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1.  Systemic arteriosclerosis and eating behavior in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients with visceral fat accumulation 
Background
Visceral fat accumulation is a major etiological factor in the progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. We described previously visceral fat accumulation and multiple cardiovascular risk factors in a considerable number of Japanese non-obese subjects (BMI <25 kg/m2). Here, we investigated differences in systemic arteriosclerosis, serum adiponectin concentration, and eating behavior in type 2 diabetic patients with and without visceral fat accumulation.
Methods
The study subjects were 75 Japanese type 2 diabetes mellitus (age: 64.8 ± 11.5 years, mean ± SD). Visceral fat accumulation represented an estimated visceral fat area of 100 cm2 using the bioelectrical impedance analysis method. Subjects were divided into two groups; with (n = 53) and without (n = 22) visceral fat accumulation. Systemic arteriosclerosis was scored for four arteries by ultrasonography. Eating behavior was assessed based on The Guideline for Obesity questionnaire issued by the Japan Society for the Study of Obesity.
Results
The visceral fat accumulation (+) group showed significantly higher systemic vascular scores and significantly lower serum adiponectin levels than the visceral fat accumulation (−) group. With respect to the eating behavior questionnaire items, (+) patients showed higher values for the total score and many of the major sub-scores than (−) patients.
Conclusions
Type 2 diabetic patients with visceral fat accumulation showed 1) progression of systemic arteriosclerosis, 2) low serum adiponectin levels, and 3) differences in eating behavior, compared to those without visceral fat accumulation. Taken together, the findings highlight the importance of evaluating visceral fat area in type 2 diabetic patients. Furthermore, those with visceral fat accumulation might need to undergo more intensive screening for systemic arteriosclerosis and consider modifying their eating behaviors.
doi:10.1186/s12933-015-0174-7
PMCID: PMC4301666  PMID: 25592402
Type 2 diabetes; Visceral fat accumulation; Adiponectin; Systemic arteriosclerosis; Vascular ultrasonography; Eating behavior
2.  Adipose Hypothermia in Obesity and Its Association with Period Homolog 1, Insulin Sensitivity, and Inflammation in Fat 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(11):e112813.
Visceral fat adiposity plays an important role in the development of metabolic syndrome. We reported previously the impact of human visceral fat adiposity on gene expression profile of peripheral blood cells. Genes related to circadian rhythm were highly associated with visceral fat area and period homolog 1 (PER1) showed the most significant negative correlation with visceral fat area. However, regulation of adipose Per1 remains poorly understood. The present study was designed to understand the regulation of Per1 in adipose tissues. Adipose Per1 mRNA levels of ob/ob mice were markedly low at 25 and 35 weeks of age. The levels of other core clock genes of white adipose tissues were also low in ob/ob mice at 25 and 35 weeks of age. Per1 mRNA was mainly expressed in the mature adipocyte fraction (MAF) and it was significantly low in MAF of ob/ob mice. To examine the possible mechanisms, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with H2O2, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), S100A8, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However, no significant changes in Per1 mRNA level were observed by these agents. Exposure of cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes to low temperature (33°C) decreased Per1 and catalase, and increased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (Mcp-1) mRNA levels. Hypothermia also worsened insulin-mediated Akt phosphorylation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Finally, telemetric analysis showed low temperature of adipose tissues in ob/ob mice. In obesity, adipose hypothermia seems to accelerate adipocyte dysfunction.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0112813
PMCID: PMC4232416  PMID: 25397888
3.  Long-term impact of liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue, on body weight and glycemic control in Japanese type 2 diabetes: an observational study 
Background
Liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue, has been shown to possess pleiotropic effects including body weight reduction. However, long-term effect of liraglutide on body weight and glycemic control has not been elucidated in Japanese type 2 diabetes (T2D) subjects. Present study investigates whether liraglutide treatment maintains the body weight-decreasing and glucose-lowering effects for 2 years in Japanese T2D subjects.
Methods
The enrolled subjects were 86 T2D patients [age; 59.8 ± 12.8 years, duration of diabetes; 15.8 ± 9.5 years, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c); 8.5 ± 1.5%, body mass index (BMI); 27.3 ± 5.4 kg/m2 (15.8 - 46.5 kg/m2), mean ± SD]. Among 86 subjects, liraglutide was introduced in 25 inpatients and 61 outpatients, and 46 subjects were followed for 2 years. Clinical parameters were measured at baseline and 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 months after liraglutide introduction. The increase in liraglutide dosage and the additional usage of glucose-lowering agents depended on each attending physician.
Results
At 1 year after liraglutide introduction, 69 patients (80.2%) decreased body weight and 58 patients (67.4%) improved glycemic control. Body mass index (BMI) was changed 27.3 ± 5.4 kg/m2 to 25.9 ± 4.8 kg/m2 and percent reduction of body weight was significant and maintained over 4% at 2 years after liraglutide introduction. HbA1c was significantly decreased from 8.5 ± 1.5% to 7.7 ± 1.2% for 2 years. Liraglutide treatment tended to ameliorate lipid profile and hepatic enzymes. Stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that baseline BMI and previous insulin dose were positively associated with body weight reduction and baseline HbA1c was positively associated with reduction of HbA1c at 2 years after liraglutide introduction.
Conclusions
Long-term liraglutide treatment effectively maintained the reduction of body weight and the fair glycemic control, and also improved lipid profile and liver enzymes in Japanese T2D subjects.
doi:10.1186/1758-5996-6-95
PMCID: PMC4167135  PMID: 25237400
Liraglutide; Glucagon-like peptide-1; Obesity; Diabetes; Metabolic syndrome; Eating behavior
4.  A pilot three-month sitagliptin treatment increases serum adiponectin level in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus- a randomized controlled trial START-J study 
Background
The dipeptidyl-peptidase-IV (DPP-4) inhibitors, including sitagliptin, are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Adiponectin, an adipocyte-derived circulating protein, has anti-atherosclerotic and anti-diabetic properties and is effectively elevated in bloodstream by thiazolidinediones, an insulin sensitizer. However, the effect of sitagliptin treatment on serum adiponectin level in T2DM has not fully elucidated in Japanese T2DM patients. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of sitagliptin treatment on serum adiponectin levels in T2DM subjects.
Methods
Twenty-six consecutive Japanese T2DM outpatients were recruited between April 2011 and March 2013, and randomized into the control (conventional treatment, n = 10) group and sitagliptin treatment group (n = 16). Serum adiponectin was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
Results
Indices of glycemic control, such as hemoglobin A1c, glycated albumin, and 1.5-anhydro-D-glucitol, were significantly improved after the three-month treatment in both the control and sitagliptin groups. Serum adiponectin level was significantly increased in sitagliptin group from 6.7 ± 0.8 to 7.4 ± 1.0 μg/mL without change of body mass index (p = 0.034), while serum adiponectin level was not altered in the control group (p = 0.601).
Conclusion
In Japanese T2DM patients, serum adiponectin level was elevated by three-month treatment with sitagliptin without change of body weight.
Trial registration
UMIN000004721
doi:10.1186/1475-2840-13-96
PMCID: PMC4049487  PMID: 24884787
Sitagliptin; Adiponectin; DPP4 inhibitor; Inctrein; Diabetes; Oxidative stress
5.  Ultrastructural Localization of Adiponectin protein in Vasculature of Normal and Atherosclerotic mice 
Scientific Reports  2014;4:4895.
Adiponectin, adipose-specific secretory protein, abundantly circulates in bloodstream and its concentration is around 1000-fold higher than that of other cytokines and hormones. Hypoadiponectinemia is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. There is little or no information on ultrastructural localization of adiponectin in the vasculature. Herein we investigated the localization of vascular adiponectin in the aorta using the immunoelectron microscopic technique. In wild-type (WT) mice, adiponectin was mainly detected on the luminal surface membrane of endothelial cells (ECs) and also found intracellularly in the endocytic vesicles of ECs. In the atherosclerotic lesions of apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE-KO) mice, adiponectin was detected in ECs, on the cell surface membrane of synthetic smooth muscle cells, and on the surface of monocytes adherent to ECs. Changes in adiponectin localization within the wall of the aorta may provide novel insight into the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.
doi:10.1038/srep04895
PMCID: PMC4013939  PMID: 24809933
6.  Possible Involvement of Opa-Interacting Protein 5 in Adipose Proliferation and Obesity 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(2):e87661.
Obesity is an epidemic matter increasing risk for cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes. We recently examined the association between visceral fat adiposity and gene expression profile of peripheral blood cells in human subjects. In a series of studies, Opa (Neisseria gonorrhoeae opacity-associated)-interacting protein 5 (OIP5) was nominated as a molecule of unknown function in adipocytes and thus the present study was performed to investigate the role of OIP5 in obesity. Adenovirus overexpressing Oip5 (Ad-Oip5) was generated and infected to 3T3-L1 cells stably expressing Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR-3T3-L1) and to mouse subcutaneous fat. For a knockdown experiment, siRNA against Oip5 (Oip5-siRNA) was introduced into 3T3-L1 cells. Proliferation of adipose cells was measured by BrdU uptake, EdU-staining, and cell count. Significant increase of Oip5 mRNA level was observed in obese white adipose tissues and such increase was detected in both mature adipocytes fraction and stromal vascular cell fraction. Ad-Oip5-infected CAR-3T3-L1 preadipocytes and adipocytes proliferated rapidly, while a significant reduction of proliferation was observed in Oip5-siRNA-introduced 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Fat weight and number of adipocytes were significantly increased in Ad-Oip5-administered fat tissues. Oip5 promotes proliferation of pre- and mature-adipocytes and contributes adipose hyperplasia. Increase of Oip5 may associate with development of obesity.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0087661
PMCID: PMC3916335  PMID: 24516558
7.  A Novel Role for Adipose Ephrin-B1 in Inflammatory Response 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(10):e76199.
Aims
Ephrin-B1 (EfnB1) was selected among genes of unknown function in adipocytes or adipose tissue and subjected to thorough analysis to understand its role in the development of obesity.
Methods and Results
EfnB1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in adipose tissues of obese mice and such reduction was mainly observed in mature adipocytes. Exposure of 3T3-L1 adipocytes to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and their culture with RAW264.7 cells reduced EFNB1 levels. Knockdown of adipose EFNB1 increased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (Mcp-1) mRNA level and augmented the TNF-α-mediated THP-1 monocyte adhesion to adipocytes. Adenovirus-mediated adipose EFNB1-overexpression significantly reduced the increase in Mcp-1 mRNA level induced by coculture of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with RAW264.7 cells. Monocyte adherent assay showed that adipose EfnB1-overexpression significantly decreased the increase of monocyte adhesion by coculture with RAW264.7 cells. TNF-α-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) was reduced by EFNB1-overexpression.
Conclusions
EFNB1 contributes to the suppression of adipose inflammatory response. In obesity, reduction of adipose EFNB1 may accelerate the vicious cycle involved in adipose tissue inflammation.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0076199
PMCID: PMC3787942  PMID: 24098442
8.  Adiponectin Protein Exists in Aortic Endothelial Cells 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(8):e71271.
Aims
Inflammation is closely associated with the development of atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome. Adiponectin, an adipose-derived secretory protein, possesses an anti-atherosclerotic property. The present study was undertaken to elucidate the presence and significance of adiponectin in vasculature.
Methods and Results
Immunofluorescence staining was performed in aorta of wild-type (WT) mice and demonstrated that adiponectin was co-stained with CD31. Thoracic aorta was cut through and then aortic intima was carefully shaved from aorta. Western blotting showed the existence of adiponectin protein in aortic intima, while there was no adiponectin mRNA expression. Adiponectin knockout (Adipo-KO) and WT mice were administered with a low-dose and short-term lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (1 mg/kg of LPS for 4 hours). The endothelium vascular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were highly increased in Adipo-KO mice compared to WT mice after LPS administration.
Conclusions
Adiponectin protein exists in aortic endothelium under steady state and may protect vasculature from the initiation of atherosclerosis.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0071271
PMCID: PMC3742782  PMID: 23967179
9.  Vascular complications and changes in body mass index in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients with abdominal obesity 
Background
Although many Asian type 2 diabetic patients have been considered to be not obese and have low capacity of insulin secretion, the proportion of obese patients with visceral fat accumulation has increased in recent years. We found previously considerable number of Japanese non-obese subjects (body mass index (BMI) < 25 kg/m2) with visceral fat accumulation and multiple cardiovascular risk factors. The aim of the study was to investigate the difference in clinical features of type 2 diabetic patients with and without visceral fat accumulation, focusing on vascular complications and changes in BMI.
Methods
We enrolled 88 Japanese hospitalized type 2 diabetic patients. Abdominal obesity represented waist circumference (WC) of ≥85 cm for males and ≥90 cm for females (corresponding to visceral fat area of 100 cm2). Subjects were divided into two groups; with or without abdominal obesity.
Results
Hypertension, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular diseases were significantly more in the patients with abdominal obesity. The prevalence of cardiovascular disease in the non-obese patients (BMI < 25 kg/m2) with abdominal obesity were similar in obese patients (BMI ≥25 kg/m2). The mean BMI of the patients with abdominal obesity was < 25 kg/m2 at 20 years of age, but reached maximum to more than 30 kg/m2 in the course. Furthermore, substantial portion of the type 2 diabetic patients (52% in males and 43% in females) were not obese at 20 year-old (BMI < 25 kg/m2), but developed abdominal obesity by the time of admission.
Conclusion
These results emphasize the need to control multiple risk factors and prevent atherosclerotic disease in patients with abdominal obesity. The significant weight gain after 20 years of age in patients with abdominal obesity stresses the importance of lifestyle modification in younger generation, to prevent potential development of type 2 diabetes and future atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.
doi:10.1186/1475-2840-12-88
PMCID: PMC3698109  PMID: 23773268
Abdominal obesity; Type 2 diabetes; Waist circumference; Visceral fat accumulation; Body mass index; Cardiovascular disease
10.  Dipeptidyl peptidase‐4 inhibitors are effective in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients with sustained endogenous insulin‐secreting capacity, a higher body mass index and insulin resistance 
Abstract
Aims/Introduction
Recently, dipeptidyl peptidase‐4 (DPP‐4) inhibitors have become available in Japan. It has not yet been clarified what clinical parameters could discriminate DPP‐4 inhibitor‐effective patients from DPP‐4 inhibitor‐ineffective patients.
Materials and Methods
We reviewed 33 consecutive patients with type 2 diabetes admitted to Osaka University Hospital for glycemic control. All of the patients were treated with medical nutrition therapy plus insulin therapy to improve fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and postprandial glucose below 150 and 200 mg/dL, respectively. After insulin secretion and insulin resistance were evaluated, insulin was replaced by DPP‐4 inhibitors. The efficacy of DPP‐4 inhibitors was determined according to whether glycemic control was maintained at the target levels.
Results
Dipeptidyl peptidase‐4 inhibitors were effective in 16 of 33 patients. DPP‐4 inhibitor‐effective patients were younger than DPP‐4 inhibitor‐ineffective patients. Body mass index (BMI) was significantly higher in DPP‐4 inhibitor‐effective patients. Endogeneous insulin‐secreting capacity, including insulinogenic index (II), fasting plasma C‐peptide (F‐CPR) and C‐peptide index (CPI), was more sustained in DPP‐4 inhibitor‐effective patients than DPP‐4 inhibitor‐ineffective patients. Insulin resistance evaluated by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA‐IR) was significantly higher in DPP‐4 inhibitor‐effective patients than DPP‐4 inhibitor‐ineffective patients. In receiver operating characteristic analyses, the cut‐off values for predicting the efficacy of DPP‐4 inhibitors were 0.07 for II, 1.5 ng/mL for F‐CPR, 1.0 for CPI, 23.0 kg/m2 for BMI, 1.3 for HOMA‐IR and 67.5 years for age.
Conclusions
Dipeptidyl peptidase‐4 inhibitors were effective in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients with sustained endogenous insulin‐secreting capacity, a higher BMI and insulin resistance.
doi:10.1111/jdi.12016
PMCID: PMC4019274  PMID: 24843651
Dipeptidyl peptidase‐4 inhibitor; Insulin secretion; Type 2 diabetes
11.  Telmisartan ameliorates insulin sensitivity by activating the AMPK/SIRT1 pathway in skeletal muscle of obese db/db mice 
Background
Telmisartan is a well-established angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker that improves insulin sensitivity in animal models of obesity and insulin resistance, as well as in humans. Telmisartan has been reported to function as a partial agonist of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ, which is also targeted by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent deacetylase (SIRT1). Here, we investigated the pathways through which telmisartan acts on skeletal muscle, in vitro as well as in vivo.
Methods
Nine-week-old male db/db mice were fed a 60% high-fat diet, with orally administrated either vehicle (carboxymethyl-cellulose, CMC), 5 mg/kg telmisartan, or 5 mg/kg telmisartan and 1 mg/kg GW9662, a selective irreversible antagonist of PPARγ, for 5 weeks. Effects of telmisartan on Sirt1 mRNA, AMPK phosphorylation, and NAD+/NADH ratio were determined in C2C12 cultured myocytes.
Results and discussion
Telmisartan treatment improved insulin sensitivity in obese db/db mice fed a high-fat diet and led to reduction in the size of hypertrophic pancreatic islets in these mice. Moreover, in vitro treatment with telmisartan led to increased expression of Sirt1 mRNA in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells; the increase in Sirt1 mRNA in telmisartan-treated C2C12 myoblasts occurred concomitantly with an increase in AMPK phosphorylation, an increase in NAD+/NADH ratio, and increases in the mRNA levels of PGC1α, FATP1, ACO, and GLUT4.
Conclusions
Our results indicate that telmisartan acts through a PPARγ-independent pathway, but at least partially exerts its effects by acting directly on skeletal muscle AMPK/SIRT1 pathways.
doi:10.1186/1475-2840-11-139
PMCID: PMC3527353  PMID: 23137106
Adiponectin; AMP-activated protein kinase; Obesity; Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ; SIRT1
12.  A Pilot Investigation of Visceral Fat Adiposity and Gene Expression Profile in Peripheral Blood Cells 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(10):e47377.
Evidence suggests that visceral fat accumulation plays a central role in the development of metabolic syndrome. Excess visceral fat causes local chronic low-grade inflammation and dysregulation of adipocytokines, which contribute in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. These changes may affect the gene expression in peripheral blood cells. This study for the first time examined the association between visceral fat adiposity and gene expression profile in peripheral blood cells. The gene expression profile was analyzed in peripheral blood cells from 28 obese subjects by microarray analysis. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed using peripheral blood cells from 57 obese subjects. Obesity was defined as body mass index (BMI) greater than 25 kg/m2 according to the Japanese criteria, and the estimated visceral fat area (eVFA) was measured by abdominal bioelectrical impedance. Analysis of gene expression profile was carried out with Agilent whole human genome 4×44 K oligo-DNA microarray. The expression of several genes related to circadian rhythm, inflammation, and oxidative stress correlated significantly with visceral fat accumulation. Period homolog 1 (PER1) mRNA level in blood cells correlated negatively with visceral fat adiposity. Stepwise multiple regression analysis identified eVFA as a significant determinant of PER1 expression. In conclusion, visceral fat adiposity correlated with the expression of genes related to circadian rhythm and inflammation in peripheral blood cells.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0047377
PMCID: PMC3472996  PMID: 23091619
13.  Efficacy of liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue, on body weight, eating behavior, and glycemic control, in Japanese obese type 2 diabetes 
Background
We recently reported that short-term treatment with liraglutide (20.0 ± 6.4 days) reduced body weight and improved some scales of eating behavior in Japanese type 2 diabetes inpatients. However, it remained uncertain whether such liraglutide-induced improvement is maintained after discharge from the hospital. The aim of the present study was to determine the long-term effects of liraglutide on body weight, glycemic control, and eating behavior in Japanese obese type 2 diabetics.
Methods
Patients with obesity (body mass index (BMI) >25 kg/m2) and type 2 diabetes were hospitalized at Osaka University Hospital between November 2010 and December 2011. BMI and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were examined on admission, at discharge and at 1, 3, and 6 months after discharge. For the liraglutide group (BMI; 31.3 ± 5.3 kg/m2, n = 29), patients were introduced to liraglutide after correction of hyperglycemic by insulin or oral glucose-lowering drugs and maintained on liraglutide after discharge. Eating behavior was assessed in patients treated with liraglutide using The Guideline For Obesity questionnaire issued by the Japan Society for the Study of Obesity, at admission, discharge, 3 and 6 months after discharge. For the insulin group (BMI; 29.1 ± 3.0 kg/m2, n = 28), each patient was treated with insulin during hospitalization and glycemic control maintained by insulin after discharge.
Results
Liraglutide induced significant and persistent weight loss from admission up to 6 months after discharge, while no change in body weight after discharge was noted in the insulin group. Liraglutide produced significant improvements in all major scores of eating behavior questionnaire items and such effect was maintained at 6 months after discharge. Weight loss correlated significantly with the decrease in scores for recognition of weight and constitution, sense of hunger, and eating style.
Conclusion
Liraglutide produced meaningful long-term weight loss and significantly improved eating behavior in obese Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes.
doi:10.1186/1475-2840-11-107
PMCID: PMC3459720  PMID: 22973968
Liraglutide; Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1); Obesity; Eating behavior; Diabetes; Incretin
14.  Liraglutide is effective in type 2 diabetic patients with sustained endogenous insulin‐secreting capacity 
Abstract
Aims/Introduction:  Recently, glucagon‐like peptide‐1 (GLP‐1) receptor agonists of liraglutide have become available in Japan. It has not yet been clarified what clinical parameters could discriminate liraglutide‐effective patients from liraglutide‐ineffective patients.
Materials and Methods:  We reviewed 23 consecutive patients with type 2 diabetes admitted to Osaka University Hospital for glycemic control. All of the patients were treated with diet plus insulin (or plus oral antidiabetic drugs) to improve fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and postprandial glucose below 150 and 200 mg/dL, respectively. After insulin secretion and insulin resistance were evaluated, insulin was replaced by liraglutide. The efficacy of liraglutide was determined according to whether glycemic control was maintained at the target levels.
Results:  Liraglutide was effective in 13 of 23 patients. There were significant differences in the parameters of insulin secretion, including fasting C‐peptide (F‐CPR), C‐peptide index (CPI), insulinogenic index (I.I.) and urine C‐peptide (U‐CPR), between liraglutide‐effective and ‐ineffective patients. The duration of diabetes was significantly shorter in liraglutide‐effective patients than in liraglutide‐ineffective patients. In receiver operating characteristic analyses, the cut‐off value for predicting the efficacy of liraglutide was 0.14 for I.I., 1.1 for CPI, 1.5 ng/mL for F‐CPR, 33.3 μg/day for U‐CPR and 19.5 years for duration of type 2 diabetes.
Conclusions:  Insulin secretion evaluated by F‐CPR, CPI, I.I., U‐CPR and the duration of type 2 diabetes were useful parameters for predicting the efficacy of liraglutide in patients with type 2 diabetes. (J Diabetes Invest, doi: 10.1111/j.2040‐1124.2011.00168.x, 2011)
doi:10.1111/j.2040-1124.2011.00168.x
PMCID: PMC4014952  PMID: 24843579
Glucagon‐like peptide‐1; Incretin; Type 2 diabetes
15.  Short-term effects of liraglutide on visceral fat adiposity, appetite, and food preference: a pilot study of obese Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes 
Background
To examine the effects of liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue, on visceral fat adiposity, appetite, food preference, and biomarkers of cardiovascular system in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes.
Methods
The study subjects were 20 inpatients with type 2 diabetes treated with liraglutide [age; 61.2 ± 14.0 years, duration of diabetes; 16.9 ± 6.6 years, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c); 9.1 ± 1.2%, body mass index (BMI); 28.3 ± 5.2 kg/m2, mean ± SD]. After improvement in glycemic control by insulin or oral glucose-lowering agents, patients were switched to liraglutide. We assessed the estimated visceral fat area (eVFA) by abdominal bioelectrical impedance analysis, glycemic control by the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and eating behavior by the Japan Society for the Study of Obesity questionnaire.
Results
Treatment with liraglutide (dose range: 0.3 to 0.9 mg/day) for 20.0 ± 6.4 days significantly reduced waist circumference, waist/hip ratio, eVFA. It also significantly improved the scores of eating behavior, food preference and the urge for fat intake and tended to reduce scores for sense of hunger. Liraglutide increased serum C-peptide immunoreactivity and disposition index.
Conclusions
Short-term treatment with liraglutide improved visceral fat adiposity, appetite, food preference and the urge for fat intake in obese Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes.
doi:10.1186/1475-2840-10-109
PMCID: PMC3260096  PMID: 22132774
liraglutide; glucagon-like peptide-1; obesity; eating behavior
16.  Adiponectin deficiency exacerbates lipopolysaccharide/D-galactosamine-induced liver injury in mice 
AIM: To examine the effects of adiponectin on the functions of Kupffer cells, key modulators of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) -induced liver injury.
METHODS: D-galactosamine (GalN) and LPS were injected intraperitoneally into adiponectin-/- mice and wild type mice. Kupffer cells, isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats, were preincubated with or without adiponectin, and then treated with LPS.
RESULTS: In knockout mice, GalN/LPS injection significantly lowered the survival rate, significantly raised the plasma levels of alanine transaminase and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and significantly reduced IL-10 levels compared with wild type mice. TNF-α gene expression in the liver was which higher and those of IL-10 were lower in knockout mice than in wild type mice. In cultured adiponectin-pre-treated Kupffer cells, LPS significantly lowered TNF-α levels and raised IL-10 levels in the culture media and their respective gene expression levels, compared with Kupffer cells without adiponectin-pre-treatment.
CONCLUSION: Adiponectin supresses TNF-α production and induces IL-10 production by Kupffer cells in response to LPS stimulation, and a lack of adiponectin enhances LPS-induced liver injury.
doi:10.3748/wjg.v12.i21.3352
PMCID: PMC4087865  PMID: 16733851
Adiponectin; Lipopolysaccharide; Kupffer cell; TNF-alpha; IL10

Results 1-16 (16)