PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-3 (3)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) for Treatment among African-Americans: A Multivariate Analysis 
Background
Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is substantial among African-Americans; however, research on characteristics of African-Americans who use of CAM to treat specific conditions is scarce.
Objective
To determine what predisposing, enabling, need, and disease state factors are related to CAM use for treatment among a nationally representative sample of African-Americans.
Methods
A cross-sectional study design was employed using the 2002 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). A nationwide representative sample of adult (≥ 18 years) African-Americans who used CAM in the past 12 months (n= 16,113,651 weighted; n=2,952 unweighted) were included. The Andersen Healthcare Utilization Model served the framework with CAM use for treatment as the main outcome measure. Independent variables included: predisposing (e.g., age, gender, education), enabling (e.g., income, employment, access to care); need (e.g., health status, physician visits, prescription medication use); and disease state (i.e., most prevalent conditions among African-Americans) factors. Multivariate logistic regression was used to address the study objective.
Results
Approximately one in five (20.2%) CAM past 12 month users used CAM to treat a specific condition. Ten of the 15 CAM modalities were used primarily for treatment by African-Americans. CAM for treatment was significantly (p<0.05) associated with the following factors: graduate education, smaller family size, higher income, region (northeast, midwest, west more likely than south), depression/anxiety, more physician visits, less likely to engage in preventive care, more frequent exercise behavior, more activities of daily living (ADL) limitations, and neck pain.
Conclusions
Twenty percent of African-Americans who used CAM in the past year were treating a specific condition. Alternative medical systems, manipulative and body-based therapies, as well as folk medicine, prayer, biofeedback, and energy/Reiki were used most often. Health care professionals should routinely ask patients about CAM use, but when encountering African-Americans, there may be a number of factors that may serve as cues for further inquiry.
doi:10.1016/j.sapharm.2009.08.001
PMCID: PMC2933406  PMID: 20813333
African-American; Andersen Healthcare Utilization Model; CAM; CAM for treatment complementary/alternative medicine
2.  Effectiveness of Compounded Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy: An Observational Cohort Study 
BMC Women's Health  2011;11:27.
Background
Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy (BHRT) is believed it to be a safer and equally effective alternative to Conventional Hormone Therapy for the relief of menopausal symptoms; however, data are needed to support these claims. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of compounded BHRT provided in six community pharmacies.
Methods
This was an observational cohort study of women between the ages of 18-89 who received a compounded BHRT product from January 1, 2003 to April 30, 2010 in six community pharmacies. Data included patient demographics, comorbidities, therapeutic outcomes, and hormone therapies. Women self-rated menopausal symptoms as absent, mild, moderate, or severe. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the patient population, BHRT use, and adverse events. Patient symptom severity was compared at baseline and 3 to 6 months follow-up using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test.
Results
Women (n = 296) receiving BHRT at Oakdell Pharmacy had a mean (standard deviation) age of 52 (9) years. The most common BHRT dosage forms utilized were topical (71%) and oral (43%). Compounded BHRT regimens were generally initiated at low doses regardless of route. Women experienced a 25% decrease in emotional lability (p < 0.01), a 25% decrease in irritability (p < 0.01), and a 22% reduction in anxiety (p = 0.01) within 3 to 6 months. These women also experienced a 14% reduction in night sweats (p = 0.09) and a 6% reduction in hot flashes (p = 0.50).
Conclusions
This study demonstrates that compounded BHRT improves mood symptoms. Larger studies are needed to examine the impact on vasomotor symptoms, myocardial infarction and breast cancer.
doi:10.1186/1472-6874-11-27
PMCID: PMC3131235  PMID: 21651797
3.  Interprofessional Education in Six US Colleges of Pharmacy 
Objective
To present and describe interprofessional education (IPE) in 6 US colleges of pharmacy including benefits, barriers, and strategies for implementation.
Methods
A focus group with campus faculty IPE leaders and administrators was conducted at each of the 6 colleges. External facilitators used a structured script with open-ended questions to guide each session. A qualitative approach was used and content analysis of transcripts was conducted.
Results
On a 10-point scale, mean participant interest in IPE was 8.8 ± 1.7. Incentives included enhanced student education, instructional economies of scale, improved communication among disciplines, and promotion of teamwork to improve quality of care. Curricular logistics, limited resources, lack of conceptual support, and cultural issues were the major barriers to IPE. Institutions were at various stages of IPE implementation. Participants emphasized that full institutional support was critical in maintaining IPE programs.
Conclusion
Interest in IPE was high and opportunities were numerous as described by faculty members at the institutions; however, numerous challenges to implementation were identified.
PMCID: PMC2720357  PMID: 19657494
interprofessional education; focus group; pharmacy

Results 1-3 (3)