
Background
ABCB4 functions as a phosphatidylcholine translocater, flipping phosphatidylcholine across hepatocyte canalicular membranes into biliary canaliculi. In people, ABCB4 gene mutations are associated with several disease syndromes including intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (type 3), primary biliary cirrhosis, and cholelithiasis. Hepatobiliary disease, specifically gallbladder mucocele formation, has been recognized with increased frequency in dogs during the past decade. Because Shetland Sheepdogs are considered to be predisposed to gallbladder mucoceles, we initially investigated ABCB4 as a candidate gene for gallbladder mucocele formation in that breed, but included affected dogs of other breeds as well.
Results
An insertion (G) mutation in exon 12 of canine ABCB4 (ABCB4 1583_1584G) was found to be significantly associated with hepatobiliary disease in Shetland Sheepdogs specifically (P < 0.0001) as well as other breeds (P < 0.0006). ABCB4 1583_1584G results in a frame shift generating four stop codons that prematurely terminate ABCB4 protein synthesis within exon 12, abolishing over half of the protein including critical ATP and a putative substrate binding site.
Conclusions
The finding of a significant association of ABCB4 1583_1584G with gallbladder mucoceles in dogs suggests that this phospholipid flippase may play a role in the pathophysiology of this disorder. Affected dogs may provide a useful model for identifying novel treatment strategies for ABCB4-associated hepatobiliary disease in people.
doi:10.1186/1476-5926-9-6
PMCID: PMC2904718  PMID: 20598156
2.  Pharmacogenetic and Metabolic Differences Between Dog Breeds: Their Impact on Canine Medicine and the Use of the Dog as a Preclinical Animal Model 
The AAPS journal  2008;10(1):110-119.
There is limited information describing species related pharmacogenetic differences in animals. Despite the lack of genetic information in veterinary medicine, breed specific responses to endogenous and exogenous substances have been reported across many species. This finding underscores the importance of obtaining insight into the genotypic and phenotypic variation present across breeds. This article provides a summary of the literature pertaining to canine breed differences in physiology, drug response, drug pharmacokinetics, and metabolic idiosyncrasies. The existing knowledge of pedigrees and the known phenotypes and genotypes of dogs provides important information for determining mode of inheritance, penetration, and other major characteristics of heritable traits. Understanding these breed differences will improve canine population predictions (for canine drug products) and may be of value when extrapolating toxicology data from dogs to humans.
doi:10.1208/s12248-008-9011-1
PMCID: PMC2747081  PMID: 18446511
bioavailability; breed-related differences; canine pharmacodynamics; canine pharmacogenetics; canine pharmacokinetics; drug response; population diversity
3.  Pharmacogenetic and Metabolic Differences Between Dog Breeds: Their Impact on Canine Medicine and the Use of the Dog as a Preclinical Animal Model 
The AAPS Journal  2008;10(1):110-119.
There is limited information describing species related pharmacogenetic differences in animals. Despite the lack of genetic information in veterinary medicine, breed specific responses to endogenous and exogenous substances have been reported across many species. This finding underscores the importance of obtaining insight into the genotypic and phenotypic variation present across breeds. This article provides a summary of the literature pertaining to canine breed differences in physiology, drug response, drug pharmacokinetics, and metabolic idiosyncrasies. The existing knowledge of pedigrees and the known phenotypes and genotypes of dogs provides important information for determining mode of inheritance, penetration, and other major characteristics of heritable traits. Understanding these breed differences will improve canine population predictions (for canine drug products) and may be of value when extrapolating toxicology data from dogs to humans.
doi:10.1208/s12248-008-9011-1
PMCID: PMC2747081  PMID: 18446511
bioavailability; breed-related differences; canine pharmacodynamics; canine pharmacogenetics; canine pharmacokinetics; drug response; population diversity
4.  Doxycycline Induces Expression of P Glycoprotein in MCF-7 Breast Carcinoma Cells 
P-glycoprotein (P-gp) overexpression by tumor cells imparts resistance to multiple antineoplastic chemotherapeutic agents (multiple drug resistance). Treatment of tumor cells with chemotherapeutic agents such as anthracyclines, epipodophyllotoxins, and Vinca alkaloids results in induction of P-gp expression. This study was performed to determine if clinically relevant antimicrobial drugs (i.e., drugs that are used to treat bacterial infections in cancer patients) other than antineoplastic agents can induce expression of P-gp in MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells. Expression of P-gp and MDR1 mRNA was determined in samples from MCF-7 cells that were treated in culture with doxorubicin (positive control) and the antimicrobial drugs doxycycline, piperacillin, and cefoperazone. The functional status of P-gp was assessed using laser cytometry to determine intracellular doxorubicin concentrations. The MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay was used to determine if the cytotoxicity of experimental drugs was related to their ability to induce P-gp expression. MCF-7 cells treated with doxycycline (MCF-7/doxy) were stimulated to overexpress P-gp, whereas cells treated with piperacillin and cefoperazone did not overexpress P-gp. MCF-7/doxy cells were compared to a positive-control subline, MCF-7/Adr, previously selected for doxorubicin resistance, and to MCF-7 cells treated with doxorubicin (MCF-7/doxo). All three sublines overexpressed P-gp and MDR1 mRNA and accumulated less intracellular doxorubicin than did control MCF-7 cells. P-gp expression was induced only by experimental drugs that were cytotoxic (doxorubicin and doxycycline). Doxycycline, a drug that has been used for treatment of bacterial infections in cancer patients, can induce functional P-gp expression in cancer cells, resulting in multidrug resistance.
doi:10.1128/AAC.46.3.755-761.2002
PMCID: PMC127468  PMID: 11850258

Results 1-4 (4)