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1.  Influence of orbital eye position on vertical saccades in progressive supranuclear palsy 
Disturbance of vertical saccadesis a cardinal feature of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). We investigated whether the amplitude and peak velocity of saccades is affected by the orbital position fromwhich movements start in PSP patients and age-matched control subjects. Subjects made vertical saccades in response to ± 5 degree vertical target jumps with their heads in one of three positions: head “center,” head pitched forward ~15 degrees, and head pitched back ~ 15 degrees.All patients showed some effect of starting eye position, whether beginning in the upward or downward field of gaze, on saccade amplitude, peak velocity (PV), and net range of movement. Generally, reduction of amplitude and PV were commensurate and bidirectional in the affected hemifield of gaze. Such findings are unlikelyto be due to orbital factors and could be explained by varying degrees of involvement of rostral midbrain nucleiin the pathological process.
doi:10.1111/j.1749-6632.2011.06120.x
PMCID: PMC3187876  PMID: 21950977
saccades; midbrain; neural integrator; eyeball; parkinsonian disorders
2.  Effects of Cerebellar Disease on Sequences of Rapid Eye Movements 
Vision research  2011;51(9):1064-1074.
Summary
Studying saccades can illuminate the more complex decision-making processes required for everyday movements. The double-step task, in which a target jumps to two successive locations before the subject has time to react, has proven a powerful research tool to investigate the brain’s ability to program sequential responses. We asked how patients with a range of cerebellar disorders responded to the double-step task, specifically, whether the initial saccadic response made to a target is affected by the appearance of a second target jump. We also sought to determine whether cerebellar patients were able to make corrective saccades towards the remembered second target location, if it were turned off soon after presentation. We tested saccades to randomly interleaved single- and double-step target jumps to eight locations on a circle. Patient’s initial responses to double-step stimuli showed 50% more error than saccades to single target jumps, and often, they failed to make a saccade to the first target jump. The presence of a second target jump had similar, but smaller effects in control subjects (error increased by 18%). During memory-guided double-step trials, both patients and controls made corrective saccades in darkness to the remembered location of the second jump. We conclude that in cerebellar patients, the second target jump interferes with programming of the saccade to the first target jump of a double-step stimulus; this defect highlights patients’ impaired ability to respond appropriately to sudden, conflicting changes in their environment. Conversely, since cerebellar patients can make corrective memory-guided saccades in darkness, they retain the ability to remember spatial locations, possibly due to non-retinal neural signals (corollary discharge) from cerebral hemispheric areas concerned with spatial localization.
doi:10.1016/j.visres.2011.02.019
PMCID: PMC3084368  PMID: 21385592
Saccades; double-step; dysmetria; cerebellum, fastigial nucleus; efference copy
3.  The role of the medial longitudinal fasciculus in horizontal gaze: tests of current hypotheses for saccade-vergence interactions 
Rapid shifts of the point of visual fixation between equidistant targets require equal-sized saccades of each eye. The brainstem medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) plays a cardinal role in ensuring that horizontal saccades between equidistant targets are tightly yoked. Lesions of the MLF—internuclear ophthalmoparesis (INO)—cause horizontal saccades to become disjunctive: adducting saccades are slow, small, or absent. However, in INO, convergence movements may remain intact. We studied horizontal gaze shifts between equidistant targets and between far and near targets aligned on the visual axis of one eye (Müller test paradigm) in five cases of INO and five control subjects. We estimated the saccadic component of each movement by measuring peak velocity and peak acceleration. We tested whether the ratio of the saccadic component of the adducting/abducting eyes stayed constant or changed for the two types of saccades. For saccades made by control subjects between equidistant targets, the group mean ratio (±SD) of adducting/abducting peak velocity was 0.96 ± 0.07 and adducting/abducting peak acceleration was 0.94 ± 0.09. Corresponding ratios for INO cases were 0.45 ± 0.10 for peak velocity and 0.27 ± 0.11 for peak acceleration, reflecting reduced saccadic pulses for adduction. For control subjects, during the Müller paradigm, the adducting/abducting ratio was 1.25 ± 0.14 for peak velocity and 1.03 ± 0.12 for peak acceleration. Corresponding ratios for INO cases were 0.82 ± 0.18 for peak velocity and 0.48 ± 0.13 for peak acceleration. When adducting/abducting ratios during Müller versus equidistant targets paradigms were compared, INO cases showed larger relative increases for both peak velocity and peak acceleration compared with control subjects. Comparison of similar-sized movements during the two test paradigms indicated that whereas INO patients could decrease peak velocity of their abducting eye during the Müller paradigm, they were unable to modulate adducting velocity in response to viewing conditions. However, the initial component of each eye’s movement was similar in both cases, possibly reflecting activation of saccadic burst neurons. These findings support the hypothesis that horizontal saccades are governed by disjunctive signals, preceded by an initial, high-acceleration conjugate transient and followed by a slower vergence component.
doi:10.1007/s00221-010-2485-y
PMCID: PMC3039121  PMID: 21082311
Eye movements; Saccades; Vergence; Medial longitudinal fasciculus; Hering’s law; Multiple sclerosis; Internuclear ophthalmoplegia
4.  The Disturbance of Gaze in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: Implications for Pathogenesis 
Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a disease of later life that is currently regarded as a form of neurodegenerative tauopathy. Disturbance of gaze is a cardinal clinical feature of PSP that often helps clinicians to establish the diagnosis. Since the neurobiology of gaze control is now well understood, it is possible to use eye movements as investigational tools to understand aspects of the pathogenesis of PSP. In this review, we summarize each disorder of gaze control that occurs in PSP, drawing on our studies of 50 patients, and on reports from other laboratories that have measured the disturbances of eye movements. When these gaze disorders are approached by considering each functional class of eye movements and its neurobiological basis, a distinct pattern of eye movement deficits emerges that provides insight into the pathogenesis of PSP. Although some aspects of all forms of eye movements are affected in PSP, the predominant defects concern vertical saccades (slow and hypometric, both up and down), impaired vergence, and inability to modulate the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex appropriately for viewing distance. These vertical and vergence eye movements habitually work in concert to enable visuomotor skills that are important during locomotion with the hands free. Taken with the prominent early feature of falls, these findings suggest that PSP tauopathy impairs a recently evolved neural system concerned with bipedal locomotion in an erect posture and frequent gaze shifts between the distant environment and proximate hands. This approach provides a conceptual framework that can be used to address the nosological challenge posed by overlapping clinical and neuropathological features of neurodegenerative tauopathies.
doi:10.3389/fneur.2010.00147
PMCID: PMC3008928  PMID: 21188269
saccades; vergence; vestibular; parkinsonian disorders; tauopathy

Results 1-4 (4)