PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-3 (3)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Authors
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Hospital Financial Conditions and the Provision of Unprofitable Services 
Atlantic economic journal : AEJ  2009;37(3):259-277.
Increases in hospital financial pressure resulting from public and private payment policy may substantially reduce a hospital’s ability to provide certain services that are not well compensated or are frequently used by the uninsured. The objective of this study is to examine the impact of hospital financial condition on the provision of these unprofitable services for the insured and uninsured. Economic theory provides the conceptual underpinnings for the analysis, and a longitudinal empirical analysis is conducted for an eight-year study period. The results indicate that not-for-profit hospitals with strong financial performance provide more unprofitable services for the insured and uninsured than do not-for-profit hospitals with weaker condition. For-profit hospital provision of these services is not influenced by their financial condition and instead may reflect actions to meet community expectations or to offer a sufficiently broad service array to maintain the business of insured patients.
doi:10.1007/s11293-009-9183-9
PMCID: PMC3103087  PMID: 21625342
Hospital financial condition; Unprofitable services; Insured patients; Uninsured patients
2.  Black-White Disparities in Care in Nursing Homes 
Atlantic economic journal : AEJ  2009;37(3):299-314.
Nursing homes serve many severely ill poor people, including large numbers of racial/ethnic minority residents. Previous research indicates that blacks tend to receive care from lower quality nursing homes (Grabowski, 2004). Using the Institute of Medicine (IOM) definition of racial-ethnic disparities, this study decomposes nursing home disparities into within and across facility components. Using detailed person-level nursing home data, we find meaningful black-white disparities for one of the four risk-adjusted quality measures, with both within and across nursing home components of the disparity. The IOM approach, which recognizes mediation through payer status and education, has a small effect on measured disparities in this setting. Although we did not find disparities across the majority of quality measures and alternate disparity definitions, this approach can be applied to other health care services in an effort to disentangle the role of across and within facility variation and the role of potential mediators on racial/ethnic disparities.
doi:10.1007/s11293-009-9185-7
PMCID: PMC2760834  PMID: 20160968
3.  Racial/ethnic differences in the effects of psychiatric disorders on employment 
Atlantic economic journal : AEJ  2009;37(3):243-257.
Prior research on the disability burden of mental disorders has focused on the non-Latino white population, despite the growing size and importance of racial/ethnic minorities in the labor market and in the US population as a whole. This paper is one of the first to test for racial/ethnic differences in the effects of mental disorder on employment outcomes with data from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiological Studies (CPES). We find that recent psychiatric disorder is associated with a reduction in the likelihood of employment for men of all racial/ethnic groups relative to non Latino whites with the possible exception of Caribbeans. These findings are driven by the effects of anxiety and affective disorders. For females, only affective disorders appear to detract from employment overall. Much larger negative effects are found for Latino women with anxiety disorders.
doi:10.1007/s11293-009-9182-x
PMCID: PMC2773508  PMID: 19898677
racial/ethnic minorities; mental health; psychiatric disorders; labor market outcomes

Results 1-3 (3)