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1.  Reply to Elliot Shevel 
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0435-8
PMCID: PMC3311828
2.  Reply to Elliot Shevel 
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0435-8
PMCID: PMC3311828
5.  Results of a patient survey for an implantable neurostimulator to treat migraine headaches 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(3):239-241.
Migraine attacks are believed to involve activation of the trigeminovascular system and trigeminal-parasympathetic reflex, which is mediated through the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG). An implantable SPG neurostimulator has been developed to apply on-demand SPG stimulation for the treatment of severe primary headache. The neurostimulator is implanted via an oral incision and placed along the maxilla, with the lead placed at the SPG. The neurostimulator contains no battery and is powered and controlled via a handheld remote controller. The potential interest of patients with high-frequency, high-disability migraine in having a SPG neurostimulator implanted to treat migraine is unknown. We aimed to evaluate patient interest to undergo such an implantation procedure and to participate in a clinical investigation of on-demand SPG stimulation for migraine by conducting a survey at the Ghent University Hospital in 41 migraineurs. Seventy-seven percent (77%) of subjects expressed an interest in participating in a clinical investigation requiring implantation of a SPG neurostimulator when headache frequency and severity were considered and 69% when pain relief experienced with current migraine treatment was considered. Preventive and acute medications were used in 64 and 95% of the subjects, respectively, and provided a reported reduction of headache frequency, duration and pain. However, acute medications were frequently associated with headache recurrence and bothersome side effects. Results indicate that a majority of high-frequency, high-disability migraineurs, many of whom achieve pain relief with their current medications, have an interest in participating in a clinical investigation of an implantable SPG neurostimulator for the treatment of migraine headache.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0430-0
PMCID: PMC3311826  PMID: 22395639
Sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG); Migraine; Headache; Neuromodulation; Neurostimulation
6.  Results of a patient survey for an implantable neurostimulator to treat migraine headaches 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(3):239-241.
Migraine attacks are believed to involve activation of the trigeminovascular system and trigeminal-parasympathetic reflex, which is mediated through the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG). An implantable SPG neurostimulator has been developed to apply on-demand SPG stimulation for the treatment of severe primary headache. The neurostimulator is implanted via an oral incision and placed along the maxilla, with the lead placed at the SPG. The neurostimulator contains no battery and is powered and controlled via a handheld remote controller. The potential interest of patients with high-frequency, high-disability migraine in having a SPG neurostimulator implanted to treat migraine is unknown. We aimed to evaluate patient interest to undergo such an implantation procedure and to participate in a clinical investigation of on-demand SPG stimulation for migraine by conducting a survey at the Ghent University Hospital in 41 migraineurs. Seventy-seven percent (77%) of subjects expressed an interest in participating in a clinical investigation requiring implantation of a SPG neurostimulator when headache frequency and severity were considered and 69% when pain relief experienced with current migraine treatment was considered. Preventive and acute medications were used in 64 and 95% of the subjects, respectively, and provided a reported reduction of headache frequency, duration and pain. However, acute medications were frequently associated with headache recurrence and bothersome side effects. Results indicate that a majority of high-frequency, high-disability migraineurs, many of whom achieve pain relief with their current medications, have an interest in participating in a clinical investigation of an implantable SPG neurostimulator for the treatment of migraine headache.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0430-0
PMCID: PMC3311826  PMID: 22395639
Sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG); Migraine; Headache; Neuromodulation; Neurostimulation
7.  Prevalence of primary headaches in Germany: results of the German Headache Consortium Study 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(3):215-223.
We investigated the prevalence of migraine (MIG), tension-type headache (TTH), and chronic headache in a population-based sample in Germany. A total of 18,000 subjects aged between 18 and 65 years were screened from 2003 until 2005 using a validated questionnaire. Overall 9,944 participants (55.2%) responded (mean age 43 ± 13.1 years, 52.7% women). Headache frequency <15 days/month was reported by 5,350 (55.5%) subjects of whom 1,601 (16.6%, [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 15.9–17.4]) reported episodic MIG, 1,202 (12.5%, 95% CI 11.8–13.1) episodic TTH, and 1,150 (11.9%, [11.3–12.6]) episodic MIG + episodic TTH, 1,396 (14.5%, [13.8–15.2]) unclassifiable headache. In women, episodic MIG peaked between 36 and 40 years, episodic MIG + TTH between 18 and 35 years and episodic TTH between 56 and 66 years. In men, episodic MIG was predominant between 36 and 45 years, episodic MIG + TTH between 26 and 35 years and episodic TTH showed comparable frequency between 36 and 66 years. Headache ≥15 days/month was reported by 2.6% (n = 255, [95% CI 2.3–3]). Chronic MIG was reported by 1.1% (n = 108, [0.91–1.33]), chronic TTH (n = 50, [95% CI 0.4–0.7]), chronic MIG + TTH 0.8% (n = 74, 95% CI 0.6–0.9) and unclassifiable headache 0.2% (n = 23, [95% CI 0.1–0.3]). Chronic headache was more frequent in women compared to men with the highest prevalence between 46 and 65 years. It is of note that the number of subjects with chronic headache is small in all age groups. The results of our large, population-based study provide reliable, age- and sex-specific estimates of the prevalence of primary headache disorders in Germany. The prevalence with respect to episodic and chronic primary headache disorders in Germany is comparable to other European countries and the USA.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0425-x
PMCID: PMC3311829  PMID: 22395638
Migraine; Tension-type headache; Chronic daily headache; Prevalence
8.  Prevalence of primary headaches in Germany: results of the German Headache Consortium Study 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(3):215-223.
We investigated the prevalence of migraine (MIG), tension-type headache (TTH), and chronic headache in a population-based sample in Germany. A total of 18,000 subjects aged between 18 and 65 years were screened from 2003 until 2005 using a validated questionnaire. Overall 9,944 participants (55.2%) responded (mean age 43 ± 13.1 years, 52.7% women). Headache frequency <15 days/month was reported by 5,350 (55.5%) subjects of whom 1,601 (16.6%, [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 15.9–17.4]) reported episodic MIG, 1,202 (12.5%, 95% CI 11.8–13.1) episodic TTH, and 1,150 (11.9%, [11.3–12.6]) episodic MIG + episodic TTH, 1,396 (14.5%, [13.8–15.2]) unclassifiable headache. In women, episodic MIG peaked between 36 and 40 years, episodic MIG + TTH between 18 and 35 years and episodic TTH between 56 and 66 years. In men, episodic MIG was predominant between 36 and 45 years, episodic MIG + TTH between 26 and 35 years and episodic TTH showed comparable frequency between 36 and 66 years. Headache ≥15 days/month was reported by 2.6% (n = 255, [95% CI 2.3–3]). Chronic MIG was reported by 1.1% (n = 108, [0.91–1.33]), chronic TTH (n = 50, [95% CI 0.4–0.7]), chronic MIG + TTH 0.8% (n = 74, 95% CI 0.6–0.9) and unclassifiable headache 0.2% (n = 23, [95% CI 0.1–0.3]). Chronic headache was more frequent in women compared to men with the highest prevalence between 46 and 65 years. It is of note that the number of subjects with chronic headache is small in all age groups. The results of our large, population-based study provide reliable, age- and sex-specific estimates of the prevalence of primary headache disorders in Germany. The prevalence with respect to episodic and chronic primary headache disorders in Germany is comparable to other European countries and the USA.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0425-x
PMCID: PMC3311829  PMID: 22395638
Migraine; Tension-type headache; Chronic daily headache; Prevalence
9.  Occipital nerve block is effective in craniofacial neuralgias but not in idiopathic persistent facial pain 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(3):199-213.
Occipital nerve block (ONB) has been used in several primary headache syndromes with good results. Information on its effects in facial pain is sparse. In this chart review, the efficacy of ONB using lidocaine and dexamethasone was evaluated in 20 patients with craniofacial pain syndromes comprising 8 patients with trigeminal neuralgia, 6 with trigeminal neuropathic pain, 5 with persistent idiopathic facial pain and 1 with occipital neuralgia. Response was defined as an at least 50% reduction of original pain. Mean response rate was 55% with greatest efficacy in trigeminal (75%) and occipital neuralgia (100%) and less efficacy in trigeminal neuropathic pain (50%) and persistent idiopathic facial pain (20%). The effects lasted for an average of 27 days with sustained benefits for 69, 77 and 107 days in three patients. Side effects were reported in 50%, albeit transient and mild in nature. ONBs are effective in trigeminal pain involving the second and third branch and seem to be most effective in craniofacial neuralgias. They should be considered in facial pain before more invasive approaches, such as thermocoagulation or vascular decompression, are performed, given that side effects are mild and the procedure is minimally invasive.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0417-x
PMCID: PMC3311831  PMID: 22383125
Trigeminal neuralgia; Facial pain; Trigeminal neuropathic pain; Occipital nerve block; Occipital; Neuralgia
10.  Occipital nerve block is effective in craniofacial neuralgias but not in idiopathic persistent facial pain 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(3):199-213.
Occipital nerve block (ONB) has been used in several primary headache syndromes with good results. Information on its effects in facial pain is sparse. In this chart review, the efficacy of ONB using lidocaine and dexamethasone was evaluated in 20 patients with craniofacial pain syndromes comprising 8 patients with trigeminal neuralgia, 6 with trigeminal neuropathic pain, 5 with persistent idiopathic facial pain and 1 with occipital neuralgia. Response was defined as an at least 50% reduction of original pain. Mean response rate was 55% with greatest efficacy in trigeminal (75%) and occipital neuralgia (100%) and less efficacy in trigeminal neuropathic pain (50%) and persistent idiopathic facial pain (20%). The effects lasted for an average of 27 days with sustained benefits for 69, 77 and 107 days in three patients. Side effects were reported in 50%, albeit transient and mild in nature. ONBs are effective in trigeminal pain involving the second and third branch and seem to be most effective in craniofacial neuralgias. They should be considered in facial pain before more invasive approaches, such as thermocoagulation or vascular decompression, are performed, given that side effects are mild and the procedure is minimally invasive.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0417-x
PMCID: PMC3311831  PMID: 22383125
Trigeminal neuralgia; Facial pain; Trigeminal neuropathic pain; Occipital nerve block; Occipital; Neuralgia
11.  Migraine in women: the role of hormones and their impact on vascular diseases 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(3):177-189.
Migraine is a predominantly female disorder. Menarche, menstruation, pregnancy, and menopause, and also the use of hormonal contraceptives and hormone replacement treatment may influence migraine occurrence. Migraine usually starts after menarche, occurs more frequently in the days just before or during menstruation, and ameliorates during pregnancy and menopause. Those variations are mediated by fluctuation of estrogen levels through their influence on cellular excitability or cerebral vasculature. Moreover, administration of exogenous hormones may cause worsening of migraine as may expose migrainous women to an increased risk of vascular disease. In fact, migraine with aura represents a risk factor for stroke, cardiac disease, and vascular mortality. Studies have shown that administration of combined oral contraceptives to migraineurs may further increase the risk for ischemic stroke. Consequently, in women suffering from migraine with aura caution should be deserved when prescribing combined oral contraceptives.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0424-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0424-y
PMCID: PMC3311830  PMID: 22367631
Migraine; Hormones; Contraceptive; Pregnancy; Menopause
12.  Migraine in women: the role of hormones and their impact on vascular diseases 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(3):177-189.
Migraine is a predominantly female disorder. Menarche, menstruation, pregnancy, and menopause, and also the use of hormonal contraceptives and hormone replacement treatment may influence migraine occurrence. Migraine usually starts after menarche, occurs more frequently in the days just before or during menstruation, and ameliorates during pregnancy and menopause. Those variations are mediated by fluctuation of estrogen levels through their influence on cellular excitability or cerebral vasculature. Moreover, administration of exogenous hormones may cause worsening of migraine as may expose migrainous women to an increased risk of vascular disease. In fact, migraine with aura represents a risk factor for stroke, cardiac disease, and vascular mortality. Studies have shown that administration of combined oral contraceptives to migraineurs may further increase the risk for ischemic stroke. Consequently, in women suffering from migraine with aura caution should be deserved when prescribing combined oral contraceptives.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0424-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0424-y
PMCID: PMC3311830  PMID: 22367631
Migraine; Hormones; Contraceptive; Pregnancy; Menopause
13.  Placebo and other psychological interactions in headache treatment 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(3):191-198.
We present a theory according which a headache treatment acts through a specific biological effect (when it exists), a placebo effect linked to both expectancy and repetition of its administration (conditioning), and a non-specific psychological effect. The respective part of these components varies with the treatments and the clinical situations. During antiquity, suggestions and beliefs were the mainstays of headache treatment. The word placebo appeared at the beginning of the eighteenth century. Controversies about its effect came from an excessive interpretation due to methodological bias, inadequate consideration of the variation of the measure (regression to the mean) and of the natural course of the disease. Several powerful studies on placebo effect showed that the nature of the treatment, the associated announce, the patients’ expectancy, and the repetition of the procedures are of paramount importance. The placebo expectancy is associated with an activation of pre-frontal, anterior cingular, accumbens, and periacqueducal grey opioidergic neurons possibly triggered by the dopaminergic meso-limbic system. In randomized control trials, several arms design could theoretically give information concerning the respective part of the different component of the outcome and control the natural course of the disease. However, for migraine and tension type headache attacks treatment, no three arm (verum, placebo, and natural course) trial is available in the literature. Indirect evidence of a placebo effect in migraine attack treatment, comes from the high amplitude of the improvement observed in the placebo arms (28% of the patients). This figure is lower (6%) when using the harder criterium of pain free at 2 h. But these data disregard the effect of the natural course. For prophylactic treatment with oral medication, the trials performed in the last decades report an improvement in 21% of the patients in the placebo arms. However, in these studies the duration of administration was limited, the control of attacks uncertain as well as the evolution of the co-morbid psycho-pathology. Considering the reviews and meta-analysis of complex prophylactic procedures, it must be concluded that their effect is mostly linked to a placebo and non-specific psychological effects. Acupuncture may have a slight specific effect on tension type headache, but not on migraine. Manual therapy studies do not exhibit difference between manipulation, mobilization, and controls; touch has no proven specific effect. A comprehensive efficacy review of biofeedback studies concludes to a small specific effect on tension type headache but not on migraine. A review of behavioral treatment conclude to an interesting mean improvement but did not demonstrated a specific effect with the exception of a four arm study including a pseudo meditation control group. Expectation-linked placebo, conditioning, and non-specific psychological effects vary according clinical situations and psychological context; likely low in RCT, high after anempathic medical contact, and at its maximum with a desired charismatic healer. The announcements of doctors strongly influence the beliefs of patients, and in consequence their pain and anxiety sensibilities; this modulates the amplitude of the placebo and the non-specific psychological effects and is therefore a major determinant of the therapeutic success. Furthermore, any repetitive contact, even through a placebo, may interfere positively with the psychopathological co-morbidity. One has to keep in mind that the non-specific psychological interactions play a major role in the improvement of the majority of the headache sufferers.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0422-0
PMCID: PMC3311834  PMID: 22367630
Migraine; Placebo; Headache treatment
14.  Placebo and other psychological interactions in headache treatment 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(3):191-198.
We present a theory according which a headache treatment acts through a specific biological effect (when it exists), a placebo effect linked to both expectancy and repetition of its administration (conditioning), and a non-specific psychological effect. The respective part of these components varies with the treatments and the clinical situations. During antiquity, suggestions and beliefs were the mainstays of headache treatment. The word placebo appeared at the beginning of the eighteenth century. Controversies about its effect came from an excessive interpretation due to methodological bias, inadequate consideration of the variation of the measure (regression to the mean) and of the natural course of the disease. Several powerful studies on placebo effect showed that the nature of the treatment, the associated announce, the patients’ expectancy, and the repetition of the procedures are of paramount importance. The placebo expectancy is associated with an activation of pre-frontal, anterior cingular, accumbens, and periacqueducal grey opioidergic neurons possibly triggered by the dopaminergic meso-limbic system. In randomized control trials, several arms design could theoretically give information concerning the respective part of the different component of the outcome and control the natural course of the disease. However, for migraine and tension type headache attacks treatment, no three arm (verum, placebo, and natural course) trial is available in the literature. Indirect evidence of a placebo effect in migraine attack treatment, comes from the high amplitude of the improvement observed in the placebo arms (28% of the patients). This figure is lower (6%) when using the harder criterium of pain free at 2 h. But these data disregard the effect of the natural course. For prophylactic treatment with oral medication, the trials performed in the last decades report an improvement in 21% of the patients in the placebo arms. However, in these studies the duration of administration was limited, the control of attacks uncertain as well as the evolution of the co-morbid psycho-pathology. Considering the reviews and meta-analysis of complex prophylactic procedures, it must be concluded that their effect is mostly linked to a placebo and non-specific psychological effects. Acupuncture may have a slight specific effect on tension type headache, but not on migraine. Manual therapy studies do not exhibit difference between manipulation, mobilization, and controls; touch has no proven specific effect. A comprehensive efficacy review of biofeedback studies concludes to a small specific effect on tension type headache but not on migraine. A review of behavioral treatment conclude to an interesting mean improvement but did not demonstrated a specific effect with the exception of a four arm study including a pseudo meditation control group. Expectation-linked placebo, conditioning, and non-specific psychological effects vary according clinical situations and psychological context; likely low in RCT, high after anempathic medical contact, and at its maximum with a desired charismatic healer. The announcements of doctors strongly influence the beliefs of patients, and in consequence their pain and anxiety sensibilities; this modulates the amplitude of the placebo and the non-specific psychological effects and is therefore a major determinant of the therapeutic success. Furthermore, any repetitive contact, even through a placebo, may interfere positively with the psychopathological co-morbidity. One has to keep in mind that the non-specific psychological interactions play a major role in the improvement of the majority of the headache sufferers.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0422-0
PMCID: PMC3311834  PMID: 22367630
Migraine; Placebo; Headache treatment
15.  Refractory chronic migraine: long-term follow-up using a refractory rating scale 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(3):225-229.
Refractory chronic migraine (RCM) is often associated with disability and a low quality of life (QOL). RCM ranges in severity from mild to severe. There would be a benefit both clinically and in research use in categorizing RCM patients according to severity. This study utilized a unique RCM severity rating scale, tracking the clinical course over 10 years. A total of 129 patients, ages 19–72, were assigned a severity rating of 2–10 (10 = worst). Pain level and QOL were assessed. Over the 10 years, 73% of all pts. had a 30% or more decline in pain. Pain levels improved 45% in mild pts., 42% in mod. pts., and 36% in severe pts. Pain was the same, or worse, in 4% of mild, 15% of mod., and 18% of severe pts. QOL in the mild group improved 35% over 10 years. In moderate pts., QOL improved 32%, while for the severe group QOL improved 33%. While pain and QOL improved across all three groups at the end of 10 years, the severe group remained with significantly more pain and decreased QOL than in the milder groups. The medications that helped significantly included: opioids (63% of pts. utilized opioids), frequent triptans (31%), butalbital (17%), onabotulinumtoxinA (16%), stimulants (12%), and other “various preventives” (9%). RCM pts. were rated using a refractory rating scale with the clinical course assessed over 10 years. Pain and QOL improved in all groups. In the severe group, pain and QOL improved, but still lagged behind the mild and moderate groups. Opioids and (frequent) triptans were the most commonly utilized meds.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0423-z
PMCID: PMC3311833  PMID: 22367626
Chronic migraine; Refractory chronic migraine; Refractory headache; Chronic daily headache
16.  Refractory chronic migraine: long-term follow-up using a refractory rating scale 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(3):225-229.
Refractory chronic migraine (RCM) is often associated with disability and a low quality of life (QOL). RCM ranges in severity from mild to severe. There would be a benefit both clinically and in research use in categorizing RCM patients according to severity. This study utilized a unique RCM severity rating scale, tracking the clinical course over 10 years. A total of 129 patients, ages 19–72, were assigned a severity rating of 2–10 (10 = worst). Pain level and QOL were assessed. Over the 10 years, 73% of all pts. had a 30% or more decline in pain. Pain levels improved 45% in mild pts., 42% in mod. pts., and 36% in severe pts. Pain was the same, or worse, in 4% of mild, 15% of mod., and 18% of severe pts. QOL in the mild group improved 35% over 10 years. In moderate pts., QOL improved 32%, while for the severe group QOL improved 33%. While pain and QOL improved across all three groups at the end of 10 years, the severe group remained with significantly more pain and decreased QOL than in the milder groups. The medications that helped significantly included: opioids (63% of pts. utilized opioids), frequent triptans (31%), butalbital (17%), onabotulinumtoxinA (16%), stimulants (12%), and other “various preventives” (9%). RCM pts. were rated using a refractory rating scale with the clinical course assessed over 10 years. Pain and QOL improved in all groups. In the severe group, pain and QOL improved, but still lagged behind the mild and moderate groups. Opioids and (frequent) triptans were the most commonly utilized meds.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0423-z
PMCID: PMC3311833  PMID: 22367626
Chronic migraine; Refractory chronic migraine; Refractory headache; Chronic daily headache
17.  Spontaneous cervicocephalic arterial dissection with headache and neck pain as the only symptom 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(3):247-253.
Background and objective
Cervicocephalic arterial dissection can cause both ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke. However, spontaneous cervicocephalic arterial dissection presenting only with headache and neck pain has rarely been reported. The clinical features of patients with spontaneous cervicocephalic arterial dissection presenting only with headache and neck pain were investigated.
Methods
The subjects were seven patients with spontaneous cervicocephalic arterial dissection with headache and neck pain alone who were admitted to our hospital during the past 3 years. The clinical features of these patients were investigated. The diagnosis of arterial dissection was based on the criteria of the Strategies Against Stroke Study for Young Adults in Japan.
Results
The age of the patients (3 males, 4 females) ranged from 35 to 79 (mean, 51.0 ± 16.2) years. Six patients had vertebral artery dissection, one had internal carotid artery dissection, and one had an association of vertebral and internal carotid artery dissection. With the exception of one patient, the headache and neck pain were unilateral. All patients with vertebral artery dissection complained of posterior cervical or occipital pain. In the cases of internal carotid artery dissection, one patient complained of temporal pain, and one patient with co-existing vertebral artery dissection complained of posterior cervical pain. The mode of onset was acute in five patients, thunderclap in one, and gradual and progressive in one. The pain was severe in all cases. Five patients complained of continuous pain, while two had intermittent pain. The quality of the pain was described as throbbing by five patients and constrictive by two. The headache and neck pain persisted for 1 week or longer in six of the seven patients.
Conclusion
Cervicocephalic arterial dissection should be suspected when patients complain of intense unilateral posterior cervical and occipital pain or temporal pain.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0420-2
PMCID: PMC3311823  PMID: 22350749
Spontaneous cervicocephalic arterial dissection; Headache; Neck pain
18.  Spontaneous cervicocephalic arterial dissection with headache and neck pain as the only symptom 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(3):247-253.
Background and objective
Cervicocephalic arterial dissection can cause both ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke. However, spontaneous cervicocephalic arterial dissection presenting only with headache and neck pain has rarely been reported. The clinical features of patients with spontaneous cervicocephalic arterial dissection presenting only with headache and neck pain were investigated.
Methods
The subjects were seven patients with spontaneous cervicocephalic arterial dissection with headache and neck pain alone who were admitted to our hospital during the past 3 years. The clinical features of these patients were investigated. The diagnosis of arterial dissection was based on the criteria of the Strategies Against Stroke Study for Young Adults in Japan.
Results
The age of the patients (3 males, 4 females) ranged from 35 to 79 (mean, 51.0 ± 16.2) years. Six patients had vertebral artery dissection, one had internal carotid artery dissection, and one had an association of vertebral and internal carotid artery dissection. With the exception of one patient, the headache and neck pain were unilateral. All patients with vertebral artery dissection complained of posterior cervical or occipital pain. In the cases of internal carotid artery dissection, one patient complained of temporal pain, and one patient with co-existing vertebral artery dissection complained of posterior cervical pain. The mode of onset was acute in five patients, thunderclap in one, and gradual and progressive in one. The pain was severe in all cases. Five patients complained of continuous pain, while two had intermittent pain. The quality of the pain was described as throbbing by five patients and constrictive by two. The headache and neck pain persisted for 1 week or longer in six of the seven patients.
Conclusion
Cervicocephalic arterial dissection should be suspected when patients complain of intense unilateral posterior cervical and occipital pain or temporal pain.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0420-2
PMCID: PMC3311823  PMID: 22350749
Spontaneous cervicocephalic arterial dissection; Headache; Neck pain
19.  Late onset and early onset aura: the same disorder 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(3):243-245.
Late onset aura (LOA) is usually considered benign but raises diagnostic uncertainties. We compared individuals with LOA (>45 years of age at aura onset) with those of early onset (EOA) in clinical features, vascular risk factors and imaging, in a retrospective study design including patients with migraine aura and age >44 years at first visit. In 77 cases (51 EOA and 26 LOA), no differences were found in gender distribution, family or personal history of migraine without aura, type of aura symptoms or imaging findings. LOA patients’ were more likely to not fulfil all ICHD-II aura criteria and to lack headache. This data suggest that LOA and EOA are overall identical but there are differences in presentation that deserve a better characterization by a prospective study.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0419-8
PMCID: PMC3311824  PMID: 22350748
20.  Late onset and early onset aura: the same disorder 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(3):243-245.
Late onset aura (LOA) is usually considered benign but raises diagnostic uncertainties. We compared individuals with LOA (>45 years of age at aura onset) with those of early onset (EOA) in clinical features, vascular risk factors and imaging, in a retrospective study design including patients with migraine aura and age >44 years at first visit. In 77 cases (51 EOA and 26 LOA), no differences were found in gender distribution, family or personal history of migraine without aura, type of aura symptoms or imaging findings. LOA patients’ were more likely to not fulfil all ICHD-II aura criteria and to lack headache. This data suggest that LOA and EOA are overall identical but there are differences in presentation that deserve a better characterization by a prospective study.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0419-8
PMCID: PMC3311824  PMID: 22350748
21.  Burning mouth syndrome in Parkinson’s disease: dopamine as cure or cause? 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(3):255-257.
Burning mouth syndrome has been reported as being more common in Parkinson’s disease patients than the general population. While the pathophysiology is unclear, decreased dopamine levels and dopamine dysregulation are hypothesized to play a role. We report a patient with Parkinson’s disease who developed burning mouth syndrome with carbidopa/levodopa. Our patient had resolution of burning mouth symptoms when carbidopa/levodopa was replaced with a dopamine agonist. Based on our patient’s clinical course, in conjunction with earlier studies assessing the relationship between burning mouth syndrome and Parkinson’s disease, we discuss a potential role for dopamine in burning mouth syndrome in Parkinson’s disease.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0421-1
PMCID: PMC3311832  PMID: 22322657
Parkinson’s disease; Burning mouth syndrome; Carbidopa/levodopa; Dopamine; Pain
22.  Burning mouth syndrome in Parkinson’s disease: dopamine as cure or cause? 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(3):255-257.
Burning mouth syndrome has been reported as being more common in Parkinson’s disease patients than the general population. While the pathophysiology is unclear, decreased dopamine levels and dopamine dysregulation are hypothesized to play a role. We report a patient with Parkinson’s disease who developed burning mouth syndrome with carbidopa/levodopa. Our patient had resolution of burning mouth symptoms when carbidopa/levodopa was replaced with a dopamine agonist. Based on our patient’s clinical course, in conjunction with earlier studies assessing the relationship between burning mouth syndrome and Parkinson’s disease, we discuss a potential role for dopamine in burning mouth syndrome in Parkinson’s disease.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0421-1
PMCID: PMC3311832  PMID: 22322657
Parkinson’s disease; Burning mouth syndrome; Carbidopa/levodopa; Dopamine; Pain
23.  Grey matter volume alterations in CADASIL: a voxel-based morphometry study 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(3):231-238.
CADASIL is a hereditary disease characterized by cerebral subcortical microangiopathy leading to early onset cerebral strokes and progressive severe cognitive impairment. Until now, only few studies have investigated the extent and localization of grey matter (GM) involvement. The purpose of our study was to evaluate GM volume alterations in CADASIL patients compared to healthy subjects. We also looked for correlations between global and regional white matter (WM) lesion load and GM volume alterations. 14 genetically proved CADASIL patients and 12 healthy subjects were enrolled in our study. Brain MRI (1.5 T) was acquired in all subjects. Optimized-voxel based morphometry method was applied for the comparison of brain volumes between CADASIL patients and controls. Global and lobar WM lesion loads were calculated for each patient and used as covariate-of-interest for regression analyses with SPM-8. Compared to controls, patients showed GM volume reductions in bilateral temporal lobes (p < 0.05; FDR-corrected). Regression analysis in the patient group revealed a correlation between total WM lesion load and temporal GM atrophy (p < 0.05; uncorrected), not between temporal lesion load and GM atrophy. Temporal GM volume reduction was demonstrated in CADASIL patients compared to controls; it was related to WM lesion load involving the whole brain but not to lobar and, specifically, temporal WM lesion load. Complex interactions between sub-cortical and cortical damage should be hypothesized.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0418-9
PMCID: PMC3311825  PMID: 22302157
CADASIL; Dementia; DARTEL; VBM
24.  Grey matter volume alterations in CADASIL: a voxel-based morphometry study 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(3):231-238.
CADASIL is a hereditary disease characterized by cerebral subcortical microangiopathy leading to early onset cerebral strokes and progressive severe cognitive impairment. Until now, only few studies have investigated the extent and localization of grey matter (GM) involvement. The purpose of our study was to evaluate GM volume alterations in CADASIL patients compared to healthy subjects. We also looked for correlations between global and regional white matter (WM) lesion load and GM volume alterations. 14 genetically proved CADASIL patients and 12 healthy subjects were enrolled in our study. Brain MRI (1.5 T) was acquired in all subjects. Optimized-voxel based morphometry method was applied for the comparison of brain volumes between CADASIL patients and controls. Global and lobar WM lesion loads were calculated for each patient and used as covariate-of-interest for regression analyses with SPM-8. Compared to controls, patients showed GM volume reductions in bilateral temporal lobes (p < 0.05; FDR-corrected). Regression analysis in the patient group revealed a correlation between total WM lesion load and temporal GM atrophy (p < 0.05; uncorrected), not between temporal lesion load and GM atrophy. Temporal GM volume reduction was demonstrated in CADASIL patients compared to controls; it was related to WM lesion load involving the whole brain but not to lobar and, specifically, temporal WM lesion load. Complex interactions between sub-cortical and cortical damage should be hypothesized.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0418-9
PMCID: PMC3311825  PMID: 22302157
CADASIL; Dementia; DARTEL; VBM
25.  Reference programme: Diagnosis and treatment of headache disorders and facial pain. Danish Headache Society, 2nd Edition, 2012 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(Suppl 1):1-29.
Headache and facial pain are among the most common, disabling and costly disorders in Europe. Correct diagnosis and treatment is important for achieving a high quality of care. As a national organisation whose role is to educate and advocate for the needs of patients with primary headaches, the Danish Headache Society has set up a task force to develop a set of guidelines for the diagnosis, organisation and treatment of the most common types of headaches and for trigeminal neuralgia in Denmark. The guideline was published in Danish in 2010 and has been a great success. The Danish Headache Society decided to translate and publish our guideline in English to stimulate the discussion on optimal organisation and treatment of headache disorders and to encourage other national headache authorities to produce their own guidelines. The recommendations regarding the most common primary headaches and trigeminal neuralgia are largely in accordance with the European guidelines produced by the European Federation of Neurological Societies. The guideline provides a practical tool for use in daily clinical practice for primary care physicians, neurologists with a common interest in headache, as well as other health-care professionals treating headache patients. The guideline first describes how to examine and diagnose the headache patient and how headache treatment is organised in Denmark. This description is followed by individual sections on the characteristics, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment of each of the major headache disorders and trigeminal neuralgia. The guideline includes many tables to facilitate a quick overview. Finally, the particular problems regarding headache in children and headache in relation to female hormones and pregnancy are described.
doi:10.1007/s10194-011-0402-9
PMCID: PMC3266527  PMID: 22270537

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