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1.  Aortic Distensibility and its Relationship to Coronary and Thoracic Atherosclerosis Plaque and Morphology by MDCT: Insights from the ROMICAT Trial 
International journal of cardiology  2012;167(4):1616-1621.
Background
Multi-detector cardiac computed tomography (CT) allows for simultaneous assessment of aortic distensibility (AD), coronary atherosclerosis, and thoracic aortic atherosclerosis.
Objectives
We sought to determine the relationship of AD to the presence and morphological features in coronary and thoracic atherosclerosis.
Methods
In 293 patients (53±12 years, 63% male), retrospectively-gated MDCT were performed. We measured intraluminal aortic areas across 10 phases of the cardiac cycle (multiphase reformation 10% increments) at pre-defined locations to calculate the ascending, descending, and local AD (at locations of thoracic plaque). AD was calculated as maximum change in area/(minimum area × pulse pressure). Coronary and thoracic plaques were categorized as calcified, mixed, or non-calcified.
Results
Ascending and descending AD were lower in patients with any coronary plaque, calcified or mixed plaque than those without (all p<0.0001) but not with non-calcified coronary plaque (p≥0.46). Per 1 mmHg−110−3 increase in ascending and descending AD, there was an 18–29% adjusted risk reduction for having any coronary, calcified plaque, or mixed coronary plaque (ascending AD only) (all p≤0.04). AD was not associated with non-calcified coronary plaque or when age was added to the models (all p>0.39). Local AD was lower at locations of calcified and mixed thoracic plaque when compared to non-calcified thoracic atherosclerosis (p<0.04).
Conclusions
A stiffer, less distensible aorta is associated with coronary and thoracic atherosclerosis, particularly in the presence of calcified and mixed plaques, suggesting that the mechanism of atherosclerosis in small and large vessels is similar and influenced by advancing age.
doi:10.1016/j.ijcard.2012.04.107
PMCID: PMC3419779  PMID: 22578738
aortic distensibility; coronary atherosclerosis; thoracic atherosclerosis; peripheral vascular disease; computed tomography; cardiovascular aging
2.  Using Keynote to Present Radiology Images 
Journal of Digital Imaging  2010;24(5):844-847.
Numerous articles have offered instructions for working with advanced radiology images in Microsoft PowerPoint (Redmond, WA); however, no articles have detailed instructions to do the same on alternative presentation software. Apple Macintosh (Cupertino, CA) computers are gaining popularity with many radiologists, due in part to the availability of a powerful, free, open-source Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) viewing and manipulating software OsiriX (http://www.osirix-viewer.com). Apple’s own presentation software, Keynote, is particularly effective in dealing with medical images and cine clips. This article demonstrates how to use Apple’s Keynote software to present radiology images and scrollable image stacks, without third-party add-on software. The article also illustrates how to compress media files and protect patient information in Keynote presentations. Lastly, it addresses the steps to converting between PowerPoint and Keynote file formats. Apple’s Keynote software enables quick and efficient addition of multiple static images or scrollable image stacks, compression of media files, and removal of patient information. These functions can be accomplished by inexperienced users with no software modifications.
doi:10.1007/s10278-010-9345-y
PMCID: PMC3180549  PMID: 20978920
Computers in medicine; Radiology Information Systems (RIS); Radiology teaching file; Image processing; Image display; Productivity; Keynote

Results 1-2 (2)