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1.  Meningeal Layers Around Anterior Clinoid Process as a Delicate Area in Extradural Anterior Clinoidectomy : Anatomical and Clinical Study 
Objective
Removal of the anterior clinoid process (ACP) is an essential process in the surgery of giant or complex aneurysms located near the proximal internal carotid artery or the distal basilar artery. An extradural clinoidectomy must be performed within the limits of the meningeal layers surrounding the ACP to prevent morbid complications. To identify the safest method of extradural exposure of the ACP, anatomical studies were done on cadaver heads.
Methods
Anatomical dissections for extradural exposure of the ACP were performed on both sides of seven cadavers. Before dividing the frontotemporal dural fold (FTDF), we measured its length from the superomedial apex attached to the periorbita to the posterolateral apex which connects to the anterosuperior end of the cavernous sinus.
Results
The average length of the FTDF on cadaver dissections was 7 mm on the right side and 7.14 mm on the left side. Cranial nerves were usually exposed when cutting FTDF more than 7 mm of the FTDF.
Conclusion
The most delicate area in an extradural anterior clinoidectomy is the junction of the FTDF and the anterior triangular apex of the cavernous sinus. The FTDF must be cut from the anterior side of the triangle at the periorbital side rather than from the dural side. The length of the FTDF incision must not exceed 7 mm to avoid cranial nerve injury.
doi:10.3340/jkns.2012.52.4.391
PMCID: PMC3488650  PMID: 23133730
Extradural clinoidectomy; Frontotemporal dural fold; Superior orbital fissure; Anatomical study
2.  Spontaneous Cervical Epidural Hematoma Causing Brown-Sequard Syndrome 
Korean Journal of Spine  2012;9(3):297-299.
Spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma (SCEH) is a rare clinical entity and has a varied etiology. Urgent surgical decompression should be done to prevent serious permanent neurologic deficits. We describe a 59-year-old female who presented with Brown-Sequard syndrome due to spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma. Initially, she was misdiagnosed as cerebrovascular accident. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging revealed epidural hematoma to the right of the spinal cord extending from C3 to C6. She later underwent surgical evacuation and had complete restoration of neurologic function. The outcome in SCEH is essentially determined by the time taken from onset of the symptom to operation. Therefore, early and precise diagnosis such as careful history taking and MRI evaluation is mandatory.
doi:10.14245/kjs.2012.9.3.297
PMCID: PMC4431024  PMID: 25983837
Spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma; Brown-Sequard syndrome; Surgical decompression

Results 1-2 (2)