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1.  The Angelina Jolie effect: how high celebrity profile can have a major impact on provision of cancer related services 
Introduction
It is frequent for news items to lead to a short lived temporary increase in interest in a particular health related service, however it is rare for this to have a long lasting effect. In 2013, in the UK in particular, there has been unprecedented publicity in hereditary breast cancer, with Angelina Jolie’s decision to have genetic testing for the BRCA1 gene and subsequently undergo risk reducing mastectomy (RRM), and a pre-release of the NICE guidelines on familial breast cancer in January and their final release on 26th June. The release of NICE guidelines created a lot of publicity over the potential for use of chemoprevention using tamoxifen or raloxifene. However, the longest lasting news story was the release of details of film actress Angelina Jolie’s genetic test and surgery.
Methods
To assess the potential effects of the ‘Angelina Jolie’ effect, referral data specific to breast cancer family history was obtained from around the UK for the years 2012 and 2013. A consortium of over 30 breast cancer family history clinics that have contributed to two research studies on early breast surveillance were asked to participate as well as 10 genetics centres. Monthly referrals to each service were collated and increases from 2012 to 2013 assessed.
Results
Data from 12 family history clinics and 9 regional genetics services showed a rise in referrals from May 2013 onwards. Referrals were nearly 2.5 fold in June and July 2013 from 1,981 (2012) to 4,847 (2013) and remained at around two-fold to October 2013. Demand for BRCA1/2 testing almost doubled and there were also many more enquiries for risk reducing mastectomy. Internal review shows that there was no increase in inappropriate referrals.
Conclusions
The Angelina Jolie effect has been long lasting and global, and appears to have increased referrals to centres appropriately.
doi:10.1186/s13058-014-0442-6
PMCID: PMC4303122  PMID: 25510853
2.  Mosaic PPM1D mutations are associated with predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer 
Nature  2012;493(7432):406-410.
Improved sequencing technologies offer unprecedented opportunities for investigating the role of rare genetic variation in common disease. However, there are considerable challenges with respect to study design, data analysis and replication1. Here, using pooled next-generation sequencing of 507 genes implicated in the repair of DNA in 1,150 samples, an analytical strategy focussed on protein truncating variants (PTVs) and a large-scale sequencing case-control replication experiment in 13,642 individuals, we show that rare PTVs in the p53 inducible protein phosphatase PPM1D are associated with predisposition to breast cancer and to ovarian cancer. PPM1D PTV mutations were present in 25/7781 cases vs 1/5861 controls; P=1.12×10−5, which included 18 mutations in 6,912 individuals with breast cancer; P = 2.42×10−4 and 12 mutations in 1,121 individuals with ovarian cancer; P = 3.10×10−9. Notably, all the identified PPM1D PTVs were mosaic in lymphocyte DNA and clustered within a 370 bp region in the final exon of the gene, C-terminal to the phosphatase catalytic domain. Functional studies demonstrated that the mutations result in enhanced suppression of p53 in response to ionising radiation exposure, suggesting the mutant alleles encode hyperactive PPM1D isoforms. Thus, although the mutations cause premature protein truncation, they do not result in the simple loss-of-function typically associated with this class of variant, but instead likely have a gain-of-function effect. Our results have implications for the detection and management of breast and ovarian cancer risk. More generally, these data provide new insights into the role of rare and of mosaic genetic variants in common conditions, and the utility of sequencing in their identification.
doi:10.1038/nature11725
PMCID: PMC3759028  PMID: 23242139
3.  CAG repeat expansion in Huntington disease determines age at onset in a fully dominant fashion 
Lee, J.-M. | Ramos, E.M. | Lee, J.-H. | Gillis, T. | Mysore, J.S. | Hayden, M.R. | Warby, S.C. | Morrison, P. | Nance, M. | Ross, C.A. | Margolis, R.L. | Squitieri, F. | Orobello, S. | Di Donato, S. | Gomez-Tortosa, E. | Ayuso, C. | Suchowersky, O. | Trent, R.J.A. | McCusker, E. | Novelletto, A. | Frontali, M. | Jones, R. | Ashizawa, T. | Frank, S. | Saint-Hilaire, M.H. | Hersch, S.M. | Rosas, H.D. | Lucente, D. | Harrison, M.B. | Zanko, A. | Abramson, R.K. | Marder, K. | Sequeiros, J. | Paulsen, J.S. | Landwehrmeyer, G.B. | Myers, R.H. | MacDonald, M.E. | Gusella, J.F. | Durr, Alexandra | Rosenblatt, Adam | Frati, Luigi | Perlman, Susan | Conneally, Patrick M. | Klimek, Mary Lou | Diggin, Melissa | Hadzi, Tiffany | Duckett, Ayana | Ahmed, Anwar | Allen, Paul | Ames, David | Anderson, Christine | Anderson, Karla | Anderson, Karen | Andrews, Thomasin | Ashburner, John | Axelson, Eric | Aylward, Elizabeth | Barker, Roger A. | Barth, Katrin | Barton, Stacey | Baynes, Kathleen | Bea, Alexandra | Beall, Erik | Beg, Mirza Faisal | Beglinger, Leigh J. | Biglan, Kevin | Bjork, Kristine | Blanchard, Steve | Bockholt, Jeremy | Bommu, Sudharshan Reddy | Brossman, Bradley | Burrows, Maggie | Calhoun, Vince | Carlozzi, Noelle | Chesire, Amy | Chiu, Edmond | Chua, Phyllis | Connell, R.J. | Connor, Carmela | Corey-Bloom, Jody | Craufurd, David | Cross, Stephen | Cysique, Lucette | Santos, Rachelle Dar | Davis, Jennifer | Decolongon, Joji | DiPietro, Anna | Doucette, Nicholas | Downing, Nancy | Dudler, Ann | Dunn, Steve | Ecker, Daniel | Epping, Eric A. | Erickson, Diane | Erwin, Cheryl | Evans, Ken | Factor, Stewart A. | Farias, Sarah | Fatas, Marta | Fiedorowicz, Jess | Fullam, Ruth | Furtado, Sarah | Garde, Monica Bascunana | Gehl, Carissa | Geschwind, Michael D. | Goh, Anita | Gooblar, Jon | Goodman, Anna | Griffith, Jane | Groves, Mark | Guttman, Mark | Hamilton, Joanne | Harrington, Deborah | Harris, Greg | Heaton, Robert K. | Helmer, Karl | Henneberry, Machelle | Hershey, Tamara | Herwig, Kelly | Howard, Elizabeth | Hunter, Christine | Jankovic, Joseph | Johnson, Hans | Johnson, Arik | Jones, Kathy | Juhl, Andrew | Kim, Eun Young | Kimble, Mycah | King, Pamela | Klimek, Mary Lou | Klöppel, Stefan | Koenig, Katherine | Komiti, Angela | Kumar, Rajeev | Langbehn, Douglas | Leavitt, Blair | Leserman, Anne | Lim, Kelvin | Lipe, Hillary | Lowe, Mark | Magnotta, Vincent A. | Mallonee, William M. | Mans, Nicole | Marietta, Jacquie | Marshall, Frederick | Martin, Wayne | Mason, Sarah | Matheson, Kirsty | Matson, Wayne | Mazzoni, Pietro | McDowell, William | Miedzybrodzka, Zosia | Miller, Michael | Mills, James | Miracle, Dawn | Montross, Kelsey | Moore, David | Mori, Sasumu | Moser, David J. | Moskowitz, Carol | Newman, Emily | Nopoulos, Peg | Novak, Marianne | O'Rourke, Justin | Oakes, David | Ondo, William | Orth, Michael | Panegyres, Peter | Pease, Karen | Perlman, Susan | Perlmutter, Joel | Peterson, Asa | Phillips, Michael | Pierson, Ron | Potkin, Steve | Preston, Joy | Quaid, Kimberly | Radtke, Dawn | Rae, Daniela | Rao, Stephen | Raymond, Lynn | Reading, Sarah | Ready, Rebecca | Reece, Christine | Reilmann, Ralf | Reynolds, Norm | Richardson, Kylie | Rickards, Hugh | Ro, Eunyoe | Robinson, Robert | Rodnitzky, Robert | Rogers, Ben | Rosenblatt, Adam | Rosser, Elisabeth | Rosser, Anne | Price, Kathy | Price, Kathy | Ryan, Pat | Salmon, David | Samii, Ali | Schumacher, Jamy | Schumacher, Jessica | Sendon, Jose Luis Lópenz | Shear, Paula | Sheinberg, Alanna | Shpritz, Barnett | Siedlecki, Karen | Simpson, Sheila A. | Singer, Adam | Smith, Jim | Smith, Megan | Smith, Glenn | Snyder, Pete | Song, Allen | Sran, Satwinder | Stephan, Klaas | Stober, Janice | Sü?muth, Sigurd | Suter, Greg | Tabrizi, Sarah | Tempkin, Terry | Testa, Claudia | Thompson, Sean | Thomsen, Teri | Thumma, Kelli | Toga, Arthur | Trautmann, Sonja | Tremont, Geoff | Turner, Jessica | Uc, Ergun | Vaccarino, Anthony | van Duijn, Eric | Van Walsem, Marleen | Vik, Stacie | Vonsattel, Jean Paul | Vuletich, Elizabeth | Warner, Tom | Wasserman, Paula | Wassink, Thomas | Waterman, Elijah | Weaver, Kurt | Weir, David | Welsh, Claire | Werling-Witkoske, Chris | Wesson, Melissa | Westervelt, Holly | Weydt, Patrick | Wheelock, Vicki | Williams, Kent | Williams, Janet | Wodarski, Mary | Wojcieszek, Joanne | Wood, Jessica | Wood-Siverio, Cathy | Wu, Shuhua | Yastrubetskaya, Olga | de Yebenes, Justo Garcia | Zhao, Yong Qiang | Zimbelman, Janice | Zschiegner, Roland | Aaserud, Olaf | Abbruzzese, Giovanni | Andrews, Thomasin | Andrich, Jurgin | Antczak, Jakub | Arran, Natalie | Artiga, Maria J. Saiz | Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine | Banaszkiewicz, Krysztof | di Poggio, Monica Bandettini | Bandmann, Oliver | Barbera, Miguel A. | Barker, Roger A. | Barrero, Francisco | Barth, Katrin | Bas, Jordi | Beister, Antoine | Bentivoglio, Anna Rita | Bertini, Elisabetta | Biunno, Ida | Bjørgo, Kathrine | Bjørnevoll, Inga | Bohlen, Stefan | Bonelli, Raphael M. | Bos, Reineke | Bourne, Colin | Bradbury, Alyson | Brockie, Peter | Brown, Felicity | Bruno, Stefania | Bryl, Anna | Buck, Andrea | Burg, Sabrina | Burgunder, Jean-Marc | Burns, Peter | Burrows, Liz | Busquets, Nuria | Busse, Monica | Calopa, Matilde | Carruesco, Gemma T. | Casado, Ana Gonzalez | Catena, Judit López | Chu, Carol | Ciesielska, Anna | Clapton, Jackie | Clayton, Carole | Clenaghan, Catherine | Coelho, Miguel | Connemann, Julia | Craufurd, David | Crooks, Jenny | Cubillo, Patricia Trigo | Cubo, Esther | Curtis, Adrienne | De Michele, Giuseppe | De Nicola, A. | de Souza, Jenny | de Weert, A. Marit | de Yébenes, Justo Garcia | Dekker, M. | Descals, A. Martínez | Di Maio, Luigi | Di Pietro, Anna | Dipple, Heather | Dose, Matthias | Dumas, Eve M. | Dunnett, Stephen | Ecker, Daniel | Elifani, F. | Ellison-Rose, Lynda | Elorza, Marina D. | Eschenbach, Carolin | Evans, Carole | Fairtlough, Helen | Fannemel, Madelein | Fasano, Alfonso | Fenollar, Maria | Ferrandes, Giovanna | Ferreira, Jaoquim J. | Fillingham, Kay | Finisterra, Ana Maria | Fisher, K. | Fletcher, Amy | Foster, Jillian | Foustanos, Isabella | Frech, Fernando A. | Fullam, Robert | Fullham, Ruth | Gago, Miguel | García, RocioGarcía-Ramos | García, Socorro S. | Garrett, Carolina | Gellera, Cinzia | Gill, Paul | Ginestroni, Andrea | Golding, Charlotte | Goodman, Anna | Gørvell, Per | Grant, Janet | Griguoli, A. | Gross, Diana | Guedes, Leonor | BascuñanaGuerra, Monica | Guerra, Maria Rosalia | Guerrero, Rosa | Guia, Dolores B. | Guidubaldi, Arianna | Hallam, Caroline | Hamer, Stephanie | Hammer, Kathrin | Handley, Olivia J. | Harding, Alison | Hasholt, Lis | Hedge, Reikha | Heiberg, Arvid | Heinicke, Walburgis | Held, Christine | Hernanz, Laura Casas | Herranhof, Briggitte | Herrera, Carmen Durán | Hidding, Ute | Hiivola, Heli | Hill, Susan | Hjermind, Lena. E. | Hobson, Emma | Hoffmann, Rainer | Holl, Anna Hödl | Howard, Liz | Hunt, Sarah | Huson, Susan | Ialongo, Tamara | Idiago, Jesus Miguel R. | Illmann, Torsten | Jachinska, Katarzyna | Jacopini, Gioia | Jakobsen, Oda | Jamieson, Stuart | Jamrozik, Zygmunt | Janik, Piotr | Johns, Nicola | Jones, Lesley | Jones, Una | Jurgens, Caroline K. | Kaelin, Alain | Kalbarczyk, Anna | Kershaw, Ann | Khalil, Hanan | Kieni, Janina | Klimberg, Aneta | Koivisto, Susana P. | Koppers, Kerstin | Kosinski, Christoph Michael | Krawczyk, Malgorzata | Kremer, Berry | Krysa, Wioletta | Kwiecinski, Hubert | Lahiri, Nayana | Lambeck, Johann | Lange, Herwig | Laver, Fiona | Leenders, K.L. | Levey, Jamie | Leythaeuser, Gabriele | Lezius, Franziska | Llesoy, Joan Roig | Löhle, Matthias | López, Cristobal Diez-Aja | Lorenza, Fortuna | Loria, Giovanna | Magnet, Markus | Mandich, Paola | Marchese, Roberta | Marcinkowski, Jerzy | Mariotti, Caterina | Mariscal, Natividad | Markova, Ivana | Marquard, Ralf | Martikainen, Kirsti | Martínez, Isabel Haro | Martínez-Descals, Asuncion | Martino, T. | Mason, Sarah | McKenzie, Sue | Mechi, Claudia | Mendes, Tiago | Mestre, Tiago | Middleton, Julia | Milkereit, Eva | Miller, Joanne | Miller, Julie | Minster, Sara | Möller, Jens Carsten | Monza, Daniela | Morales, Blas | Moreau, Laura V. | Moreno, Jose L. López-Sendón | Münchau, Alexander | Murch, Ann | Nielsen, Jørgen E. | Niess, Anke | Nørremølle, Anne | Novak, Marianne | O'Donovan, Kristy | Orth, Michael | Otti, Daniela | Owen, Michael | Padieu, Helene | Paganini, Marco | Painold, Annamaria | Päivärinta, Markku | Partington-Jones, Lucy | Paterski, Laurent | Paterson, Nicole | Patino, Dawn | Patton, Michael | Peinemann, Alexander | Peppa, Nadia | Perea, Maria Fuensanta Noguera | Peterson, Maria | Piacentini, Silvia | Piano, Carla | Càrdenas, Regina Pons i | Prehn, Christian | Price, Kathleen | Probst, Daniela | Quarrell, Oliver | Quiroga, Purificacion Pin | Raab, Tina | Rakowicz, Maryla | Raman, Ashok | Raymond, Lucy | Reilmann, Ralf | Reinante, Gema | Reisinger, Karin | Retterstol, Lars | Ribaï, Pascale | Riballo, Antonio V. | Ribas, Guillermo G. | Richter, Sven | Rickards, Hugh | Rinaldi, Carlo | Rissling, Ida | Ritchie, Stuart | Rivera, Susana Vázquez | Robert, Misericordia Floriach | Roca, Elvira | Romano, Silvia | Romoli, Anna Maria | Roos, Raymond A.C. | Røren, Niini | Rose, Sarah | Rosser, Elisabeth | Rosser, Anne | Rossi, Fabiana | Rothery, Jean | Rudzinska, Monika | Ruíz, Pedro J. García | Ruíz, Belan Garzon | Russo, Cinzia Valeria | Ryglewicz, Danuta | Saft, Carston | Salvatore, Elena | Sánchez, Vicenta | Sando, Sigrid Botne | Šašinková, Pavla | Sass, Christian | Scheibl, Monika | Schiefer, Johannes | Schlangen, Christiane | Schmidt, Simone | Schöggl, Helmut | Schrenk, Caroline | Schüpbach, Michael | Schuierer, Michele | Sebastián, Ana Rojo | Selimbegovic-Turkovic, Amina | Sempolowicz, Justyna | Silva, Mark | Sitek, Emilia | Slawek, Jaroslaw | Snowden, Julie | Soleti, Francesco | Soliveri, Paola | Sollom, Andrea | Soltan, Witold | Sorbi, Sandro | Sorensen, Sven Asger | Spadaro, Maria | Städtler, Michael | Stamm, Christiane | Steiner, Tanja | Stokholm, Jette | Stokke, Bodil | Stopford, Cheryl | Storch, Alexander | Straßburger, Katrin | Stubbe, Lars | Sulek, Anna | Szczudlik, Andrzej | Tabrizi, Sarah | Taylor, Rachel | Terol, Santiago Duran-Sindreu | Thomas, Gareth | Thompson, Jennifer | Thomson, Aileen | Tidswell, Katherine | Torres, Maria M. Antequera | Toscano, Jean | Townhill, Jenny | Trautmann, Sonja | Tucci, Tecla | Tuuha, Katri | Uhrova, Tereza | Valadas, Anabela | van Hout, Monique S.E. | van Oostrom, J.C.H. | van Vugt, Jeroen P.P. | vanm, Walsem Marleen R. | Vandenberghe, Wim | Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine | Vergara, Mar Ruiz | Verstappen, C.C.P. | Verstraelen, Nichola | Viladrich, Celia Mareca | Villanueva, Clara | Wahlström, Jan | Warner, Thomas | Wehus, Raghild | Weindl, Adolf | Werner, Cornelius J. | Westmoreland, Leann | Weydt, Patrick | Wiedemann, Alexandra | Wild, Edward | Wild, Sue | Witjes-Ané, Marie-Noelle | Witkowski, Grzegorz | Wójcik, Magdalena | Wolz, Martin | Wolz, Annett | Wright, Jan | Yardumian, Pam | Yates, Shona | Yudina, Elizaveta | Zaremba, Jacek | Zaugg, Sabine W. | Zdzienicka, Elzbieta | Zielonka, Daniel | Zielonka, Euginiusz | Zinzi, Paola | Zittel, Simone | Zucker, Birgrit | Adams, John | Agarwal, Pinky | Antonijevic, Irina | Beck, Christopher | Chiu, Edmond | Churchyard, Andrew | Colcher, Amy | Corey-Bloom, Jody | Dorsey, Ray | Drazinic, Carolyn | Dubinsky, Richard | Duff, Kevin | Factor, Stewart | Foroud, Tatiana | Furtado, Sarah | Giuliano, Joe | Greenamyre, Timothy | Higgins, Don | Jankovic, Joseph | Jennings, Dana | Kang, Un Jung | Kostyk, Sandra | Kumar, Rajeev | Leavitt, Blair | LeDoux, Mark | Mallonee, William | Marshall, Frederick | Mohlo, Eric | Morgan, John | Oakes, David | Panegyres, Peter | Panisset, Michel | Perlman, Susan | Perlmutter, Joel | Quaid, Kimberly | Raymond, Lynn | Revilla, Fredy | Robertson, Suzanne | Robottom, Bradley | Sanchez-Ramos, Juan | Scott, Burton | Shannon, Kathleen | Shoulson, Ira | Singer, Carlos | Tabbal, Samer | Testa, Claudia | van, Kammen Dan | Vetter, Louise | Walker, Francis | Warner, John | Weiner, illiam | Wheelock, Vicki | Yastrubetskaya, Olga | Barton, Stacey | Broyles, Janice | Clouse, Ronda | Coleman, Allison | Davis, Robert | Decolongon, Joji | DeLaRosa, Jeanene | Deuel, Lisa | Dietrich, Susan | Dubinsky, Hilary | Eaton, Ken | Erickson, Diane | Fitzpatrick, Mary Jane | Frucht, Steven | Gartner, Maureen | Goldstein, Jody | Griffith, Jane | Hickey, Charlyne | Hunt, Victoria | Jaglin, Jeana | Klimek, Mary Lou | Lindsay, Pat | Louis, Elan | Loy, Clemet | Lucarelli, Nancy | Malarick, Keith | Martin, Amanda | McInnis, Robert | Moskowitz, Carol | Muratori, Lisa | Nucifora, Frederick | O'Neill, Christine | Palao, Alicia | Peavy, Guerry | Quesada, Monica | Schmidt, Amy | Segro, Vicki | Sperin, Elaine | Suter, Greg | Tanev, Kalo | Tempkin, Teresa | Thiede, Curtis | Wasserman, Paula | Welsh, Claire | Wesson, Melissa | Zauber, Elizabeth
Neurology  2012;78(10):690-695.
Objective:
Age at onset of diagnostic motor manifestations in Huntington disease (HD) is strongly correlated with an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat. The length of the normal CAG repeat allele has been reported also to influence age at onset, in interaction with the expanded allele. Due to profound implications for disease mechanism and modification, we tested whether the normal allele, interaction between the expanded and normal alleles, or presence of a second expanded allele affects age at onset of HD motor signs.
Methods:
We modeled natural log-transformed age at onset as a function of CAG repeat lengths of expanded and normal alleles and their interaction by linear regression.
Results:
An apparently significant effect of interaction on age at motor onset among 4,068 subjects was dependent on a single outlier data point. A rigorous statistical analysis with a well-behaved dataset that conformed to the fundamental assumptions of linear regression (e.g., constant variance and normally distributed error) revealed significance only for the expanded CAG repeat, with no effect of the normal CAG repeat. Ten subjects with 2 expanded alleles showed an age at motor onset consistent with the length of the larger expanded allele.
Conclusions:
Normal allele CAG length, interaction between expanded and normal alleles, and presence of a second expanded allele do not influence age at onset of motor manifestations, indicating that the rate of HD pathogenesis leading to motor diagnosis is determined by a completely dominant action of the longest expanded allele and as yet unidentified genetic or environmental factors. Neurology® 2012;78:690–695
doi:10.1212/WNL.0b013e318249f683
PMCID: PMC3306163  PMID: 22323755
4.  Gene–gene interactions in breast cancer susceptibility 
Human Molecular Genetics  2011;21(4):958-962.
There have been few definitive examples of gene–gene interactions in humans. Through mutational analyses in 7325 individuals, we report four interactions (defined as departures from a multiplicative model) between mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility genes ATM and CHEK2 with BRCA1 and BRCA2 (case-only interaction between ATM and BRCA1/BRCA2 combined, P = 5.9 × 10–4; ATM and BRCA1, P= 0.01; ATM and BRCA2, P= 0.02; CHEK2 and BRCA1/BRCA2 combined, P = 2.1 × 10−4; CHEK2 and BRCA1, P= 0.01; CHEK2 and BRCA2, P= 0.01). The interactions are such that the resultant risk of breast cancer is lower than the multiplicative product of the constituent risks, and plausibly reflect the functional relationships of the encoded proteins in DNA repair. These findings have important implications for models of disease predisposition and clinical translation.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddr525
PMCID: PMC4125627  PMID: 22072393
5.  3D MRI Analysis of the Lower Legs of Treated Idiopathic Congenital Talipes Equinovarus (Clubfoot) 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(1):e54100.
Background
Idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV) is the commonest form of clubfoot. Its exact cause is unknown, although it is related to limb development. The aim of this study was to quantify the anatomy of the muscle, subcutaneous fat, tibia, fibula and arteries in the lower legs of teenagers and young adults with CTEV using 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and thus to investigate the anatomical differences between CTEV participants and controls.
Methodology/Principal Findings
The lower legs of six CTEV (2 bilateral, 4 unilateral) and five control young adults (age 12–28) were imaged using a 3T MRI Philips scanner. 5 of the CTEV participants had undergone soft-tissue and capsular release surgery. 3D T1-weighted and 3D magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images were acquired. Segmentation software was used for volumetric, anatomical and image analysis. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests were performed. The volumes of the lower affected leg, muscle, tibia and fibula in unilateral CTEV participants were consistently smaller compared to their contralateral unaffected leg, this was most pronounced in muscle. The proportion of muscle in affected CTEV legs was significantly reduced compared with control and unaffected CTEV legs, whilst proportion of muscular fat increased. No spatial abnormalities in the location or branching of arteries were detected, but hypoplastic anomalies were observed.
Conclusions/Significance
Combining 3D MRI and MRA is effective for quantitatively characterizing CTEV anatomy. Reduction in leg muscle volume appears to be a sensitive marker. Since 5/6 CTEV cases had soft-tissue surgery, further work is required to confirm that the treatment did not affect the MRI features observed. We propose that the proportion of muscle and intra-muscular fat within the lower leg could provide a valuable addition to current clinical CTEV classification. These measures could be useful for clinical care and guiding treatment pathways, as well as treatment research and clinical audit.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0054100
PMCID: PMC3559654  PMID: 23382871
6.  Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers 
Antoniou, Antonis C | Kartsonaki, Christiana | Sinilnikova, Olga M. | Soucy, Penny | McGuffog, Lesley | Healey, Sue | Lee, Andrew | Peterlongo, Paolo | Manoukian, Siranoush | Peissel, Bernard | Zaffaroni, Daniela | Cattaneo, Elisa | Barile, Monica | Pensotti, Valeria | Pasini, Barbara | Dolcetti, Riccardo | Giannini, Giuseppe | Laura Putignano, Anna | Varesco, Liliana | Radice, Paolo | Mai, Phuong L. | Greene, Mark H. | Andrulis, Irene L. | Glendon, Gord | Ozcelik, Hilmi | Thomassen, Mads | Gerdes, Anne-Marie | Kruse, Torben A. | Birk Jensen, Uffe | Crüger, Dorthe G. | Caligo, Maria A. | Laitman, Yael | Milgrom, Roni | Kaufman, Bella | Paluch-Shimon, Shani | Friedman, Eitan | Loman, Niklas | Harbst, Katja | Lindblom, Annika | Arver, Brita | Ehrencrona, Hans | Melin, Beatrice | Nathanson, Katherine L. | Domchek, Susan M. | Rebbeck, Timothy | Jakubowska, Ania | Lubinski, Jan | Gronwald, Jacek | Huzarski, Tomasz | Byrski, Tomasz | Cybulski, Cezary | Gorski, Bohdan | Osorio, Ana | Ramón y Cajal, Teresa | Fostira, Florentia | Andrés, Raquel | Benitez, Javier | Hamann, Ute | Hogervorst, Frans B. | Rookus, Matti A. | Hooning, Maartje J. | Nelen, Marcel R. | van der Luijt, Rob B. | van Os, Theo A.M. | van Asperen, Christi J. | Devilee, Peter | Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J. | Gómez Garcia, Encarna B. | Peock, Susan | Cook, Margaret | Frost, Debra | Platte, Radka | Leyland, Jean | Gareth Evans, D. | Lalloo, Fiona | Eeles, Ros | Izatt, Louise | Adlard, Julian | Davidson, Rosemarie | Eccles, Diana | Ong, Kai-ren | Cook, Jackie | Douglas, Fiona | Paterson, Joan | John Kennedy, M. | Miedzybrodzka, Zosia | Godwin, Andrew | Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique | Buecher, Bruno | Belotti, Muriel | Tirapo, Carole | Mazoyer, Sylvie | Barjhoux, Laure | Lasset, Christine | Leroux, Dominique | Faivre, Laurence | Bronner, Myriam | Prieur, Fabienne | Nogues, Catherine | Rouleau, Etienne | Pujol, Pascal | Coupier, Isabelle | Frénay, Marc | Hopper, John L. | Daly, Mary B. | Terry, Mary B. | John, Esther M. | Buys, Saundra S. | Yassin, Yosuf | Miron, Alexander | Goldgar, David | Singer, Christian F. | Tea, Muy-Kheng | Pfeiler, Georg | Catharina Dressler, Anne | Hansen, Thomas v.O. | Jønson, Lars | Ejlertsen, Bent | Bjork Barkardottir, Rosa | Kirchhoff, Tomas | Offit, Kenneth | Piedmonte, Marion | Rodriguez, Gustavo | Small, Laurie | Boggess, John | Blank, Stephanie | Basil, Jack | Azodi, Masoud | Ewart Toland, Amanda | Montagna, Marco | Tognazzo, Silvia | Agata, Simona | Imyanitov, Evgeny | Janavicius, Ramunas | Lazaro, Conxi | Blanco, Ignacio | Pharoah, Paul D.P. | Sucheston, Lara | Karlan, Beth Y. | Walsh, Christine S. | Olah, Edith | Bozsik, Aniko | Teo, Soo-Hwang | Seldon, Joyce L. | Beattie, Mary S. | van Rensburg, Elizabeth J. | Sluiter, Michelle D. | Diez, Orland | Schmutzler, Rita K. | Wappenschmidt, Barbara | Engel, Christoph | Meindl, Alfons | Ruehl, Ina | Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda | Kast, Karin | Deissler, Helmut | Niederacher, Dieter | Arnold, Norbert | Gadzicki, Dorothea | Schönbuchner, Ines | Caldes, Trinidad | de la Hoya, Miguel | Nevanlinna, Heli | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Dumont, Martine | Chiquette, Jocelyne | Tischkowitz, Marc | Chen, Xiaoqing | Beesley, Jonathan | Spurdle, Amanda B. | Neuhausen, Susan L. | Chun Ding, Yuan | Fredericksen, Zachary | Wang, Xianshu | Pankratz, Vernon S. | Couch, Fergus | Simard, Jacques | Easton, Douglas F. | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia
Human Molecular Genetics  2011;20(16):3304-3321.
Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs11249433 at 1p11.2 and rs999737 in RAD51L1 at 14q24.1. Although previously identified breast cancer susceptibility variants have been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, the involvement of these SNPs to breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers is currently unknown. To address this, we genotyped these SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from 42 studies from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. In the analysis of 14 123 BRCA1 and 8053 BRCA2 mutation carriers of European ancestry, the 6q25.1 SNPs (r2 = 0.14) were independently associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11–1.23, P-trend = 4.5 × 10−9 for rs2046210; HR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.18–1.40, P-trend = 1.3 × 10−8 for rs9397435], but only rs9397435 was associated with the risk for BRCA2 carriers (HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01–1.28, P-trend = 0.031). SNP rs11249433 (1p11.2) was associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.02–1.17, P-trend = 0.015), but was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.92–1.02, P-trend = 0.20). SNP rs999737 (RAD51L1) was not associated with breast cancer risk for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers (P-trend = 0.27 and 0.30, respectively). The identification of SNPs at 6q25.1 associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers will lead to a better understanding of the biology of tumour development in these women.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddr226
PMCID: PMC3652640  PMID: 21593217
7.  Tissue specific characterisation of Lim-kinase 1 expression during mouse embryogenesis 
Gene expression patterns : GEP  2010;11(3-4):221-232.
The Lim-kinase (LIMK) proteins are important for the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, in particular the control of actin nucleation and depolymerisation via regulation of cofilin, and hence may control a large number of processes during development, including cell tensegrity, migration, cell cycling, and axon guidance. LIMK1/LIMK2 knockouts disrupt spinal cord morphogenesis and synapse formation but other tissues and developmental processes that require LIMK are yet to be fully determined. To identify tissues and cell-types that may require LIMK, we characterised the pattern of LIMK1 protein during mouse embryogenesis. We showed that LIMK1 displays an expression pattern that is temporally dynamic and tissue-specific. In several tissues LIMK1 is detected in cell-types that also express Wilms’ tumour protein 1 and that undergo transitions between epithelial and mesenchymal states, including the pleura, epicardium, kidney nephrons, and gonads. LIMK1 was also found in a subset of cells in the dorsal retina, and in mesenchymal cells surrounding the peripheral nerves. This detailed study of the spatial and temporal expression of LIMK1 shows that LIMK1 expression is more dynamic than previously reported, in particular at sites of tissue–tissue interactions guiding multiple developmental processes.
doi:10.1016/j.gep.2010.12.003
PMCID: PMC3407955  PMID: 21167960
Limk; Kidney; Heart; Epithelia-to-mesenchyme transition; Mesenchyme-to-epithelia transition; Eye; Testes
8.  Micro-magnetic resonance imaging and embryological analysis of wild-type and pma mutant mice with clubfoot 
Journal of Anatomy  2009;216(1):108-120.
Gross similarities between the external appearance of the hind limbs of the peroneal muscle atrophy (pma) mouse mutant and congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV), a human disorder historically referred to as ‘clubfoot’, suggested that this mutant could be a useful model. We used micro-magnetic resonance imaging to visualize the detailed anatomy of the hind limb defect in mutant pma mice and performed 3D comparisons between mutant and wild-type hind limbs. We found that the pma foot demonstrates supination (i.e. adduction and inversion of the mid foot and fore foot together with plantar flexion of the ankle and toes) and that the tibiale and distal tarsals display 3D abnormalities in positioning. The size and shape of the tibia, fibula, tarsal and metatarsal bones are similar to the wild-type. Hypoplasia of the muscles in the antero-lateral (peroneal) compartment was also demonstrated. The resemblance of these features to those seen in CTEV suggests that the pma mouse is a possibly useful model for the human condition. To understand how the observed deformities in the pma mouse hind foot arise during embryonic development, we followed the process of foot rotation in both wild-type and pma mutant mice. Rotation of the hind foot in mouse embryos of wild-type strains (CD-1 and C57/Black) occurs from embryonic day 14.5 onwards with rotation in C57/Black taking longer. In embryos from both strains, rotation of the right hind foot more commonly precedes rotation of the left. In pma mutants, the initiation of rotation is often delayed and rotation is slower and does not reach completion. If the usefulness of the pma mutant as a model is confirmed, then these findings on pma mouse embryos, when extrapolated to humans, would support a long-standing hypothesis that CTEV is due to the failure of completion of the normal process of rotation and angulation, historically known as the ‘arrested development hypothesis’.
doi:10.1111/j.1469-7580.2009.01163.x
PMCID: PMC2807979  PMID: 19900178
anatomy; clubfoot; congenital talipes equinovarus; embryo; hind limb; limb development; magnetic resonance imaging; micro-magnetic resonance imaging; mouse; musculoskeletal; peroneal muscle atrophy
9.  Is There Evidence for Aetiologically Distinct Subgroups of Idiopathic Congenital Talipes Equinovarus? A Case-Only Study and Pedigree Analysis 
PLoS ONE  2011;6(4):e17895.
Background
Idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV) is a common developmental foot disorder, the aetiology of which remains largely unknown. Some aspects of the epidemiology suggest the possibility of aetiologically distinct subgroups. Previous studies consider CTEV as a homogenous entity which may conceal risk factors in particular subgroups. We investigate evidence for aetiologically distinct subgroups of CTEV.
Methods
Parents of 785 probands completed a postal questionnaire. Family pedigrees were compiled by telephone. Case-only analysis was used to investigate interactions between risk factors and sex of the proband, CTEV laterality and CTEV family history.
Results
The male∶female ratio was 2.3∶1, 58% of probands were affected bilaterally and 11% had a first-second degree family history. There were modest interactions between family history and twin births (multivariate case - only odds ratio [ORca] = 3.87, 95%CI 1.19–12.62) and family history and maternal use of folic acid supplements in early pregnancy (ORca = 0.62, 95%CI 0.38–1.01); and between sex of the proband and maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy (female, positive history and alcohol consumed: ORca = 0.33, 95%CI 0.12–0.89). Previous reports of an interaction between maternal smoking and family history were not confirmed. Relatives of female probands were affected more often than relatives of male probands.
Conclusions
These results provide tentative evidence for aetiologically distinct CTEV subgroups. They support the ‘Carter effect’, suggesting CTEV develops though a multifactorial threshold model with females requiring a higher risk factor ‘load’, and suggest areas where future aetiological investigation might focus. Large multi-centre studies are needed to further advance understanding of this common condition.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0017895
PMCID: PMC3080359  PMID: 21533128
10.  New mutations, genotype phenotype studies and manifesting carriers in giant axonal neuropathy 
Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN; MIM 256850) is a severe childhood onset autosomal recessive sensorimotor neuropathy affecting both the peripheral nerves and the central nervous system. Bomont and colleagues identified a novel ubiquitously expressed gene they named Gigaxonin on chromosome 16q24 as the cause of GAN in a number of families. We analysed five families with GAN for mutations in the Gigaxonin gene and mutations were found in four families; three families had homozygous mutations, one had two compound heterozygous mutations and one family had no mutation identified. All families had the typical clinical features, kinky hair and nerve biopsy. We report some unusual clinical features associated with GAN and Gigaxonin mutations as well as confirm the heterogeneity in GAN and the identification of two families with manifesting carriers.
doi:10.1136/jnnp.2007.118968
PMCID: PMC2117591  PMID: 17578852
11.  Micro-magnetic resonance imaging and embryological analysis of wild-type and pma mutant mice with clubfoot 
Journal of Anatomy  2009;216(1):108-120.
Gross similarities between the external appearance of the hind limbs of the peroneal muscle atrophy (pma) mouse mutant and congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV), a human disorder historically referred to as ‘clubfoot’, suggested that this mutant could be a useful model. We used micro-magnetic resonance imaging to visualize the detailed anatomy of the hind limb defect in mutant pma mice and performed 3D comparisons between mutant and wild-type hind limbs. We found that the pma foot demonstrates supination (i.e. adduction and inversion of the mid foot and fore foot together with plantar flexion of the ankle and toes) and that the tibiale and distal tarsals display 3D abnormalities in positioning. The size and shape of the tibia, fibula, tarsal and metatarsal bones are similar to the wild-type. Hypoplasia of the muscles in the antero-lateral (peroneal) compartment was also demonstrated. The resemblance of these features to those seen in CTEV suggests that the pma mouse is a possibly useful model for the human condition. To understand how the observed deformities in the pma mouse hind foot arise during embryonic development, we followed the process of foot rotation in both wild-type and pma mutant mice. Rotation of the hind foot in mouse embryos of wild-type strains (CD-1 and C57/Black) occurs from embryonic day 14.5 onwards with rotation in C57/Black taking longer. In embryos from both strains, rotation of the right hind foot more commonly precedes rotation of the left. In pma mutants, the initiation of rotation is often delayed and rotation is slower and does not reach completion. If the usefulness of the pma mutant as a model is confirmed, then these findings on pma mouse embryos, when extrapolated to humans, would support a long-standing hypothesis that CTEV is due to the failure of completion of the normal process of rotation and angulation, historically known as the ‘arrested development hypothesis’.
doi:10.1111/j.1469-7580.2009.01163.x
PMCID: PMC2807979  PMID: 19900178
anatomy; clubfoot; congenital talipes equinovarus; embryo; hind limb; limb development; magnetic resonance imaging; micro-magnetic resonance imaging; mouse; musculoskeletal; peroneal muscle atrophy
12.  Variation in WNT7A is unlikely to be a cause of familial Congenital Talipes Equinovarus 
BMC Medical Genetics  2008;9:50.
Background
Genetic factors make an important contribution to the aetiology of congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV), the most common developmental disorder of the lower limb. WNT7A was suggested as a candidate gene for CTEV on the basis of a genome-wide scan for linkage in a large multi-case family. WNT7A is a plausible candidate gene for CTEV as it provides a signal for pattern formation during limb development, and mutation in WNT7A has been reported in a number of limb malformation syndromes.
Methods
We investigated the role of WNT7A using a family-based linkage approach in our large series of European multi-case CTEV families. Three microsatellite markers were used, of which one (D3S2385) is intragenic, and the other two (D3S2403, D3S1252) are 700 kb 5' to the start and 20 kb from the 3' end of the gene, respectively. Ninety-one CTEV families, comprising 476 individuals of whom 211 were affected, were genotyped. LOD scores using recessive and incomplete-dominant inheritance models, and non-parametric linkage scores, excluded linkage.
Results
No significant evidence for linkage was observed using either parametric or non-parametric models. LOD scores for the parametric models remained strongly negative in the regions between the markers, and in the 0.5 cM intervals outside the marker map. No significant lod scores were obtained when the data were analysed allowing for heterogeneity.
Conclusion
Our evidence suggests that the WNT7A gene is unlikely to be a major contributor to the aetiology of familial CTEV.
doi:10.1186/1471-2350-9-50
PMCID: PMC2438341  PMID: 18538017

Results 1-12 (12)