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1.  Development and Initial Testing of the Stroke Rapid-Treatment Readiness Tool 
ABSTRACT
No instruments are currently available to help health systems identify target areas for reducing door-to-needle times for the administration of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator to eligible patients with ischemic stroke. A 67-item Likert-scale survey was administered by telephone to stroke personnel at 252 U.S. hospitals participating in the “Get With The Guidelines-Stroke” quality improvement program. Factor analysis was used to refine the instrument to a four-factor 29-item instrument that can be used by hospitals to assess their readiness to administer intravenous tissue plasminogen activator within 60 minutes of patient hospital arrival.
doi:10.1097/JNN.0000000000000082
PMCID: PMC4165480  PMID: 25099063
acute stroke therapy; intervention; reperfusion; therapy; tPA; treatment
2.  Medication coaching program for patients with minor stroke or TIA: A pilot study 
BMC Public Health  2012;12:549.
Background
Patients who are hospitalized with a first or recurrent stroke often are discharged with new medications or adjustment to the doses of pre-admission medications, which can be confusing and pose safety issues if misunderstood. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility of medication coaching via telephone after discharge in patients with stroke.
Methods
Two-arm pilot study of a medication coaching program with 30 patients (20 intervention, 10 control). Consecutive patients admitted with stroke or TIA with at least 2 medications changed between admission and discharge were included. The medication coach contacted intervention arm patients post-discharge via phone call to discuss risk factors, review medications and triage patients’ questions to a stroke nurse and/or pharmacist. Intervention and control participants were contacted at 3 months for outcomes. The main outcomes were feasibility (appropriateness of script, ability to reach participants, and provide requested information) and participant evaluation of medication coaching.
Results
The median lengths of the coaching and follow-up calls with requested answers to these questions were 27 minutes and 12 minutes, respectively, and participant evaluations of the coaching were positive. The intervention participants were more likely to have seen their primary care provider than were control participants by 3 months post discharge.
Conclusions
This medication coaching study executed early after discharge demonstrated feasibility of coaching and educating stroke patients with a trained coach. Results from our small pilot showed a possible trend towards improved appointment-keeping with primary care providers in those who received coaching.
doi:10.1186/1471-2458-12-549
PMCID: PMC3490769  PMID: 22830539
Stroke; Transitions; Prevention; Patient education

Results 1-3 (3)