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1.  Locations and Clinical Significance of Non-Hemorrhagic Brain Lesions in Diffuse Axonal Injuries 
Objective
Detection of focal non-hemorrhagic lesion (NHL) has become more efficient in diffuse axonal injury (DAI) patients using an MRI. The aims of this study are to find out the radiological distribution, progress of NHL and its clinical significance.
Methods
Between September 2005 and October 2011, 32 individuals with NHLs on brain MRI were enrolled. NHLs were classified by brain location into 4 major districts and 13 detailed locations including cortical and subcortical, corpus callosum, deep nuclei and adjacent area, and brainstem. The severity of NHL was scored from grades 1 to 4, according to the number of districts involved. Fourteen patients with NHL were available for MRI follow-up and an investigation of the changes was conducted.
Results
Thirty-two patients had 59 NHLs. The most common district of NHL was cortical and subcortical area; 15 patients had 20 NHSs. However the most common specific location was the splenium of the corpus callosum; 14 patients had 14 lesions. The more lesions patients had, the lower the GCS, however, this was not a statistically meaningful difference. On follow-up MRI in 14 patients, out of 24 lesions, 13 NHLs resolved, 5 showed cystic change, and 6 showed atrophic changes.
Conclusion
NHLs were located most commonly in the splenium and occur frequently in the thalamus and the mesial temporal lobe. Because most NHS occur concomitantly with hemorrhagic lesions, it was difficult to determine their effects on prognosis. Since most NHLs resolve completely, they are probably less significant to prognosis than hemorrhagic lesions.
doi:10.3340/jkns.2012.52.4.377
PMCID: PMC3488648  PMID: 23133728
Traumatic brain injury; Diffuse axonal injury; Magnetic resonance imaging; Corpus callosum; Non-hemorrhagic
2.  Unilateral Thrombosis of a Deep Cerebral Vein Associated with Transient Unilateral Thalamic Edema 
Symptoms of deep cerebral vein thrombosis (DCVT) are variable and nonspecific. Radiologic findings are essential for the diagnoses. In the majority of cases of deep internal cerebral venous thrombosis, the thalamus is affected bilaterally, and venous hypertension by thrombosis causes parenchymal edema or venous infarction and may sometimes cause venous hemorrhage. Intravenous injections of mannitol can be administered or decompressive craniectomy can be performed for reduction of intracranial pressure. The objectives of antithrombotic treatment in DCVT include recanalization of the sinus or vein, and prevention of propagation of the thrombus. Herein, the authors report DCVT which was successfully treated by low molecular weight heparin.
doi:10.7461/jcen.2012.14.3.233
PMCID: PMC3491220  PMID: 23210053
Intracranial thrombosis; Venous thrombosis; Cerebral infarction; Brain edema

Results 1-2 (2)