PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-12 (12)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Vaccine-Induced IgG Antibodies to V1V2 Regions of Multiple HIV-1 Subtypes Correlate with Decreased Risk of HIV-1 Infection 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(2):e87572.
In the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial, IgG antibody (Ab) binding levels to variable regions 1 and 2 (V1V2) of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 were an inverse correlate of risk of HIV-1 infection. To determine if V1V2-specific Abs cross-react with V1V2 from different HIV-1 subtypes, if the nature of the V1V2 antigen used to asses cross-reactivity influenced infection risk, and to identify immune assays for upcoming HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials, new V1V2-scaffold antigens were designed and tested. Protein scaffold antigens carrying the V1V2 regions from HIV-1 subtypes A, B, C, D or CRF01_AE were assayed in pilot studies, and six were selected to assess cross-reactive Abs in the plasma from the original RV144 case-control cohort (41 infected vaccinees, 205 frequency-matched uninfected vaccinees, and 40 placebo recipients) using ELISA and a binding Ab multiplex assay. IgG levels to these antigens were assessed as correlates of risk in vaccine recipients using weighted logistic regression models. Levels of Abs reactive with subtype A, B, C and CRF01_AE V1V2-scaffold antigens were all significant inverse correlates of risk (p-values of 0.0008–0.05; estimated odds ratios of 0.53–0.68 per 1 standard deviation increase). Thus, levels of vaccine-induced IgG Abs recognizing V1V2 regions from multiple HIV-1 subtypes, and presented on different scaffolds, constitute inverse correlates of risk for HIV-1 infection in the RV144 vaccine trial. The V1V2 antigens provide a link between RV144 and upcoming HIV-1 vaccine trials, and identify reagents and methods for evaluating V1V2 Abs as possible correlates of protection against HIV-1 infection.
Trial Registration
ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00223080
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0087572
PMCID: PMC3913641  PMID: 24504509
2.  Transcriptional network predicts viral set point during acute HIV-1 infection 
Background
HIV-1-infected individuals with higher viral set points progress to AIDS more rapidly than those with lower set points. Predicting viral set point early following infection can contribute to our understanding of early control of HIV-1 replication, to predicting long-term clinical outcomes, and to the choice of optimal therapeutic regimens.
Methods
In a longitudinal study of 10 untreated HIV-1-infected patients, we used gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to identify transcriptional networks for viral set point prediction. At each sampling time, a statistical analysis inferred the optimal transcriptional network that best predicted viral set point. We then assessed the accuracy of this transcriptional model by predicting viral set point in an independent cohort of 10 untreated HIV-1-infected patients from Malawi.
Results
The gene network inferred at time of enrollment predicted viral set point 24 weeks later in the independent Malawian cohort with an accuracy of 87.5%. As expected, the predictive accuracy of the networks inferred at later time points was even greater, exceeding 90% after week 4. The composition of the inferred networks was largely conserved between time points. The 12 genes comprising this dynamic signature of viral set point implicated the involvement of two major canonical pathways: interferon signaling (p<0.0003) and membrane fraction (p<0.02). A silico knockout study showed that HLA-DRB1 and C4BPA may contribute to restricting HIV-1 replication.
Conclusions
Longitudinal gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with acute HIV-1 infection can be used to create transcriptional network models to early predict viral set point with a high degree of accuracy.
doi:10.1136/amiajnl-2012-000867
PMCID: PMC3534464  PMID: 22700869
Bioinformatics; HIV; systems biology; immunology; microbiology; HIV; microarray
3.  Co-evolution of a broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibody and founder virus 
Nature  2013;496(7446):469-476.
Current HIV-1 vaccines elicit strain-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies arise in ~20% of HIV-1-infected individuals, and details of their generation could provide a roadmap for effective vaccination. Here we report the isolation, evolution and structure of a broadly neutralizing antibody from an African donor followed from time of infection. The mature antibody, CH103, neutralized ~55% of HIV-1 isolates, and its co-crystal structure with gp120 revealed a novel loop-based mechanism of CD4-binding site recognition. Virus and antibody gene sequencing revealed concomitant virus evolution and antibody maturation. Notably, the CH103-lineage unmutated common ancestor avidly bound the transmitted/founder HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, and evolution of antibody neutralization breadth was preceded by extensive viral diversification in and near the CH103 epitope. These data elucidate the viral and antibody evolution leading to induction of a lineage of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies and provide insights into strategies to elicit similar antibodies via vaccination.
doi:10.1038/nature12053
PMCID: PMC3637846  PMID: 23552890
4.  Influence of HLA-C Expression Level on HIV Control 
Science (New York, N.Y.)  2013;340(6128):87-91.
A variant upstream of human leukocyte antigen C (HLA-C) shows the most significant genome-wide effect on HIV control in European Americans and is also associated with the level of HLA-C expression. We characterized the differential cell surface expression levels of all common HLA-C allotypes and tested directly for effects of HLA-C expression on outcomes of HIV infection in 5243 individuals. Increasing HLA-C expression was associated with protection against multiple outcomes independently of individual HLA allelic effects in both African and European Americans, regardless of their distinct HLA-C frequencies and linkage relationships with HLA-B and HLA-A. Higher HLA-C expression was correlated with increased likelihood of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses and frequency of viral escape mutation. In contrast, high HLA-C expression had a deleterious effect in Crohn’s disease, suggesting a broader influence of HLA expression levels in human disease.
doi:10.1126/science.1232685
PMCID: PMC3784322  PMID: 23559252
5.  Multiple HIV-1-specific IgG3 responses decline during acute HIV-1: implications for detection of incident HIV infection 
AIDS (London, England)  2011;25(17):2089-2097.
Objective
Different HIV-1 antigen specificities appear in sequence after HIV-1 transmission and the immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass responses to HIV antigens are distinct from each other. The initial predominant IgG subclass response to HIV-1 infection consists of IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies with a noted decline in some IgG3 antibodies during acute HIV-1 infection. Thus, we postulate that multiple antigen-specific IgG3 responses may serve as surrogates for the relative time since HIV-1 acquisition.
Design
We determined the magnitude, peak, and half-life of HIV-1 antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies in 41 HIV-1-infected individuals followed longitudinally from acute infection during the first appearance of HIV-1-specific antibodies through approximately 6 months after infection.
Methods
We used quantitative HIV-1-binding antibody multiplex assays and exponential decay models to estimate concentrations of IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to eight different HIV-1 proteins including gp140 Env, gp120 Env, gp41 Env, p66 reverse transcriptase, p31 Integrase, Tat, Nef, and p55 Gag proteins during acute/recent HIV-1 infection.
Results
Among HIV-1-specific IgG3 responses, anti-gp41 IgG3 antibodies were the first to appear. We found that anti-gp41 Env IgG3 and anti-p66 reverse transcriptase IgG3 antibodies, in addition to anti-Gag IgG3 antibodies, each consistently and measurably declined after acute infection, in contrast to the persistent antigen-specific IgG1 responses.
Conclusion
The detailed measurements of the decline in multiple HIV-specific IgG3 responses simultaneous with persistent IgG1 responses during acute and recent HIV-1 infection could serve as markers for detection of incident HIV infection.
doi:10.1097/QAD.0b013e32834b348e
PMCID: PMC3667583  PMID: 21832938
HIV-1 acute infection; HIV-1 incidence; immunoglobulin G subclass
6.  The Development of CD4 Binding Site Antibodies during HIV-1 Infection 
Journal of Virology  2012;86(14):7588-7595.
Broadly neutralizing antibodies to the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of gp120 are generated by some HIV-1-infected individuals, but little is known about the prevalence and evolution of this antibody response during the course of HIV-1 infection. We analyzed the sera of 113 HIV-1 seroconverters from three cohorts for binding to a panel of gp120 core proteins and their corresponding CD4bs knockout mutants. Among sera collected between 99 and 258 weeks post-HIV-1 infection, 88% contained antibodies to the CD4bs and 47% contained antibodies to resurfaced stabilized core (RSC) probes that react preferentially with broadly neutralizing CD4bs antibodies (BNCD4), such as monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) VRC01 and VRC-CH31. Analysis of longitudinal serum samples from a subset of 18 subjects revealed that CD4bs antibodies to gp120 arose within the first 4 to 16 weeks of infection, while the development of RSC-reactive antibodies was more varied, occurring between 10 and 152 weeks post-HIV-1 infection. Despite the presence of these antibodies, serum neutralization mediated by RSC-reactive antibodies was detected in sera from only a few donors infected for more than 3 years. Thus, CD4bs antibodies that bind a VRC01-like epitope are often induced during HIV-1 infection, but the level and potency required to mediate serum neutralization may take years to develop. An improved understanding of the immunological factors associated with the development and maturation of neutralizing CD4bs antibodies during HIV-1 infection may provide insights into the requirements for eliciting this response by vaccination.
doi:10.1128/JVI.00734-12
PMCID: PMC3416294  PMID: 22573869
7.  Initial HIV-1 Antigen-Specific CD8+ T Cells in Acute HIV-1 Infection Inhibit Transmitted/Founder Virus Replication 
Journal of Virology  2012;86(12):6835-6846.
CD8-mediated virus inhibition can be detected in HIV-1-positive subjects who naturally control virus replication. Characterizing the inhibitory function of CD8+ T cells during acute HIV-1 infection (AHI) can elucidate the nature of the CD8+ responses that can be rapidly elicited and that contribute to virus control. We examined the timing and HIV-1 antigen specificity of antiviral CD8+ T cells during AHI. Autologous and heterologous CD8+ T cell antiviral functions were assessed longitudinally during AHI in five donors from the CHAVI 001 cohort using a CD8+ T cell-mediated virus inhibition assay (CD8 VIA) and transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses. Potent CD8+ antiviral responses against heterologous T/F viruses appeared during AHI at the first time point sampled in each of the 5 donors (Fiebig stages 1/2 to 5). Inhibition of an autologous T/F virus was durable to 48 weeks; however, inhibition of heterologous responses declined concurrent with the resolution of viremia. HIV-1 viruses from 6 months postinfection were more resistant to CD8+-mediated virus inhibition than cognate T/F viruses, demonstrating that the virus escapes early from CD8+ T cell-mediated inhibition of virus replication. CD8+ T cell antigen-specific subsets mediated inhibition of T/F virus replication via soluble components, and these soluble responses were stimulated by peptide pools that include epitopes that were shown to drive HIV-1 escape during AHI. These data provide insights into the mechanisms of CD8-mediated virus inhibition and suggest that functional analyses will be important for determining whether similar antigen-specific virus inhibition can be induced by T cell-directed vaccine strategies.
doi:10.1128/JVI.00437-12
PMCID: PMC3393529  PMID: 22514337
8.  A Novel Variant Marking HLA-DP Expression Levels Predicts Recovery from Hepatitis B Virus Infection 
Journal of Virology  2012;86(12):6979-6985.
Variants near the HLA-DP gene show the strongest genome-wide association with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and HBV recovery/persistence in Asians. To test the effect of the HLA-DP region on outcomes to HBV infection, we sequenced the polymorphic HLA-DPB1 and DPA1 coding exons and the corresponding 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTRs) in 662 individuals of European-American and African-American ancestry. The genome-wide association study (GWAS) variant (rs9277535; 550A/G) in the 3′UTR of the HLA-DPB1 gene that associated most significantly with chronic hepatitis B and outcomes to HBV infection in Asians had a marginal effect on HBV recovery in our European- and African-American samples (odds ratio [OR] = 0.39, P = 0.01, combined ethnic groups). However, we identified a novel variant in the HLA-DPB1 3′UTR region, 496A/G (rs9277534), which associated very significantly with HBV recovery in both European and African-American populations (OR = 0.37, P = 0.0001, combined ethnic groups). The 496A/G variant distinguishes the most protective HLA-DPB1 allele (DPB1*04:01) from the most susceptible (DPB1*01:01), whereas 550A/G does not. 496A/G has a stronger effect than any individual HLA-DPB1 or DPA1 allele and any other HLA alleles that showed an association with HBV recovery in our European-American cohort. The 496GG genotype, which confers recessive susceptibility to HBV persistence, also associates in a recessive manner with significantly higher levels of HLA-DP surface protein and transcript level expression in healthy donors, suggesting that differences in expression of HLA-DP may increase the risk of persistent HBV infection.
doi:10.1128/JVI.00406-12
PMCID: PMC3393572  PMID: 22496224
9.  Immune-Correlates Analysis of an HIV-1 Vaccine Efficacy Trial 
The New England Journal of Medicine  2012;366(14):1275-1286.
BACKGROUND
In the RV144 trial, the estimated efficacy of a vaccine regimen against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was 31.2%. We performed a case–control analysis to identify antibody and cellular immune correlates of infection risk.
METHODS
In pilot studies conducted with RV144 blood samples, 17 antibody or cellular assays met prespecified criteria, of which 6 were chosen for primary analysis to determine the roles of T-cell, IgG antibody, and IgA antibody responses in the modulation of infection risk. Assays were performed on samples from 41 vaccinees who became infected and 205 uninfected vaccinees, obtained 2 weeks after final immunization, to evaluate whether immune-response variables predicted HIV-1 infection through 42 months of follow-up.
RESULTS
Of six primary variables, two correlated significantly with infection risk: the binding of IgG antibodies to variable regions 1 and 2 (V1V2) of HIV-1 envelope proteins (Env) correlated inversely with the rate of HIV-1 infection (estimated odds ratio, 0.57 per 1-SD increase; P = 0.02; q = 0.08), and the binding of plasma IgA antibodies to Env correlated directly with the rate of infection (estimated odds ratio, 1.54 per 1-SD increase; P = 0.03; q = 0.08). Neither low levels of V1V2 antibodies nor high levels of Env-specific IgA antibodies were associated with higher rates of infection than were found in the placebo group. Secondary analyses suggested that Env-specific IgA antibodies may mitigate the effects of potentially protective antibodies.
CONCLUSIONS
This immune-correlates study generated the hypotheses that V1V2 antibodies may have contributed to protection against HIV-1 infection, whereas high levels of Env-specific IgA antibodies may have mitigated the effects of protective antibodies. Vaccines that are designed to induce higher levels of V1V2 antibodies and lower levels of Env-specific IgA antibodies than are induced by the RV144 vaccine may have improved efficacy against HIV-1 infection.
doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1113425
PMCID: PMC3371689  PMID: 22475592
10.  Recurrent Signature Patterns in HIV-1 B Clade Envelope Glycoproteins Associated with either Early or Chronic Infections 
PLoS Pathogens  2011;7(9):e1002209.
Here we have identified HIV-1 B clade Envelope (Env) amino acid signatures from early in infection that may be favored at transmission, as well as patterns of recurrent mutation in chronic infection that may reflect common pathways of immune evasion. To accomplish this, we compared thousands of sequences derived by single genome amplification from several hundred individuals that were sampled either early in infection or were chronically infected. Samples were divided at the outset into hypothesis-forming and validation sets, and we used phylogenetically corrected statistical strategies to identify signatures, systematically scanning all of Env. Signatures included single amino acids, glycosylation motifs, and multi-site patterns based on functional or structural groupings of amino acids. We identified signatures near the CCR5 co-receptor-binding region, near the CD4 binding site, and in the signal peptide and cytoplasmic domain, which may influence Env expression and processing. Two signatures patterns associated with transmission were particularly interesting. The first was the most statistically robust signature, located in position 12 in the signal peptide. The second was the loss of an N-linked glycosylation site at positions 413–415; the presence of this site has been recently found to be associated with escape from potent and broad neutralizing antibodies, consistent with enabling a common pathway for immune escape during chronic infection. Its recurrent loss in early infection suggests it may impact fitness at the time of transmission or during early viral expansion. The signature patterns we identified implicate Env expression levels in selection at viral transmission or in early expansion, and suggest that immune evasion patterns that recur in many individuals during chronic infection when antibodies are present can be selected against when the infection is being established prior to the adaptive immune response.
Author Summary
A single virus most often establishes HIV-1 infection. As a consequence, virus sampled early in infection is usually very homogeneous. A few months into the infection, the virus begins to accumulate mutations as it evolves to evade HIV-specific immune responses mounted by the infected host. During chronic infection, the viral population diversifies, reflecting the history of mutations that arose within that infected individual. We hypothesized that particular amino acids might confer a selective advantage during transmission or early infection, and others might recur during chronic infection because they provide common and effective strategies of immune escape. We compared a large number of viral sequences from several hundred infected people sampled soon after transmission or during chronic infection to identify such infection-status “signature” patterns. A particularly robust signature was identified in the signal peptide of Envelope, a region that regulates its expression. Other signatures were found in regions of Envelope that interact with its cellular receptors, or are implicated in immune escape.
doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1002209
PMCID: PMC3182927  PMID: 21980282
11.  Vaginal Submucosal Dendritic Cells, but Not Langerhans Cells, Induce Protective Th1 Responses to Herpes Simplex Virus-2 
Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 infection occurs primarily at the genital mucosal surfaces and is a leading cause of ulcerative lesions. Despite the availability of animal models for HSV-2 infection, little is known regarding the mechanism of immune induction within the vaginal mucosa. Here, we examined the cell types responsible for the initiation of protective Th1 immunity to HSV-2. Intravaginal inoculation of HSV-2 led to a rapid recruitment of submucosal dendritic cells (DCs) to the infected epithelium. Subsequently, CD11c+ DCs harboring viral peptides in the context of MHC class II molecules emerged in the draining lymph nodes and were found to be responsible for the stimulation of IFNγ secretion from HSV-specific CD4+ T cells. Other antigen-presenting cells including B cells and macrophages did not present viral peptides to T cells in the draining lymph nodes. Next, we assessed the relative contribution to immune generation by the Langerhans cells in the vaginal epithelium, the submucosal CD11b+ DCs, and the CD8α+ lymph node DCs. Analysis of these DC populations from the draining lymph nodes revealed that only the CD11b+ submucosal DCs, but not Langerhans cell–derived or CD8α+ DCs, presented viral antigens to CD4+ T cells and induced IFNγ secretion. These results demonstrate a previously unanticipated role for submucosal DCs in the generation of protective Th1 immune responses to HSV-2 in the vaginal mucosa, and suggest their importance in immunity to other sexually transmitted diseases.
doi:10.1084/jem.20021109
PMCID: PMC2193810  PMID: 12538655
genital mucosa; cytokines; lymph node; epithelium; sexually transmitted disease
12.  A Nucleotide Substitution in the tRNALys Primer Binding Site Dramatically Increases Replication of Recombinant Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Containing a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase 
Journal of Virology  2002;76(11):5803-5806.
A recombinant simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) derived from strain 239 (SIVmac239) with reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strain HXB2 was severely impaired for replication. Detectable p27Gag levels were not observed until day 65 and peak p27Gag levels were not reached until day 75 after transfection of CEMx174 cells with the recombinant DNA. Sequences from the latter time point did not contain amino acid substitutions in HIV-1 RT; however, a single nucleotide substitution (thymine to cytosine) was found at position eight of the SIV primer binding site. We engineered an RT/SHIV genome with the thymine-to-cytosine substitution, called RT/SHIV/TC, and observed dramatically faster replication kinetics than were observed with the parental RT/SHIV from which this variant was derived. RT/SHIV/TC provides an improved system for study of the impact of drug resistance mutations in HIV-1 RT in a relevant animal model.
doi:10.1128/JVI.76.11.5803-5806.2002
PMCID: PMC137045  PMID: 11992009

Results 1-12 (12)