PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-25 (37)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Development and Validation of Fluorescence-Based and Automated Patch Clamp–Based Functional Assays for the Inward Rectifier Potassium Channel Kir4.1 
Abstract
The inward rectifier potassium (Kir) channel Kir4.1 plays essential roles in modulation of neurotransmission and renal sodium transport and may represent a novel drug target for temporal lobe epilepsy and hypertension. The molecular pharmacology of Kir4.1 is limited to neurological drugs, such as fluoxetine (Prozac©), exhibiting weak and nonspecific activity toward the channel. The development of potent and selective small-molecule probes would provide critically needed tools for exploring the integrative physiology and therapeutic potential of Kir4.1. A fluorescence-based thallium (Tl+) flux assay that utilizes a tetracycline-inducible T-Rex-HEK293-Kir4.1 cell line to enable high-throughput screening (HTS) of small-molecule libraries was developed. The assay is dimethyl sulfoxide tolerant and exhibits robust screening statistics (Z′=0.75±0.06). A pilot screen of 3,655 small molecules and lipids revealed 16 Kir4.1 inhibitors (0.4% hit rate). 3,3-Diphenyl-N-(1-phenylethyl)propan-1-amine, termed VU717, inhibits Kir4.1-mediated thallium flux with an IC50 of ∼6 μM. An automated patch clamp assay using the IonFlux HT workbench was developed to facilitate compound characterization. Leak-subtracted ensemble “loose patch” recordings revealed robust tetracycline-inducible and Kir4.1 currents that were inhibited by fluoxetine (IC50=10 μM), VU717 (IC50=6 μM), and structurally related calcium channel blocker prenylamine (IC50=6 μM). Finally, we demonstrate that VU717 inhibits Kir4.1 channel activity in cultured rat astrocytes, providing proof-of-concept that the Tl+ flux and IonFlux HT assays can enable the discovery of antagonists that are active against native Kir4.1 channels.
doi:10.1089/adt.2013.544
PMCID: PMC3870600  PMID: 24266659
2.  Discovery and Characterization of a Potent and Selective Inhibitor of Aedes aegypti Inward Rectifier Potassium Channels 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(11):e110772.
Vector-borne diseases such as dengue fever and malaria, which are transmitted by infected female mosquitoes, affect nearly half of the world's population. The emergence of insecticide-resistant mosquito populations is reducing the effectiveness of conventional insecticides and threatening current vector control strategies, which has created an urgent need to identify new molecular targets against which novel classes of insecticides can be developed. We previously demonstrated that small molecule inhibitors of mammalian Kir channels represent promising chemicals for new mosquitocide development. In this study, high-throughput screening of approximately 30,000 chemically diverse small-molecules was employed to discover potent and selective inhibitors of Aedes aegypti Kir1 (AeKir1) channels heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells. Of 283 confirmed screening ‘hits’, the small-molecule inhibitor VU625 was selected for lead optimization and in vivo studies based on its potency and selectivity toward AeKir1, and tractability for medicinal chemistry. In patch clamp electrophysiology experiments of HEK293 cells, VU625 inhibits AeKir1 with an IC50 value of 96.8 nM, making VU625 the most potent inhibitor of AeKir1 described to date. Furthermore, electrophysiology experiments in Xenopus oocytes revealed that VU625 is a weak inhibitor of AeKir2B. Surprisingly, injection of VU625 failed to elicit significant effects on mosquito behavior, urine excretion, or survival. However, when co-injected with probenecid, VU625 inhibited the excretory capacity of mosquitoes and was toxic, suggesting that the compound is a substrate of organic anion and/or ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. The dose-toxicity relationship of VU625 (when co-injected with probenecid) is biphasic, which is consistent with the molecule inhibiting both AeKir1 and AeKir2B with different potencies. This study demonstrates proof-of-concept that potent and highly selective inhibitors of mosquito Kir channels can be developed using conventional drug discovery approaches. Furthermore, it reinforces the notion that the physical and chemical properties that determine a compound's bioavailability in vivo will be critical in determining the efficacy of Kir channel inhibitors as insecticides.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0110772
PMCID: PMC4222822  PMID: 25375326
3.  Cellular manganese content is developmentally regulated in human dopaminergic neurons 
Scientific Reports  2014;4:6801.
Manganese (Mn) is both an essential biological cofactor and neurotoxicant. Disruption of Mn biology in the basal ganglia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, such as parkinsonism and Huntington's disease. Handling of other essential metals (e.g. iron and zinc) occurs via complex intracellular signaling networks that link metal detection and transport systems. However, beyond several non-selective transporters, little is known about the intracellular processes regulating neuronal Mn homeostasis. We hypothesized that small molecules that modulate intracellular Mn could provide insight into cell-level Mn regulatory mechanisms. We performed a high throughput screen of 40,167 small molecules for modifiers of cellular Mn content in a mouse striatal neuron cell line. Following stringent validation assays and chemical informatics, we obtained a chemical ‘toolbox' of 41 small molecules with diverse structure-activity relationships that can alter intracellular Mn levels under biologically relevant Mn exposures. We utilized this toolbox to test for differential regulation of Mn handling in human floor-plate lineage dopaminergic neurons, a lineage especially vulnerable to environmental Mn exposure. We report differential Mn accumulation between developmental stages and stage-specific differences in the Mn-altering activity of individual small molecules. This work demonstrates cell-level regulation of Mn content across neuronal differentiation.
doi:10.1038/srep06801
PMCID: PMC4210885  PMID: 25348053
4.  Dihydrothiazolopyridone Derivatives as a Novel Family of Positive Allosteric Modulators of the Metabotropic Glutamate 5 (mGlu5) Receptor 
Journal of medicinal chemistry  2013;56(18):7243-7259.
Starting from a singleton chromanone high throughput screening (HTS) hit, we describe a focused medicinal chemistry optimization effort leading to the identification of a novel series of phenoxymethyl-dihydrothiazolopyridone derivatives as selective positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) receptor. These dihydrothiazolopyridones potentiate receptor responses in recombinant systems. In vitro and in vivo drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic (DMPK) evaluation allowed us to select compound 16a for its assessment in a preclinical animal screen of possible antipsychotic activity. 16a was able to reverse amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion in rats in a dose-dependent manner without showing any significant motor impairment or overt neurological side effects at comparable doses. Evolution of our medicinal chemistry program, structure activity, and properties relationships (SAR and SPR) analysis as well as a detailed profile for optimized mGlu5 receptor PAM 16a are described.
doi:10.1021/jm400650w
PMCID: PMC3924858  PMID: 23947773
5.  ML297 (VU0456810), the First Potent and Selective Activator of the GIRK Potassium Channel, Displays Antiepileptic Properties in Mice 
ACS Chemical Neuroscience  2013;4(9):1278-1286.
The G-protein activated, inward-rectifying potassium (K+) channels, “GIRKs”, are a family of ion channels (Kir3.1-Kir3.4) that has been the focus of intense research interest for nearly two decades. GIRKs are comprised of various homo- and heterotetrameric combinations of four different subunits. These subunits are expressed in different combinations in a variety of regions throughout the central nervous system and in the periphery. The body of GIRK research implicates GIRK in processes as diverse as controlling heart rhythm, to effects on reward/addiction, to modulation of response to analgesics. Despite years of GIRK research, very few tools exist to selectively modulate GIRK channels’ activity and until now no tools existed that potently and selectively activated GIRKs. Here we report the development and characterization of the first truly potent, effective, and selective GIRK activator, ML297 (VU0456810). We further demonstrate that ML297 is active in two in vivo models of epilepsy, a disease where up to 40% of patients remain with symptoms refractory to present treatments. The development of ML297 represents a truly significant advancement in our ability to selectively probe GIRK’s role in physiology as well as providing the first tool for beginning to understand GIRK’s potential as a target for a diversity of therapeutic indications.
doi:10.1021/cn400062a
PMCID: PMC3778424  PMID: 23730969
GIRK; G-protein; inward rectifier; potassium channel; epilepsy; activator
6.  Discovery of ‘molecular switches’ within a GIRK activator scaffold that afford selective GIRK inhibitors 
Bioorganic & medicinal chemistry letters  2013;23(16):10.1016/j.bmcl.2013.06.023.
This letter describes a multi-dimensional SAR campaign based on a potent, efficacious and selective GIRK1/2 activator (~10-fold versus GIRK1/4 and inactive on nonGIRK 1-containing GIRKs, GIRK 2 or GIRK2/3). Further chemical optimization through an iterative parallel synthesis effort identified multiple ‘molecular switches’ that modulated the mode of pharmacology from activator to inhibitor, as well as engendering varying selectivity profiles for GIRK1/2 and GIRK1/4. Importantly, these compounds were all inactive on nonGIRK1 containing GIRK channels. However, SAR was challenging as subtle structural modifications had large effects on both mode of pharmacology and GIRK1/2 and GIRK1/4 channel selectivity.
doi:10.1016/j.bmcl.2013.06.023
PMCID: PMC3816575  PMID: 23838260
GIRK; Kir3.x; Activators; Inhibitors; Thallium flux
7.  Discovery and SAR of a novel series of GIRK1/2 and GIRK1/4 activators 
This Letter describes a novel series of GIRK activators identified through an HTS campaign. The HTS lead was a potent and efficacious dual GIRK1/2 and GIRK1/4 activator. Further chemical optimization through both iterative parallel synthesis and fragment library efforts identified dual GIRK1/2 and GIRK1/4 activators as well as the first examples of selective GIRK1/4 activators. Importantly, these compounds were inactive on GIRK2 and other non-GIRK1 containing GIRK channels, and SAR proved shallow.
doi:10.1016/j.bmcl.2013.07.002
PMCID: PMC4066871  PMID: 23916258
GIRK; Kir3.x; Activators; Thallium flux
8.  High-throughput Screening for Small-molecule Modulators of Inward Rectifier Potassium Channels 
Specific members of the inward rectifier potassium (Kir) channel family are postulated drug targets for a variety of disorders, including hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and pain1,2. For the most part, however, progress toward understanding their therapeutic potential or even basic physiological functions has been slowed by the lack of good pharmacological tools. Indeed, the molecular pharmacology of the inward rectifier family has lagged far behind that of the S4 superfamily of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, for which a number of nanomolar-affinity and highly selective peptide toxin modulators have been discovered3. The bee venom toxin tertiapin and its derivatives are potent inhibitors of Kir1.1 and Kir3 channels4,5, but peptides are of limited use therapeutically as well as experimentally due to their antigenic properties and poor bioavailability, metabolic stability and tissue penetrance. The development of potent and selective small-molecule probes with improved pharmacological properties will be a key to fully understanding the physiology and therapeutic potential of Kir channels.
The Molecular Libraries Probes Production Center Network (MLPCN) supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Common Fund has created opportunities for academic scientists to initiate probe discovery campaigns for molecular targets and signaling pathways in need of better pharmacology6. The MLPCN provides researchers access to industry-scale screening centers and medicinal chemistry and informatics support to develop small-molecule probes to elucidate the function of genes and gene networks. The critical step in gaining entry to the MLPCN is the development of a robust target- or pathway-specific assay that is amenable for high-throughput screening (HTS).
Here, we describe how to develop a fluorescence-based thallium (Tl+) flux assay of Kir channel function for high-throughput compound screening7,8,9,10.The assay is based on the permeability of the K+ channel pore to the K+ congener Tl+. A commercially available fluorescent Tl+ reporter dye is used to detect transmembrane flux of Tl+ through the pore. There are at least three commercially available dyes that are suitable for Tl+ flux assays: BTC, FluoZin-2, and FluxOR7,8. This protocol describes assay development using FluoZin-2. Although originally developed and marketed as a zinc indicator, FluoZin-2 exhibits a robust and dose-dependent increase in fluorescence emission upon Tl+ binding. We began working with FluoZin-2 before FluxOR was available7,8 and have continued to do so9,10. However, the steps in assay development are essentially identical for all three dyes, and users should determine which dye is most appropriate for their specific needs. We also discuss the assay's performance benchmarks that must be reached to be considered for entry to the MLPCN. Since Tl+ readily permeates most K+ channels, the assay should be adaptable to most K+ channel targets.
doi:10.3791/4209
PMCID: PMC3582647  PMID: 23381507
Biochemistry; Issue 71; Molecular Biology; Chemistry; Cellular Biology; Chemical Biology; Pharmacology; Molecular Pharmacology; Potassium channels; drug discovery; drug screening; high throughput; small molecules; fluorescence; thallium flux; checkerboard analysis; DMSO; cell lines; screen; assay; assay development
9.  Discovery of the First Highly M5-Preferring Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Ligand, an M5 Positive Allosteric Modulator Derived from a Series of 5-Trifluoromethoxy N-Benzyl Isatins 
Journal of medicinal chemistry  2009;52(11):10.1021/jm900286j.
This report describes the discovery and initial characterization of the first positive allosteric modulator of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype 5 (mAChR5 or M5). Functional HTS, identified VU0119498, which displayed micromolar potencies for potentiation of acetylcholine at M1, M3, and M5 receptors in cell-based Ca2+ mobilization assays. Subsequent optimization led to the discovery of VU0238429, which possessed an EC50 of approximately 1.16 µM at M5 with >30-fold selectivity versus M1 and M3, with no M2 or M4 potentiator activity.
doi:10.1021/jm900286j
PMCID: PMC3875304  PMID: 19438238
10.  Discovery and SAR of a novel series of non-MPEP site mGlu5 PAMs based on an aryl glycine sulfonamide scaffold 
Herein we report the discovery and SAR of a novel series of non-MPEP site metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) based on an aryl glycine sulfonamide scaffold. This series represents a rare non-MPEP site mGlu5 PAM chemotype.
doi:10.1016/j.bmcl.2012.10.068
PMCID: PMC3539767  PMID: 23142615
metabotropic glutamate receptor 5; mGlu5; positive allosteric modulator (PAM); non-MPEP
11.  Nonoisotopic Assay for the Presynaptic Choline Transporter Reveals Capacity for Allosteric Modulation of Choline Uptake 
ACS Chemical Neuroscience  2012;3(10):767-781.
Current therapies to enhance CNS cholinergic function rely primarily on extracellular acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, a pharmacotherapeutic strategy that produces dose-limiting side effects. The Na+-dependent, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) is an unexplored target for cholinergic medication development. Although functional at the plasma membrane, CHT at steady-state is localized to synaptic vesicles such that vesicular fusion can support a biosynthetic response to neuronal excitation. To identify allosteric potentiators of CHT activity, we mapped endocytic sequences in the C-terminus of human CHT, identifying transporter mutants that exhibit significantly increased transport function. A stable HEK-293 cell line was generated from one of these mutants (CHT LV-AA) and used to establish a high-throughput screen (HTS) compatible assay based on the electrogenic nature of the transporter. We established that the addition of choline to these cells, at concentrations appropriate for high-affinity choline transport at presynaptic terminals, generates a hemicholinium-3 (HC-3)-sensitive, membrane depolarization that can be used for the screening of CHT inhibitors and activators. Using this assay, we discovered that staurosporine increased CHT LV-AA choline uptake activity, an effect mediated by a decrease in choline KM with no change in Vmax. As staurosporine did not change surface levels of CHT, nor inhibit HC-3 binding, we propose that its action is directly or indirectly allosteric in nature. Surprisingly, staurosporine reduced choline-induced membrane depolarization, suggesting that increased substrate coupling to ion gradients, arising at the expense of nonstoichiometric ion flow, accompanies a shift of CHT to a higher-affinity state. Our findings provide a new approach for the identification of CHT modulators that is compatible with high-throughput screening approaches and presents a novel model by which small molecules can enhance substrate flux through enhanced gradient coupling.
doi:10.1021/cn3000718
PMCID: PMC3474274  PMID: 23077721
Choline; transporter; hemicholinium-3; uptake; allosterism; assay; electrogenic
12.  Optimization of an ether series of mGlu5 positive allosteric modulators: Molecular determinants of MPEP-site interaction crossover 
We report the optimization of a series of non-MPEP site metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) based on a simple acyclic ether series. Modifications led to a gain of MPEP site interaction through incorporation of a chiral amide in conjunction with a nicotinamide core. A highly potent PAM, 8v (VU0404251), was shown to be efficacious in a rodent model of psychosis. These studies suggest that potent PAMs within topologically similar chemotypes can be developed to preferentially interact or not interact with the MPEP allosteric binding site.
doi:10.1016/j.bmcl.2012.08.043
PMCID: PMC3755010  PMID: 22981332
Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5; mGlu5; Positive allosteric modulator (PAM); Non-MPEP
13.  Iterative experimental and virtual high-throughput screening identifies metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4 positive allosteric modulators 
Journal of molecular modeling  2012;18(9):4437-4446.
Activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4 has been shown to be efficacious in rodent models of Parkinson’s disease. Artificial neural networks were trained based on a recently reported high throughput screen which identified 434 positive allosteric modulators of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4 out of a set of approximately 155,000 compounds. A jury system containing three artificial neural networks achieved a theoretical enrichment of 15.4 when selecting the top 2% compounds of an independent test dataset. The model was used to screen an external commercial database of approximately 450,000 drug-like compounds. 1,100 predicted active small molecules were tested experimentally using two distinct assays of mGlu4 activity. This experiment yielded 67 positive allosteric modulators of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4 that confirmed in both experimental systems. Compared to the 0.3% active compounds in the primary screen, this constituted an enrichment of 22 fold.
doi:10.1007/s00894-012-1441-0
PMCID: PMC3766737  PMID: 22592386
Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4; Virtual high-throughput screening; Machine learning; Quantitative structure-activity relationship; Enrichment
14.  Benchmarking Ligand-Based Virtual High-Throughput Screening with the PubChem Database 
Molecules (Basel, Switzerland)  2013;18(1):735-756.
With the rapidly increasing availability of High-Throughput Screening (HTS) data in the public domain, such as the PubChem database, methods for ligand-based computer-aided drug discovery (LB-CADD) have the potential to accelerate and reduce the cost of probe development and drug discovery efforts in academia. We assemble nine data sets from realistic HTS campaigns representing major families of drug target proteins for benchmarking LB-CADD methods. Each data set is public domain through PubChem and carefully collated through confirmation screens validating active compounds. These data sets provide the foundation for benchmarking a new cheminformatics framework BCL::ChemInfo, which is freely available for non-commercial use. Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models are built using Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), Support Vector Machines (SVMs), Decision Trees (DTs), and Kohonen networks (KNs). Problem-specific descriptor optimization protocols are assessed including Sequential Feature Forward Selection (SFFS) and various information content measures. Measures of predictive power and confidence are evaluated through cross-validation, and a consensus prediction scheme is tested that combines orthogonal machine learning algorithms into a single predictor. Enrichments ranging from 15 to 101 for a TPR cutoff of 25% are observed.
doi:10.3390/molecules18010735
PMCID: PMC3759399  PMID: 23299552
virtual screening; machine learning; quantitative structure-activity relations (QSAR); high-throughput screening (HTS); cheminformatics; PubChem; BCL
15.  Further optimization of the K-Cl cotransporter KCC2 antagonist ML077: Development of a highly selective and more potent in vitro probe 
Further chemical optimization of the MLSCN/MLPCN probe ML077 (KCC2 IC50 = 537 nM) proved to be challenging as the effort was characterized by steep SAR. However, a multidimensional iterative parallel synthesis approach proved productive. Herein we report the discovery and SAR of an improved novel antagonist (VU0463271) of the neuronal-specific potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 (KCC2), with an IC50 of 61 nM and >100-fold selectivity versus the closely related Na-K-2Cl cotransporter 1 (NKCC1) and no activity in a larger panel of GPCRs, ion channels and transporters.
doi:10.1016/j.bmcl.2012.05.126
PMCID: PMC3389279  PMID: 22727639
Potassium-chloride co-transporter 2; KCC2; NKCC1; antagonist
16.  Discovery of N-Aryl Piperazines as Selective mGlu5 Potentiators with Efficacy in a Rodent Model Predictive of Anti-Psychotic Activity 
ACS medicinal chemistry letters  2010;1(8):433-438.
This Letter describes the discovery, SAR and in vitro and in vivo pharmacological profile of a novel non-MPEP derived mGlu5 positive allosteric modulator (PAM) based upon an N-aryl piperazine chemotype. This mGlu5 chemotype exhibits the ability to act as either a non-competitive antagonist/negative allosteric modulator (NAM) or potentiator of the glutamate response depending on the identity of the amide substituent, i.e., a ‘molecular switch’. A rapidly optimized PAM, 10e (VU0364289), was shown to be potent and specific for the rat mGlu5 receptor and subsequently demonstrated to be efficacious in a clinically relevant rodent model predictive of anti-psychotic activity, thus providing the first example of a centrally active mGluR5 PAM optimized from an HTS-derived mGluR5 competitive antagonist.
doi:10.1021/ml100181a
PMCID: PMC3539763  PMID: 23308336
mGluR; potentiator; positive allosteric modulator; schizophrenia; hyperlocomotion
17.  The Discovery and Characterization of ML218: A Novel, Centrally Active T-Type Calcium Channel Inhibitor with Robust Effects in STN Neurons and in a Rodent Model of Parkinson’s Disease 
ACS chemical neuroscience  2011;2(12):730-742.
T-type Ca2+ channel inhibitors hold tremendous therapeutic potential for the treatment of pain, epilepsy, sleep disorders, essential tremor and other neurological disorders; however, a lack of truly selective tools has hindered basic research, and selective tools from the pharmaceutical industry are potentially burdened with intellectual property (IP) constraints. Thus, an MLPCN high-throughput screen (HTS) was conducted to identify novel T-type Ca2+ channel inhibitors free from IP constraints, and freely available through the MLPCN, for use by the biomedical community to study T-type Ca2+ channels. While the HTS provided numerous hits, these compounds could not be optimized to the required level of potency to be appropriate tool compounds. Therefore, a scaffold hopping approach, guided by SurflexSim, ultimately afforded ML218 (CID 45115620) a selective T-Type Ca2+ (Cav3.1, Cav3.2, Cav3.3) inhibitor (Cav3.2, IC50 = 150 nM in Ca2+ flux; Cav3.2 IC50 = 310 nM and Cav3.3 IC50 = 270 nM, respectively in patch clamp electrophysiology) with good DMPK properties, acceptable in vivo rat PK and excellent brain levels. Electrophysiology studies in subthalamic nucleus (STN) neurons demonstrated robust effects of ML218 on the inhibition of T-Type calcium current, inhibition of low threshold spike and rebound burst activity. Based on the basal ganglia circuitry in Parkinson’s disease (PD), the effects of ML218 in STN neurons suggest a therapeutic role for T-type Ca2+ channel inhibitors, and ML218 was found to be orally efficacious in haloperidol-induced catalepsy, a preclinical PD model, with comparable efficacy to an A2A antagonist, a clinically validated PD target. ML218 proves to be a powerful new probe to study T-Type Ca2+ function in vitro and in vivo, and freely available.
doi:10.1021/cn200090z
PMCID: PMC3285241  PMID: 22368764
T-Type calcium channel; inhibitor; electrophysiology; Parkinson’s disease
18.  The Discovery and Characterization of ML218: A Novel, Centrally Active T-Type Calcium Channel Inhibitor with Robust Effects in STN Neurons and in a Rodent Model of Parkinson’s Disease 
ACS Chemical Neuroscience  2011;2(12):730-742.
T-Type Ca2+ channel inhibitors hold tremendous therapeutic potential for the treatment of pain, epilepsy, sleep disorders, essential tremor, and other neurological disorders; however, a lack of truly selective tools has hindered basic research, and selective tools from the pharmaceutical industry are potentially burdened with intellectual property (IP) constraints. Thus, an MLPCN high-throughput screen (HTS) was conducted to identify novel T-type Ca2+ channel inhibitors free from IP constraints, and freely available through the MLPCN, for use by the biomedical community to study T-type Ca2+ channels. While the HTS provided numerous hits, these compounds could not be optimized to the required level of potency to be appropriate tool compounds. Therefore, a scaffold hopping approach, guided by SurflexSim, ultimately afforded ML218 (CID 45115620), a selective T-type Ca2+ (Cav3.1, Cav3.2, Cav3.3) inhibitor (Cav3.2, IC50 = 150 nM in Ca2+ flux; Cav3.2 IC50 = 310 nM; and Cav3.3 IC50 = 270 nM, respectively in patch clamp electrophysiology) with good DMPK properties, acceptable in vivo rat PK, and excellent brain levels. Electrophysiology studies in subthalamic nucleus (STN) neurons demonstrated robust effects of ML218 on the inhibition of T-type calcium current, inhibition of low threshold spike, and rebound burst activity. Based on the basal ganglia circuitry in Parkinson’s disease (PD), the effects of ML218 in STN neurons suggest a therapeutic role for T-type Ca2+ channel inhibitors, and ML218 was found to be orally efficacious in haloperidol-induced catalepsy, a preclinical PD model, with comparable efficacy to an A2A antagonist, a clinically validated PD target. ML218 proves to be a powerful new probe to study T-type Ca2+ function in vitro and in vivo, and freely available.
doi:10.1021/cn200090z
PMCID: PMC3285241  PMID: 22368764
T-Type calcium channel; inhibitor; electrophysiology; Parkinson’s disease
19.  Synthesis and SAR of centrally active mGlu5 positive allosteric modulators based on an aryl acetylenic bicyclic lactam scaffold 
This Letter describes the hit-to-lead progression and SAR of a series of biphenyl acetylene compounds derived from an HTS screening campaign targeting the mGlu5 receptor. ‘Molecular switches’ were identified that modulated modes of pharmacology, and several compounds within this series were shown to be efficacious in reversal of amphetamine induced hyperlocomotion in rats after i.p. dosing, a preclinical model that shows similar positive effects with known antipsychotic agents.
doi:10.1016/j.bmcl.2011.01.044
PMCID: PMC3498823  PMID: 21315585
20.  Discovery, Synthesis, SAR Development of a Series of N-4-(2,5-dioxopyrrolidin-1-yl)-phenylpicolinamides (VU0400195, ML182): Characterization of a Novel Positive Allosteric Modulator of the Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 4 (mGlu4) with Oral Efficacy in an anti-Parkinsonian Animal Model 
Journal of medicinal chemistry  2011;54(21):7639-7647.
There is an increasing amount of literature data showing the positive effects on preclinical anti-Parkinsonian rodent models with selective positive allosteric modulators of metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (mGlu4).1 However, most of the data generated utilize compounds that have not been optimized for drug-like properties and, as a consequence, they exhibit poor pharmacokinetic properties and thus do not cross the blood-brain barrier. Herein, we report on a series of N-4-(2,5-dioxopyrrolidin-1-yl)-phenylpicolinamides with improved PK properties with excellent potency and selectivity as well as improved brain exposure in rodents. Finally, ML182 was shown to be orally active in the haloperidol induced catalepsy model, a well-established anti-Parkinsonian model.
doi:10.1021/jm200956q
PMCID: PMC3226828  PMID: 21966889
metabotropic glutamate receptors; mGlu4; positive allosteric modulators; Parkinson’s disease; haloperidol-induced catalepsy; structure-activity relationship (SAR); oral efficacy; brain penetration
21.  High-Throughput Quantification of Bioactive Lipids by MALDI Mass Spectrometry: Application to Prostaglandins 
Analytical chemistry  2011;83(17):6683-6688.
Analysis and quantification of analytes in biological systems is a critical component of metabolomic investigations of cell function. The most widely used methods employ chromatographic separation followed by mass spectrometric analysis, which requires significant time for sample preparation and sequential chromatography. We introduce a novel high-throughput, separation-free methodology based on MALDI mass spectrometry that allows for the parallel analysis of targeted metabolomes. Proof-of-concept is demonstrated by analysis of prostaglandins and glyceryl prostaglandins. Derivatization to incorporate a charged moiety into ketone-containing prostaglandins dramatically increases the signal-to-noise ratio relative to underivatized samples. This resulted in an increased dynamic range (15 fmol – 2000 fmol on plate) and improved linearity (r2= 0.99). The method was adapted for high-throughput screening methods for enzymology and drug discovery. Application to cellular metabolomics was also demonstrated.
doi:10.1021/ac201224n
PMCID: PMC3165080  PMID: 21770391
22.  Identification and Optimization of Small Molecules That Restore E-Cadherin Expression and Reduce Invasion in Colorectal Carcinoma Cells 
ACS Chemical Biology  2011;6(5):452-465.
E-cadherin is a transmembrane protein that maintains intercellular contacts and cell polarity in epithelial tissue. The down-regulation of E-cadherin contributes to the induction of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), resulting in an increased potential for cellular invasion of surrounding tissues and entry into the bloodstream. Loss of E-cadherin has been observed in a variety of human tumors as a result of somatic mutations, chromosomal deletions, silencing of the CDH1 gene promoter, and proteolytic cleavage. To date, no compounds directly targeting E-cadherin restoration have been developed. Here, we report the development and use of a novel high-throughput immunofluorescent screen to discover lead compounds that restore E-cadherin expression in the SW620 colon adenocarcinoma cell line. We confirmed restoration of E-cadherin using immunofluorescent microscopy and were able to determine the EC50 for selected compounds using an optimized In-Cell Western assay. The profiled compounds were also shown to have a minimal effect on cell proliferation but did decrease cellular invasion. We have also conducted preliminary investigations to elucidate a discrete molecular target to account for the phenotypic behavior of these small molecules and have noted a modest increase in E-cadherin mRNA transcripts, and RNA-Seq analysis demonstrated that potent analogues elicited a 10-fold increase in CDH1 (E-cadherin) gene expression.
doi:10.1021/cb100305h
PMCID: PMC3401128  PMID: 21241068
23.  Development of a high throughput screen for allosteric modulators of melanocortin-4 receptor signaling using a real time cAMP assay 
European journal of pharmacology  2011;660(1):139-147.
The melanocortin MC4 receptor is a potential target for the development of drugs for both obesity and cachexia. Melanocortin MC4 receptor ligands known thus far are orthosteric agonists or antagonists, however the agonists, in particular, have generally exhibited unwanted side effects. For some receptors, allosteric modulators are expected to reduce side-effect profiles. To identify allosteric modulators of the melanocortin MC4 receptor, we created HEK293 cell lines coexpressing the human melanocortin MC4 receptor and a modified luciferase-based cAMP sensor. Monitoring luminescence as a readout of real-time intracellular cAMP concentration, we demonstrate this cell line is able to report melanocortin agonist responses, as well as inverse agonist response to the physiological AgRP peptide. Based on the MC4R-GLO cell line, we developed an assay that was shown to meet HTS standards (Z’=0.50). A pilot screen run on the Microsource Spectrum compound library (n= 2,000) successfully identified 62 positive modulators. This screen identified predicted families of compounds: β2AR agonists –the β2AR being endogenously expressed in HEK293 cells-, an adenylyl cyclase activator and finally a distribution of phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors well characterized or recently identified. In this last category, we identified a structural family of coumarin-derived compounds (imperatorin, osthol and prenyletin), along with deracoxib, a drug in veterinary use for its COX2 inhibitory properties. This latter finding unveiled a new off-target mechanism of action for deracoxib as a PDE inhibitor. Overall, these data are the first report of an HTS for allosteric modulators for a Gs protein coupled receptor.
doi:10.1016/j.ejphar.2011.01.031
PMCID: PMC3175485  PMID: 21296065
24.  Discovery and optimization of a novel, selective and brain penetrant M1 positive allosteric modulator (PAM): the development of ML169, an MLPCN Probe 
This Letter describes a chemical lead optimization campaign directed at VU0108370, a weak M1 PAM hit with a novel chemical scaffold from a functional HTS screen within the MLPCN. An iterative parallel synthesis approach rapidly established SAR for this series and afforded VU0405652 (ML169), a potent, selective and brain penetrant M1 PAM with an in vitro profile comparable to the prototypical M1 PAM, BQCA, but with an improved brain to plasma ratio.
doi:10.1016/j.bmcl.2010.12.015
PMCID: PMC3082000  PMID: 21194936
25.  Solution-Phase Parallel Synthesis and SAR of Homopiperazinyl Analogs as Positive Allosteric Modulators of mGlu4 
ACS combinatorial science  2011;13(2):159-165.
Using a functional high-throughput screening (HTS) and subsequent solution-phase parallel synthesis approach, we have discovered a novel series of positive allosteric modulators for mGlu4, a G-protein coupled receptor. This series is comprised of a homopiperazine central core. The solution-phase parallel synthesis and SAR of analogs derived from this series will be presented. This series of positive allosteric modulators of mGlu4 provide critical research tools to further probe the mGlu4-mediated effects in Parkinson’s disease.
doi:10.1021/co1000508
PMCID: PMC3057427  PMID: 21338051

Results 1-25 (37)