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1.  Abiraterone and Increased Survival in Metastatic Prostate Cancer 
The New England journal of medicine  2011;364(21):1995-2005.
BACKGROUND
Biosynthesis of extragonadal androgen may contribute to the progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer. We evaluated whether abiraterone acetate, an inhibitor of androgen biosynthesis, prolongs overall survival among patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer who have received chemotherapy.
METHODS
We randomly assigned, in a 2:1 ratio, 1195 patients who had previously received docetaxel to receive 5 mg of prednisone twice daily with either 1000 mg of abiraterone acetate (797 patients) or placebo (398 patients). The primary end point was overall survival. The secondary end points included time to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression (elevation in the PSA level according to prespecified criteria), progression-free survival according to radiologic findings based on prespecified criteria, and the PSA response rate.
RESULTS
After a median follow-up of 12.8 months, overall survival was longer in the abiraterone acetate–prednisone group than in the placebo–prednisone group (14.8 months vs. 10.9 months; hazard ratio, 0.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.54 to 0.77; P<0.001). Data were unblinded at the interim analysis, since these results exceeded the preplanned criteria for study termination. All secondary end points, including time to PSA progression (10.2 vs. 6.6 months; P<0.001), progression-free survival (5.6 months vs. 3.6 months; P<0.001), and PSA response rate (29% vs. 6%, P<0.001), favored the treatment group. Mineralocorticoid-related adverse events, including fluid retention, hypertension, and hypokalemia, were more frequently reported in the abiraterone acetate–prednisone group than in the placebo–prednisone group.
CONCLUSIONS
The inhibition of androgen biosynthesis by abiraterone acetate prolonged overall survival among patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer who previously received chemotherapy. (Funded by Cougar Biotechnology; COU-AA-301 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00638690.)
doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1014618
PMCID: PMC3471149  PMID: 21612468
2.  Phase III Trial Assessing Bevacizumab in Stages II and III Carcinoma of the Colon: Results of NSABP Protocol C-08 
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2010;29(1):11-16.
Purpose
The National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project C-08 trial was designed to investigate the safety and efficacy of adding bevacizumab to modified FOLFOX6 (mFOLFOX6; ie, infusional/bolus fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin) for the adjuvant treatment of patients with stages II to III colon cancer.
Methods
Patients received mFOLFOX6 every 2 weeks for 26 weeks alone or modified as FOLFOX6 + bevacizumab (5 mg/kg every 2 weeks for 52 weeks [ie, experimental group]). The primary end point was disease-free survival (DFS).
Results
Among 2,672 analyzed patients, demographic factors were well balanced by treatment. With a median follow-up of 35.6 months, the addition of bevacizumab to mFOLFOX6 did not result in an overall significant increase in DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.89; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.04; P = .15). The point estimates for 3-year DFS for the overall population were 77.4% and 75.5% for the experimental and control arms, respectively. For patients with stages II and III diseases, these same estimates were 87.4% and 84.7%, respectively, for stage II and 74.2% and 72.4%, respectively, for stage III. Exploratory analyses found that the effect of bevacizumab on DFS was different before and after a 15-month landmark (time-by-treatment interaction P value < .0001). Bevacizumab had a strong effect before the landmark (HR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.48 to 0.78; P < .001) but no significant effect after (HR, 1.22; 95% CI, 0.98 to 1.52; P = .076).
Conclusion
Bevacizumab for 1 year with mFOLFOX6 does not significantly prolong DFS in stages II and III colon cancer. However, a significant but transient effect during bevacizumab exposure was observed in the experimental arm. We postulate that this observation reflects a biologic effect during bevacizumab exposure. Given the lack of improvement in DFS, the use of bevacizumab cannot be recommended for use in the adjuvant treatment of patients with colon cancer.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2010.30.0855
PMCID: PMC3055856  PMID: 20940184
3.  Initial Safety Report of NSABP C-08: A Randomized Phase III Study of Modified FOLFOX6 With or Without Bevacizumab for the Adjuvant Treatment of Patients With Stage II or III Colon Cancer 
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2009;27(20):3385-3390.
Purpose
The National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project C-08 trial was designed to investigate the safety and effectiveness of adding bevacizumab to modified infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) 6 regimen for the adjuvant treatment of patients with stage II or III colon cancer. We present safety information in advance of the planned analysis of efficacy.
Patients and Methods
Among 2,710 randomly assigned patients, demographic factors were balanced. Patients received modified FOLFOX6 every 2 weeks × 12 or modified FOLFOX6 plus bevacizumab (5 mg/kg every 2 weeks × 26, experimental group).
Results
Overall rates of grade 4 or 5 toxicities were nearly identical in the FOLFOX6 and FOLFOX6 plus bevacizumab arms (15.2% and 15.0%, respectively). Six-month mortality rates were 0.96% and 0.90% for the control and experimental groups, respectively. Grade 3+ toxicities that occurred more often in the experimental arm versus control arm included hypertension (12% v 1.8%, respectively), wound complications (abdominal incisional hernia or infusion port dehiscence/inflammation; 1.7% v 0.3%, respectively), pain (11.1% v 6.3%, respectively), and proteinuria (2.7% v 0.8%, respectively). Grade 2+ neuropathy was increased in the experimental arm versus the control arm (grade 2, 33% v 29%, respectively; grade 3, 16% v 14%, respectively; and grade 4, < 1% each). In the experimental arm versus control arm, significantly less thrombocytopenia (1.4% v 3.4%, respectively) and fewer allergic reactions (3.1% v 4.7%, respectively) were observed. Advanced age was associated with a significantly greater rate of grade 4 and 5 toxicities regardless of treatment.
Conclusion
Bevacizumab with modified FOLFOX6 is well tolerated in the surgical adjuvant setting in these patients. No significant increase in GI perforation, hemorrhage, arterial or venous thrombotic events, or death with the addition of bevacizumab to modified FOLFOX6 has been observed. Follow-up for potential delayed adverse effects and efficacy is ongoing.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2009.21.9220
PMCID: PMC2717026  PMID: 19414665

Results 1-3 (3)