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1.  Spinal cord tract diffusion tensor imaging reveals disability substrate in demyelinating disease 
Neurology  2013;80(24):2201-2209.
This study assessed the tissue integrity of major cervical cord tracts by using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to determine the relationship with specific clinical functions carried by those tracts.
This was a cross-sectional study of 37 patients with multiple sclerosis or neuromyelitis optica with remote cervical cord disease. Finger vibratory thresholds, 25-foot timed walk (25FTW), 9-hole peg test (9HPT), and Expanded Disability Status Scale were determined. DTI covered cervical regions C1 through C6 with 17 5-mm slices (0.9 × 0.9 mm in-plane resolution). Regions of interest included posterior columns (PCs) and lateral corticospinal tracts (CSTs). Hierarchical linear mixed-effect modeling included covariates of disease subtype (multiple sclerosis vs neuromyelitis optica), disease duration, and sex.
Vibration thresholds were associated with radial diffusivity (RD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) in the PCs (both p < 0.01), but not CSTs (RD, p = 0.29; FA, p = 0.14). RD and FA in PCs, and RD in CSTs were related to 9HPT (each p < 0.0001). 25FTW was associated with RD and FA in PCs (p < 0.0001) and RD in CSTs (p = 0.008). Expanded Disability Status Scale was related to RD and FA in PCs and CSTs (p < 0.0001). Moderate/severe impairments in 9HPT (p = 0.006) and 25FTW (p = 0.017) were more likely to show combined moderate/severe tissue injury within both PCs and CSTs by DTI.
DTI can serve as an imaging biomarker of spinal cord tissue injury at the tract level. RD and FA demonstrate strong and consistent relationships with clinical outcomes, specific to the clinical modality.
PMCID: PMC3721096  PMID: 23667060
2.  Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Acute Optic Neuropathies 
Archives of neurology  2011;69(1):65-71.
To evaluate directional diffusivities within the optic nerve in a first event of acute optic neuritis to determine whether decreased axial diffusivity (AD) would predict 6-month visual outcome and optic nerve integrity measures.
Cohort study.
Academic multiple sclerosis center.
Referred sample of 25 individuals who presented within 31 days after acute visual symptoms consistent with optic neuritis. Visits were scheduled at baseline, 2 weeks, and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months.
Main Outcome Measures
Visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, visual evoked potentials (VEPs), and thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL).
An incomplete 6-month visual recovery was associated with a lower baseline AD (1.50 μm2/ms [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.36–1.64 μm2/ms for incomplete recovery vs 1.75 μm2/ms [95% CI, 1.67–1.83 μm2/ms] for complete recovery). Odds of complete recovery decreased by 53% (95% CI, 27%–70%) for every 0.1-unit decrease in baseline AD. A lower baseline AD correlated with worse 6-month visual outcomes in visual acuity (r=0.40, P=.03), contrast sensitivity (r=0.41, P=.02), VEP amplitude (r=0.55, P<.01), VEP latency (r=−0.38, P=.04), and RNFL thickness (r=0.53, P=.02). Radial diffusivity increased between months 1 and 3 to become higher in those with incomplete recovery at 12 months than in those with complete recovery (1.45 μm2/ms [95% CI, 1.31–1.59 μm2/ms] vs 1.19 μm2/ms [95% CI, 1.10–1.28 μm2/ms]).
Decreased AD in acute optic neuritis was associated with a worse 6-month visual outcome and correlated with VEP and RNFL measures of axon and myelin injury. Axial diffusivity may serve as a marker of axon injury in acute white matter injury.
PMCID: PMC3489058  PMID: 21911658
3.  Acute and Bilateral Blindness Due to Optic Neuropathy Associated With Copper Deficiency 
Archives of neurology  2009;66(8):1025-1027.
Acquired copper deficiency in adults is associated with a subacute to chronic progressive myeloneuropathy and optic neuropathy.
To describe an individual after gastric bypass surgery who developed a chronic progressive myeloneuropathy, an acute optic neuropathy, along with anemia and leukopenia.
Case report.
Academic center.
A 55-year-old woman, following gastric bypass surgery 22 years earlier, developed progressive numbness, weakness, and sphincter disturbance over 6 years. She awoke one morning with bilateral blindness. Examination findings showed evidence of severe myelopathy and peripheral neuropathy.
Main Outcome Measures
Magnetic resonance imaging, optical coherence tomography, electrophysiologic studies, nerve and muscle biopsy specimens, and vision testing.
Over 1 year of follow-up, copper infusion therapy seemed to stabilize the progressive myeloneuropathy and improved leukopenia and anemia. It had no effect on the optic neuropathy. Optic nerve tissue injury was observed on magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging and on optical coherence tomography.
Copper deficiency should be considered in cases of atypical optic neuropathy. Serum copper levels should be monitored in patients with a compatible neurologic syndrome who have undergone gastric bypass surgery. Although visual acuity did not improve after copper infusion in our patient, prompt recognition of copper deficiency may prevent further deterioration.
PMCID: PMC2893403  PMID: 19667226

Results 1-3 (3)