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1.  Association Factors for CT Angiography Spot Sign and Hematoma Growth in Korean Patients with Acute Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage : A Single-Center Cohort Study 
Objective
This study was conducted to clarify the association factors and clinical significance of the CT angiography (CTA) spot sign and hematoma growth in Korean patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH).
Methods
We retrospectively collected the data of 287 consecutive patients presenting with acute ICH who arrived within 12 hours of ictus. Baseline clinical and radiological characteristics as well as the mortality rate within one month were assessed. A binary logistic regression was conducted to obtain association factors for the CTA spot sign and hematoma growth.
Results
We identified a CTA spot sign in 40 patients (13.9%) and hematoma growth in 78 patients (27.2%). An elapsed time to CT scan of less than 3 hours (OR, 5.14; 95% CI, 1.76-15.02; p=0.003) was associated with the spot sign. A CTA spot sign (OR, 5.70; 95% CI, 2.70-12.01; p<0.001), elevated alanine transaminase (GPT) level >40 IU (OR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.01-4.01; p=0.047), and an international normalized ratio ≥1.8 or warfarin medication (OR, 5.64; 95% CI, 1.29-24.57; p=0.021) were independent predictors for hematoma growth. Antiplatelet agent medication (OR, 4.92; 95% CI, 1.31-18.50; p=0.019) was significantly associated with hematoma growth within 6 hours of ictus.
Conclusion
As previous other populations, CTA spot sign was a strong predictor for hematoma growth especially in hyper-acute stage of ICH in Korea. Antithrombotics medication might also be associated with hyper-acute hematoma growth. In our population, elevated GPT was newly identified as a predictor for hematoma growth and its effect for hematoma growth is necessary to be confirmed through a further research.
doi:10.3340/jkns.2014.56.4.295
PMCID: PMC4219186  PMID: 25371778
Intracerebral hemorrhage; CT angiography; Spot sign; Hematoma growth; Antithrombotics; Alanine transaminase
2.  Long-Term Incidence and Predicting Factors of Cranioplasty Infection after Decompressive Craniectomy 
Objective
The predictors of cranioplasty infection after decompressive craniectomy have not yet been fully characterized. The objective of the current study was to compare the long-term incidences of surgical site infection according to the graft material and cranioplasty timing after craniectomy, and to determine the associated factors of cranioplasty infection.
Methods
A retrospective cohort study was conducted to assess graft infection in patients who underwent cranioplasty after decompressive craniectomy between 2001 and 2011 at a single-center. From a total of 197 eligible patients, 131 patients undergoing 134 cranioplasties were assessed for event-free survival according to graft material and cranioplasty timing after craniectomy. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression methods were employed, with cranioplasty infection identified as the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were also evaluated, including autogenous bone resorption, epidural hematoma, subdural hematoma and brain contusion.
Results
The median follow-up duration was 454 days (range 10 to 3900 days), during which 14 (10.7%) patients suffered cranioplasty infection. There was no significant difference between the two groups for event-free survival rate for cranioplasty infection with either a cryopreserved or artificial bone graft (p=0.074). Intergroup differences according to cranioplasty time after craniectomy were also not observed (p=0.083). Poor neurologic outcome at cranioplasty significantly affected the development of cranioplasty infection (hazard ratio 5.203, 95% CI 1.075 to 25.193, p=0.04).
Conclusion
Neurologic status may influence cranioplasty infection after decompressive craniectomy. A further prospective study about predictors of cranioplasty infection including graft material and cranioplasty timing is necessary.
doi:10.3340/jkns.2012.52.4.396
PMCID: PMC3488651  PMID: 23133731
Decompressive craniectomy; Cranioplasty infection; Neurologic outcome; Graft material; Cranioplasty timing
3.  The Quality of Life of Patients with Good Outcomes after Anterior Circulation Aneurysm Surgery Assessed by the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument-Korean Version 
Objective
Even in the patients with neurologically good outcome after intracranial aneurysm surgery, their perception of health is an important outcome issue. This study aimed to investigate the quality of life (QOL) and its predictors of patients who had a good outcome following anterior circulation aneurysm surgery as using the World Health Organization Quality of Life instrument-Korean version.
Methods
We treated 280 patients with 290 intracranial aneurysms for 2 years. This questionnaire was taken and validated by 99 patients whose Glasgow Outcome Scale score was 4 and more and Global deterioration scale 3 and less at 6 months after the operation, and 85 normal persons. Each domain and facet was compared between the two groups, and a subgroup analysis was performed on the QOL values and hospital expenses of the aneurysm patients according to the type of craniotomy, approach, bleeding of the aneurysm and brain injury.
Results
Aneurysm patients showed a lower quality of life compared with control patients in level of independence, psychological, environmental, and spiritual domains. In the environmental domain, there were significant intergroup differences according to the type of craniotomy and the surgical approach used on the patients (p<0.05). The hospital charges were also significantly different according to the type of craniotomy (p<0.05).
Conclusion
Despite good neurological status, patients surgically treated for anterior circulation aneurysm have a low quality of life. The craniotomy size may affect the QOL of patients who underwent an anterior circulation aneurysm surgery and exhibited a good outcome.
doi:10.3340/jkns.2012.52.3.179
PMCID: PMC3483316  PMID: 23115658
Anterior circulation aneurysm; Quality of life; Craniotomy size; Surgical approach
4.  Motor-Evoked Potential Confirmation of Functional Improvement by Transplanted Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell in the Ischemic Rat Brain 
This study investigated the effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on the motor pathway in the transient ischemic rat brain that were transplanted through the carotid artery, measuring motor-evoked potential (MEP) in the four limbs muscle and the atlantooccipital membrane, which was elicited after monopolar and bipolar transcortical stimulation. After monopolar stimulation, the latency of MEP was significantly prolonged, and the amplitude was less reduced in the BMSC group in comparison with the control group (P < .05). MEPs induced by bipolar stimulation in the left forelimb could be measured in 40% of the BMSC group and the I wave that was not detected in the control group was also detected in 40% of the BMSC group. Our preliminary results imply that BMSCs transplanted to the ischemic rat brain mediate effects on the functional recovery of the cerebral motor cortex and the motor pathway.
doi:10.1155/2011/238409
PMCID: PMC3134108  PMID: 21772790
5.  Critical Use of Balloon Angioplasty after Recanalization Failure with Retrievable Stent in Acute Cerebral Artery Occlusion 
Objective
Sudden major cerebral artery occlusion often resists recanalization with currently available techniques or can results in massive symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) after thrombolytic therapy. The purpose of this study was to examine mechanical recanalization with a retrievable self-expanding stent and balloon in acute intracranial artery occlusions.
Methods
Twenty-eight consecutive patients with acute intracranial artery occlusions were treated with a Solitaire retrievable stent. Balloon angioplasty was added if successful recanalization was not achieved after stent retrieval. The angiographic outcome was assessed by Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (TICI) and the clinical outcomes were assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS).
Results
At baseline, mean age was 69.4 years and mean initial NIHSS score was 12.5. A recanalization to TICI 2 or 3 was achieved in 24 patients (85%) after stent retrieval. Successful recanalization was achieved after additional balloon angioplasty in 4 patients. At 90-day follow-up, 24 patients (85%) had a NIHSS improvement of ≥4 and 17 patients (60%) had a good outcome (mRS ≤2). Although there was sICH, there was one death associated with the procedure.
Conclusion
Mechanical thromboembolectomy with a retrievable stent followed by additional balloon angioplasty is a safe and effective first-line therapy for acute intracranial artery occlusions especially in case of unsuccessful recanalization after stent thrombectomy.
doi:10.3340/jkns.2013.53.2.77
PMCID: PMC3611063  PMID: 23560170
Acute cerebral artery occlusion; Mechanical recanalization; Retrievable stent; Balloon angioplasty
6.  A Pilot Study for the Neuroprotective Effect of Gongjin-dan on Transient Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion-Induced Ischemic Rat Brain 
In this study, we investigated whether gongjin-dan improves functional recovery and has neuroprotective effects on reducing the infarct volume after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Infarct volume was measured using TTC staining and glucose utilization by F-18 FDG PET. Functional improvement was evaluated with the Rota-rod, treadmill, Garcia score test, and adhesive removal test. At 14 days after MCAo, neuronal cell survival, astrocytes expansion, and apoptosis were assessed by immunohistofluorescence staining in the peri-infarct region. Also, the expression of neurotrophic factors and inflammatory cytokines such as VEGF, BDNF, Cox-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-1α was measured in ischemic hemisphere regions. The gongjin-dan-treated group showed both reduced infarct volume and increased glucose utilization. Behavior tests demonstrated a significant improvement compared to the control. Also in the gongjin-dan treated group, NeuN-positive cells were increased and number of astrocytes, microglia, and apoptotic cells was significantly decreased compared with the control group in the ischemic peri-infarct area. Furthermore, the expression of VEGF and BDNF was increased and level of Cox-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-1α was decreased. These results suggest that gongjin-dan may improve functional outcome through the rapid restoration of metabolism and can be considered as a potential neuroprotective agent.
doi:10.1155/2012/682720
PMCID: PMC3375177  PMID: 22719787
7.  Effect of Combination Therapy with Sodium Ozagrel and Panax Ginseng on Transient Cerebral Ischemia Model in Rats 
Sodium ozagrel (SO) prevents platelet aggregation and vasoconstriction in the cerebral ischemia. It plays an important role in the prevention of brain damage induced by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. Recently, many animal studies have suggested that the Panax ginseng (PG) has neuroprotective effects in the ischemic brain. In this study, we assessed the neuroprotective effects that come from a combination therapy of SO and PG in rat models with middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Animals with MCAO were assigned randomly to one of the following four groups: (1) control (Con) group, (2) SO group (3 mg/kg, intravenously), (3) PG group (200 mg/kg, oral feeding), and (4) SO + PG group. The rats were subjected to a neurobehavior test including adhesive removal test and rotarod test at 1, 3, 7, 10, and 15 days after MCAO. The cerebral ischemic volume was quantified by Metamorph imaging software after 2-3-5-triphenyltetrazolium (TTC) staining. The neuronal cell survival and astrocytes expansion were assessed by immunohistofluorescence staining. In the adhesive removal test, the rats of PG or SO + PG group showed significantly better performance than those of the control group (Con: 88.1 ± 24.8, PG: 43.6 ± 11, SO + PG: 11.8 ± 7, P < .05). Notably, the combination therapy group (SO + PG) showed better performance than the SO group alone (SO: 56 ± 12, SO + PG: 11.8 ± 7, P < .05). In TTC staining for infarct volume, cerebral ischemic areas were also significantly reduced in the PG group and SO + PG group (Con: 219 ± 32, PG: 117 ± 8, SO + PG: 99 ± 11, P < .05). Immunohistofluorescence staining results showed that the group which received SO + PG group therapy had neuron cells in the normal range. They also had a low number of astrocytes and apoptotic cells compared with the control or SO group in the peri-infarction area. During astrocytes staining, compared to the SO + PG group, the PG group showed only minor differences in the number of NeuN-positive cells and quantitative analysis of infarct volume. In conclusion, these studies showed that in MCAO rat models, the combination therapy with SO and PG may provide better neuroprotective effects such as higher neuronal cell survival and inhibition of astrocytes expansion than monotherapy with SO alone.
doi:10.1155/2010/893401
PMCID: PMC3022223  PMID: 21274269
8.  Isolated Sphenoid Sinus Mucocele Presenting as Third Nerve Palsy 
A sphenoid mucocele often presents late due to its deep seated anatomical site. And it has varied presentation due to its loose relationship to the cavernous sinus and the base of the skull. We describe a case of large sphenoid sinus mucocele. A middle aged old man suddenly developed third cranial nerve palsy. Brain imaging study revealed an isolated sphenoid sinus mucocele, compressing right cavernous sinus. Endoscopic marsupialization of the mucocele via transnasal approach led to complete resolution of the third cranial nerve palsy. Involvement of the third cranial nerve in isolated mucocele is rare but important neurosurgical implications which must be excluded. In addition, proper and timely treatment must be performed to avoid permanent neurologic deficit.
doi:10.3340/jkns.2010.48.4.360
PMCID: PMC2982917  PMID: 21113366
Sphenoid sinus mucocele; Third nerve palsy; Transnasal approach

Results 1-8 (8)