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author:("Das, debasis")
1.  Participants’ perceptions and understanding of a malaria clinical trial in Bangladesh 
Malaria Journal  2014;13:217.
Background
Existing evidence suggests that there is often limited understanding among participants in clinical trials about the informed consent process, resulting in their providing consent without really understanding the purpose of the study, specific procedures, and their rights. The objective of the study was to determine the subjects’ understanding of research, perceptions of voluntariness and motivations for participation in a malaria clinical trial.
Methods
In this study semi-structured interviews of adult clinical trial participants with uncomplicated falciparum malaria were conducted in Ramu Upazila Health Complex, in Bangladesh.
Results
Of 16 participants, the vast majority (81%) were illiterate. All subjects had a ‘therapeutic misconception’ i.e. the trial was perceived to be conducted primarily for the benefit of individual patients when in fact the main objective was to provide information to inform public health policy. From the patients’ perspective, getting well from their illness was their major concern. Poor actual understanding of trial specific procedures was reported despite participants’ satisfaction with treatment and nursing care.
Conclusion
There is frequently a degree of overlap between research and provision of clinical care in malaria research studies. Patients may be motivated to participate to research without a good understanding of the principal objectives of the study despite a lengthy consent process. The findings suggest that use of a standard consent form following the current ICH-GCP guidelines does not result in achieving fully informed consent and the process should be revised, simplified and adapted to individual trial settings.
doi:10.1186/1475-2875-13-217
PMCID: PMC4055798  PMID: 24893933
Consent; Ethics; Clinical trials; Bangladesh; Malaria
2.  Differential systemic gene expression profile in patients with diabetic macular edema: Responders versus nonresponders to standard treatment 
Introduction:
Diabetic macular edema (DME) is a vision-threatening complication of diabetic retinopathy. The current practice of management is a trial and error method of using intravitreal antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)” or steroids to treat the patient and watch the response. However, if the patient's genetic profile helps us choose appropriate medicine, it would help customize treatment option for each patient. This forms the basis of our study.
Materials and Methods:
A case-control, prospective, observational series, where DME patients were treated with bevacizumab and subclassified as treatment naοve, treatment responders, and treatment nonresponders. Blood samples of 20 subjects were studied, with five patients in each of the groups (nondiabetic- group 1, treatment naοve- group 2, treatment responder- group 3, and treatment nonresponder-group 4). Whole blood RNA extraction followed by labeling, amplification and hybridization was done, and microarray data analyzed. Genes were classified based on functional category and pathways.
Results:
The total number of genes upregulated among all three experimental groups was 5, whereas 105 genes were downregulated. There were no common genes upregulated between the responders and nonresponders. There was only one gene upregulated between the diabetic and diabetic responders posttreatment. There were 19 genes upregulated and 8 genes downregulated in the inflammatory pathway in group 2 versus group 1. There were no downregulated genes detected in vascular angiogenesis and transcription group. There were identical numbers of genes up- and downregulated in the inflammatory pathway. Seventeen genes were upreguated and 11 genes downregulated in receptor activity, which remained the predominant group in the group classification.
Discussion:
In summary, this study would provide an insight into the probable signaling mechanisms for disease pathogenesis as well as progression. This type of study eventually would aid in developing or improvising existing treatment modules with a rational approach towards personalized medicine, in future addressing the differential responses to treatment.
doi:10.4103/0301-4738.126186
PMCID: PMC3955073  PMID: 24492504
Bevacizumab; diabetic macular edema; gene expression profile; microarray analysis
3.  Genome-wide association study in people of South Asian ancestry identifies six novel susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes 
Nature genetics  2011;43(10):984-989.
We carried out a genome wide association study of type-2 diabetes (T2D) amongst 20,119 people of South Asian ancestry (5,561 with T2D); we identified 20 independent SNPs associated with T2D at P<10−4 for testing amongst a further 38,568 South Asians (13,170 with T2D). In combined analysis, common genetic variants at six novel loci (GRB14, ST6GAL1, VPS26A, HMG20A, AP3S2 and HNF4A) were associated with T2D (P=4.1×10−8 to P=1.9×10−11); SNPs at GRB14 were also associated with insulin sensitivity, and at ST6GAL1 and HNF4A with pancreatic beta-cell function respectively. Our findings provide additional insight into mechanisms underlying T2D, and demonstrate the potential for new discovery from genetic association studies in South Asians who have increased susceptibility to T2D.
doi:10.1038/ng.921
PMCID: PMC3773920  PMID: 21874001
4.  Early parasitological response following artemisinin-containing regimens: a critical review of the literature 
Malaria Journal  2013;12:125.
Background
Parasitaemia on Day 3 has been proposed as a useful alert of potential artemisinin resistance, however, the normal variation of parasite clearance observed in artemisinin-based combination therapy clinical trials is poorly documented.
Methods
The trends in early parasitological response following treatment with an artemisinin anti-malarial regimen were reviewed. A PubMed literature search identified all studies using an artemisinin regimen for uncomplicated falciparum malaria published between January 2000 and December 2011. Data from clinical studies were extracted for analysis using a standardized questionnaire.
Results
In total 65,078 patients were enrolled into 213 clinical trials with 413 treatment arms containing either an artemisinin derivative alone (n=26) or in combination with a partner drug (n=387). The proportion of patients remaining parasitaemic at 24, 48 and 72 hours was documented in 115 (28%), 167 (40%) and 153 (37%) treatment arms, respectively. Excluding resistance studies in Cambodia, the median proportion of patients still parasitaemic was 53.8% [range 3–95, IQR=30.5-69.2] on Day 1, 6% [range 0–65.9, IQR=2-11.5] on Day 2 and 0 [range 0–12.6, IQR=0-2] on Day 3. Comparing studies from 2000 to 2005 and 2006 to 2011, the median proportion of patients reported to remain parasitaemic at 72 hours decreased in Africa (1.2% vs 0%, p=0.007), but increased in Asia (0.4% vs 3.9%, p=0.076). In 95% of studies the proportion of patients with peripheral parasitaemia was less than 6% at 72 hours.
Conclusions
These results highlight the normal distribution of early parasitological responses following ACT, and the influence that heterogeneity in study design, host and parasite factors have in confounding a surveillance system based on Day 3 parasite positivity. Greater understanding of factors influencing parasite clearance is crucial, but will require analysis of pooled data from individual patient records.
doi:10.1186/1475-2875-12-125
PMCID: PMC3649884  PMID: 23602021
Artemisinins; Malaria; Plasmodium falciparum; Resistance
5.  Seventy-five genetic loci influencing the human red blood cell 
van der Harst, Pim | Zhang, Weihua | Leach, Irene Mateo | Rendon, Augusto | Verweij, Niek | Sehmi, Joban | Paul, Dirk S. | Elling, Ulrich | Allayee, Hooman | Li, Xinzhong | Radhakrishnan, Aparna | Tan, Sian-Tsung | Voss, Katrin | Weichenberger, Christian X. | Albers, Cornelis A. | Al-Hussani, Abtehale | Asselbergs, Folkert W. | Ciullo, Marina | Danjou, Fabrice | Dina, Christian | Esko, Tõnu | Evans, David M. | Franke, Lude | Gögele, Martin | Hartiala, Jaana | Hersch, Micha | Holm, Hilma | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Kanoni, Stavroula | Kleber, Marcus E. | Lagou, Vasiliki | Langenberg, Claudia | Lopez, Lorna M. | Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka | Melander, Olle | Murgia, Federico | Nolte, Ilja M. | O’Reilly, Paul F. | Padmanabhan, Sandosh | Parsa, Afshin | Pirastu, Nicola | Porcu, Eleonora | Portas, Laura | Prokopenko, Inga | Ried, Janina S. | Shin, So-Youn | Tang, Clara S. | Teumer, Alexander | Traglia, Michela | Ulivi, Sheila | Westra, Harm-Jan | Yang, Jian | Zhao, Jing Hua | Anni, Franco | Abdellaoui, Abdel | Attwood, Antony | Balkau, Beverley | Bandinelli, Stefania | Bastardot, François | Benyamin, Beben | Boehm, Bernhard O. | Cookson, William O. | Das, Debashish | de Bakker, Paul I. W. | de Boer, Rudolf A. | de Geus, Eco J. C. | de Moor, Marleen H. | Dimitriou, Maria | Domingues, Francisco S. | Döring, Angela | Engström, Gunnar | Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi | Ferrucci, Luigi | Fischer, Krista | Galanello, Renzo | Garner, Stephen F. | Genser, Bernd | Gibson, Quince D. | Girotto, Giorgia | Gudbjartsson, Daniel Fannar | Harris, Sarah E. | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Hastie, Claire E. | Hedblad, Bo | Illig, Thomas | Jolley, Jennifer | Kähönen, Mika | Kema, Ido P. | Kemp, John P. | Liang, Liming | Lloyd-Jones, Heather | Loos, Ruth J. F. | Meacham, Stuart | Medland, Sarah E. | Meisinger, Christa | Memari, Yasin | Mihailov, Evelin | Miller, Kathy | Moffatt, Miriam F. | Nauck, Matthias | Novatchkova, Maria | Nutile, Teresa | Olafsson, Isleifur | Onundarson, Pall T. | Parracciani, Debora | Penninx, Brenda W. | Perseu, Lucia | Piga, Antonio | Pistis, Giorgio | Pouta, Anneli | Puc, Ursula | Raitakari, Olli | Ring, Susan M. | Robino, Antonietta | Ruggiero, Daniela | Ruokonen, Aimo | Saint-Pierre, Aude | Sala, Cinzia | Salumets, Andres | Sambrook, Jennifer | Schepers, Hein | Schmidt, Carsten Oliver | Silljé, Herman H. W. | Sladek, Rob | Smit, Johannes H. | Starr, John M. | Stephens, Jonathan | Sulem, Patrick | Tanaka, Toshiko | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Tragante, Vinicius | van Gilst, Wiek H. | van Pelt, L. Joost | van Veldhuisen, Dirk J. | Völker, Uwe | Whitfield, John B. | Willemsen, Gonneke | Winkelmann, Bernhard R. | Wirnsberger, Gerald | Algra, Ale | Cucca, Francesco | d’Adamo, Adamo Pio | Danesh, John | Deary, Ian J. | Dominiczak, Anna F. | Elliott, Paul | Fortina, Paolo | Froguel, Philippe | Gasparini, Paolo | Greinacher, Andreas | Hazen, Stanley L. | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Khaw, Kay Tee | Lehtimäki, Terho | Maerz, Winfried | Martin, Nicholas G. | Metspalu, Andres | Mitchell, Braxton D. | Montgomery, Grant W. | Moore, Carmel | Navis, Gerjan | Pirastu, Mario | Pramstaller, Peter P. | Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro | Schadt, Eric | Scott, James | Shuldiner, Alan R. | Smith, George Davey | Smith, J. Gustav | Snieder, Harold | Sorice, Rossella | Spector, Tim D. | Stefansson, Kari | Stumvoll, Michael | Wilson Tang, W. H. | Toniolo, Daniela | Tönjes, Anke | Visscher, Peter M. | Vollenweider, Peter | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R. | Boomsma, Dorret I. | Beckmann, Jacques S. | Dedoussis, George V. | Deloukas, Panos | Ferreira, Manuel A. | Sanna, Serena | Uda, Manuela | Hicks, Andrew A. | Penninger, Josef Martin | Gieger, Christian | Kooner, Jaspal S. | Ouwehand, Willem H. | Soranzo, Nicole | Chambers, John C
Nature  2012;492(7429):369-375.
Anaemia is a chief determinant of globalill health, contributing to cognitive impairment, growth retardation and impaired physical capacity. To understand further the genetic factors influencing red blood cells, we carried out a genome-wide association study of haemoglobin concentration and related parameters in up to 135,367 individuals. Here we identify 75 independent genetic loci associated with one or more red blood cell phenotypes at P <10−8, which together explain 4–9% of the phenotypic variance per trait. Using expression quantitative trait loci and bioinformatic strategies, we identify 121 candidate genes enriched in functions relevant to red blood cell biology. The candidate genes are expressed preferentially in red blood cell precursors, and 43 have haematopoietic phenotypes in Mus musculus or Drosophila melanogaster. Through open-chromatin and coding-variant analyses we identify potential causal genetic variants at 41 loci. Our findings provide extensive new insights into genetic mechanisms and biological pathways controlling red blood cell formation and function.
doi:10.1038/nature11677
PMCID: PMC3623669  PMID: 23222517
6.  Effect of High-Dose or Split-Dose Artesunate on Parasite Clearance in Artemisinin-Resistant Falciparum Malaria 
New treatment strategies are needed for artemisinin-resistant falciparum malaria. This randomized trial shows that neither increasing nor splitting the standard once-daily artesunate dose reverses the markedly reduced parasite clearance rate in patients with artemisinin-resistant falciparum malaria.
Background. The emergence of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinins on the Cambodian and Myanmar-Thai borders poses severe threats to malaria control. We investigated whether increasing or splitting the dose of the short-half-life drug artesunate improves parasite clearance in falciparum malaria in the 2 regions.
Methods. In Pailin, western Cambodia (from 2008 to 2010), and Wang Pha, northwestern Thailand (2009–2010), patients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria were randomized to oral artesunate 6 mg/kg/d as a once-daily or twice-daily dose for 7 days, or artesunate 8 mg/kg/d as a once-daily or twice-daily dose for 3 days, followed by mefloquine. Parasite clearance and recrudescence for up to 63 days of follow-up were assessed.
Results. A total of 159 patients were enrolled. Overall median (interquartile range [IQR]) parasitemia half-life (half-life) was 6.03 (4.89–7.28) hours in Pailin versus 3.42 (2.20–4.85) hours in Wang Pha (P = .0001). Splitting or increasing the artesunate dose did not shorten half-life in either site. Pharmacokinetic profiles of artesunate and dihydroartemisinin were similar between sites and did not correlate with half-life. Recrudescent infections occurred in 4 of 79 patients in Pailin and 5 of 80 in Wang Pha and was not different between treatment arms (P = .68).
Conclusions. Increasing the artesunate treatment dose up to 8 mg/kg/d or splitting the dose does not improve parasite clearance in either artemisinin resistant or more sensitive infections with P. falciparum.
Clinical Trials Registration. ISRCTN15351875.
doi:10.1093/cid/cis958
PMCID: PMC3563392  PMID: 23175556
artemisinins; drug resistance; Plasmodium falciparum; neutropenia; reticulocytopenia
7.  Artemisinin Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum Malaria 
The New England journal of medicine  2009;361(5):455-467.
BACKGROUND
Artemisinin-based combination therapies are the recommended first-line treatments of falciparum malaria in all countries with endemic disease. There are recent concerns that the efficacy of such therapies has declined on the Thai–Cambodian border, historically a site of emerging antimalarial-drug resistance.
METHODS
In two open-label, randomized trials, we compared the efficacies of two treatments for uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Pailin, western Cambodia, and Wang Pha, northwestern Thailand: oral artesunate given at a dose of 2 mg per kilogram of body weight per day, for 7 days, and artesunate given at a dose of 4 mg per kilogram per day, for 3 days, followed by mefloquine at two doses totaling 25 mg per kilogram. We assessed in vitro and in vivo Plasmodium falciparum susceptibility, artesunate pharmacokinetics, and molecular markers of resistance.
RESULTS
We studied 40 patients in each of the two locations. The overall median parasite clearance times were 84 hours (interquartile range, 60 to 96) in Pailin and 48 hours (interquartile range, 36 to 66) in Wang Pha (P<0.001). Recrudescence confirmed by means of polymerase-chain-reaction assay occurred in 6 of 20 patients (30%) receiving artesunate monotherapy and 1 of 20 (5%) receiving artesunate–mefloquine therapy in Pailin, as compared with 2 of 20 (10%) and 1 of 20 (5%), respectively, in Wang Pha (P = 0.31). These markedly different parasitologic responses were not explained by differences in age, artesunate or dihydroartemisinin pharmacokinetics, results of isotopic in vitro sensitivity tests, or putative molecular correlates of P. falciparum drug resistance (mutations or amplifications of the gene encoding a multidrug resistance protein [PfMDR1] or mutations in the gene encoding sarco–endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase6 [PfSERCA]). Adverse events were mild and did not differ significantly between the two treatment groups.
CONCLUSIONS
P. falciparum has reduced in vivo susceptibility to artesunate in western Cambodia as compared with northwestern Thailand. Resistance is characterized by slow parasite clearance in vivo without corresponding reductions on conventional in vitro susceptibility testing. Containment measures are urgently needed. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00493363, and Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN64835265.)
doi:10.1056/NEJMoa0808859
PMCID: PMC3495232  PMID: 19641202
8.  Genome-wide association study identifies loci influencing concentrations of liver enzymes in plasma 
Chambers, John C | Zhang, Weihua | Sehmi, Joban | Li, Xinzhong | Wass, Mark N | Van der Harst, Pim | Holm, Hilma | Sanna, Serena | Kavousi, Maryam | Baumeister, Sebastian E | Coin, Lachlan J | Deng, Guohong | Gieger, Christian | Heard-Costa, Nancy L | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Kühnel, Brigitte | Kumar, Vinod | Lagou, Vasiliki | Liang, Liming | Luan, Jian’an | Vidal, Pedro Marques | Leach, Irene Mateo | O’Reilly, Paul F | Peden, John F | Rahmioglu, Nilufer | Soininen, Pasi | Speliotes, Elizabeth K | Yuan, Xin | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Alizadeh, Behrooz Z | Atwood, Larry D | Borecki, Ingrid B | Brown, Morris J | Charoen, Pimphen | Cucca, Francesco | Das, Debashish | de Geus, Eco J C | Dixon, Anna L | Döring, Angela | Ehret, Georg | Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur I | Farrall, Martin | Forouhi, Nita G | Friedrich, Nele | Goessling, Wolfram | Gudbjartsson, Daniel F | Harris, Tamara B | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Heath, Simon | Hirschfield, Gideon M | Hofman, Albert | Homuth, Georg | Hyppönen, Elina | Janssen, Harry L A | Johnson, Toby | Kangas, Antti J | Kema, Ido P | Kühn, Jens P | Lai, Sandra | Lathrop, Mark | Lerch, Markus M | Li, Yun | Liang, T Jake | Lin, Jing-Ping | Loos, Ruth J F | Martin, Nicholas G | Moffatt, Miriam F | Montgomery, Grant W | Munroe, Patricia B | Musunuru, Kiran | Nakamura, Yusuke | O’Donnell, Christopher J | Olafsson, Isleifur | Penninx, Brenda W | Pouta, Anneli | Prins, Bram P | Prokopenko, Inga | Puls, Ralf | Ruokonen, Aimo | Savolainen, Markku J | Schlessinger, David | Schouten, Jeoffrey N L | Seedorf, Udo | Sen-Chowdhry, Srijita | Siminovitch, Katherine A | Smit, Johannes H | Spector, Timothy D | Tan, Wenting | Teslovich, Tanya M | Tukiainen, Taru | Uitterlinden, Andre G | Van der Klauw, Melanie M | Vasan, Ramachandran S | Wallace, Chris | Wallaschofski, Henri | Wichmann, H-Erich | Willemsen, Gonneke | Würtz, Peter | Xu, Chun | Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M | Abecasis, Goncalo R | Ahmadi, Kourosh R | Boomsma, Dorret I | Caulfield, Mark | Cookson, William O | van Duijn, Cornelia M | Froguel, Philippe | Matsuda, Koichi | McCarthy, Mark I | Meisinger, Christa | Mooser, Vincent | Pietiläinen, Kirsi H | Schumann, Gunter | Snieder, Harold | Sternberg, Michael J E | Stolk, Ronald P | Thomas, Howard C | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Uda, Manuela | Waeber, Gérard | Wareham, Nicholas J | Waterworth, Dawn M | Watkins, Hugh | Whitfield, John B | Witteman, Jacqueline C M | Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R | Fox, Caroline S | Ala-Korpela, Mika | Stefansson, Kari | Vollenweider, Peter | Völzke, Henry | Schadt, Eric E | Scott, James | Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Elliott, Paul | Kooner, Jaspal S
Nature genetics  2011;43(11):1131-1138.
Concentrations of liver enzymes in plasma are widely used as indicators of liver disease. We carried out a genome-wide association study in 61,089 individuals, identifying 42 loci associated with concentrations of liver enzymes in plasma, of which 32 are new associations (P = 10−8 to P = 10−190). We used functional genomic approaches including metabonomic profiling and gene expression analyses to identify probable candidate genes at these regions. We identified 69 candidate genes, including genes involved in biliary transport (ATP8B1 and ABCB11), glucose, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism (FADS1, FADS2, GCKR, JMJD1C, HNF1A, MLXIPL, PNPLA3, PPP1R3B, SLC2A2 and TRIB1), glycoprotein biosynthesis and cell surface glycobiology (ABO, ASGR1, FUT2, GPLD1 and ST3GAL4), inflammation and immunity (CD276, CDH6, GCKR, HNF1A, HPR, ITGA1, RORA and STAT4) and glutathione metabolism (GSTT1, GSTT2 and GGT), as well as several genes of uncertain or unknown function (including ABHD12, EFHD1, EFNA1, EPHA2, MICAL3 and ZNF827). Our results provide new insight into genetic mechanisms and pathways influencing markers of liver function.
doi:10.1038/ng.970
PMCID: PMC3482372  PMID: 22001757
10.  High heritability of malaria parasite clearance rate indicates a genetic basis for artemisinin resistance in Western Cambodia 
The Journal of infectious diseases  2010;201(9):1326-1330.
In Western Cambodia malaria parasites clear slowly from the blood following treatment with artemisinin derivatives, but it is unclear whether this results from parasite, host, or other factors specific to this population. We measured heritability of clearance rate (CR), by examining patients infected with identical or non-identical parasite genotypes, using methods analogous to human twin studies. A substantial proportion (56-58%) of the variation in CR is explained by parasite genetics. This has two important implications: (1) selection with artemisinin derivatives will tend to drive resistance spread, (2) because heritability is high, genes underlying CR may be identified by genome-wide association.
doi:10.1086/651562
PMCID: PMC2853733  PMID: 20350192
Artemisinin; clearance time; heritability; twin studies; resistance; microsatellite
11.  Exploring the Contribution of Candidate Genes to Artemisinin Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum▿  
The reduced in vivo sensitivity of Plasmodium falciparum has recently been confirmed in western Cambodia. Identifying molecular markers for artemisinin resistance is essential for monitoring the spread of the resistant phenotype and identifying the mechanisms of resistance. Four candidate genes, including the P. falciparum mdr1 (pfmdr1) gene, the P. falciparum ATPase6 (pfATPase6) gene, the 6-kb mitochondrial genome, and ubp-1, encoding a deubiquitinating enzyme, of artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum strains from western Cambodia were examined and compared to those of sensitive strains from northwestern Thailand, where the artemisinins are still very effective. The artemisinin-resistant phenotype did not correlate with pfmdr1 amplification or mutations (full-length sequencing), mutations in pfATPase6 (full-length sequencing) or the 6-kb mitochondrial genome (full-length sequencing), or ubp-1 mutations at positions 739 and 770. The P. falciparum CRT K76T mutation was present in all isolates from both study sites. The pfmdr1 copy numbers in western Cambodia were significantly lower in parasite samples obtained in 2007 than in those obtained in 2005, coinciding with a local change in drug policy replacing artesunate-mefloquine with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine. Artemisinin resistance in western Cambodia is not linked to candidate genes, as was suggested by earlier studies.
doi:10.1128/AAC.00032-10
PMCID: PMC2897287  PMID: 20421395
12.  The efficacy of playing a virtual reality game in modulating pain for children with acute burn injuries: A randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN87413556] 
BMC Pediatrics  2005;5:1.
Background
The management of burn injuries is reported as painful, distressing and a cause of anxiety in children and their parents. Child's and parents' pain and anxiety, often contributes to extended time required for burns management procedures, in particular the process of changing dressings. The traditional method of pharmacologic analgesia is often insufficient to cover the burnt child's pain, and it can have deleterious side effects [1,2]. Intervention with Virtual Reality (VR) games is based on distraction or interruption in the way current thoughts, including pain, are processed by the brain. Research on adults supports the hypothesis that virtual reality has a positive influence on burns pain modulation.
Methods
This study investigates whether playing a virtual reality game, decreases procedural pain in children aged 5–18 years with acute burn injuries. The paper reports on the findings of a pilot study, a randomised trial, in which seven children acted as their own controls though a series of 11 trials. Outcomes were pain measured using the self-report Faces Scale and findings of interviews with parent/carer and nurses.
Results
The average pain scores (from the Faces Scale) for pharmacological analgesia only was, 4.1 (SD 2.9), while VR coupled with pharmacological analgesia, the average pain score was 1.3 (SD 1.8)
Conclusion
The study provides strong evidence supporting VR based games in providing analgesia with minimal side effects and little impact on the physical hospital environment, as well as its reusability and versatility, suggesting another option in the management of children's acute pain.
doi:10.1186/1471-2431-5-1
PMCID: PMC554986  PMID: 15745448

Results 1-12 (12)