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1.  In vivo characterization of the early states of the amyloid-beta network 
Brain  2013;136(7):2239-2252.
Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease that is associated with the abnormal accumulation of amyloid-β. Much is known about regional brain atrophy in Alzheimer’s disease, yet our knowledge about the network nature of Alzheimer’s disease-associated amyloid-β accumulation is limited. We use stepwise connectivity analysis of Pittsburgh Compound B positron emission tomography images to reveal the network properties of amyloid-β deposits in normal elderly subjects and clinical patients with Alzheimer’s disease. We found that amyloid-β accumulation in the medial temporal lobe is associated with accumulation in cortical regions such as orbitofrontal, lateral temporal and precuneus/posterior cingulate cortices in Alzheimer’s disease. In normal subjects, there was a predominant association between amyloid-β deposits in the hippocampus and the midline prefrontal/orbitofrontal regions, even in those with very low amyloid-β burden. Moreover, the orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala nucleus and hippocampus exhibit hub properties in the amyloid-β network that may be critical to understanding the putative spreading mechanisms of Alzheimer’s disease pathology in early stages.
doi:10.1093/brain/awt146
PMCID: PMC3692037  PMID: 23801740
Alzheimer’s disease; network; amyloid; graph theory; early stages
2.  Age and APOE genotype influence rate of cognitive decline in non-demented elderly 
Neuropsychology  2013;27(4):10.1037/a0032707.
Objective
This study examined the impact of age and apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype on the rate of cognitive decline in non-demented elderly participants in a simulated Alzheimer’s disease (AD) primary prevention treatment trial carried out by the Alzheimer’s Disease Cooperative Study.
Method
Cognitive tests were administered at baseline and at four subsequent annual evaluations to 417 non-demented participants (172 men, 245 women) between the ages of 74 and 93 (mean=79.13 ± 3.34). APOE genotyping was available for 286 of the participants.
Results
Four-year decline was evident on measures of orientation, memory, executive function and language. Faster decline was evident in APOE ε4+ (a genetic risk factor for AD; n=73) than ε4− participants (n=213), even after controlling for education, gender, ethnicity, and baseline functional and cognitive abilities. This discrepancy increased with increasing age indicating an age X genotype interaction.
Conclusions
These results are consistent with population-based studies, and extend the findings to a carefully-screened sample that meets inclusion and exclusion criteria for an AD primary prevention trial. The interaction between age and APOE genotype on rate of decline suggests that preclinical disease may be over represented in olderε4+ individuals. Thus, APOE genotype and age should be considered in the design of AD primary prevention treatment trials.
doi:10.1037/a0032707
PMCID: PMC3831285  PMID: 23876113
Cognitive decline; Apolipoprotein E; Aging
3.  Amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIA) in Alzheimer’s disease patients treated with bapineuzumab: A retrospective analysis 
Lancet neurology  2012;11(3):241-249.
Background
Amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIA) have been reported in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients treated with bapineuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody to amyloid-β. ARIA includes MRI signal abnormalities suggestive of vasogenic edema and sulcal effusions (ARIA-E) and hemosiderin deposits (ARIA-H). A better understanding of the incidence and risk factors for ARIA may further the development of amyloid-modifying treatments for AD.
Methods
Two neuroradiologists independently reviewed (kappa=0.76) and then reached consensus reads on over 2500 FLAIR-MRIs from 262 participants in three phase 2 studies of bapineuzumab. Subjects (n=210) were included in risk analyses if they had no evidence of ARIA-E on pre-treatment MRI, received bapineuzumab, and had at least one post-treatment MRI.
Findings
36/210 (17%) subjects developed ARIA-E during treatment; 28 of these 36 (78%) did not report associated symptoms. Adverse events reported in 8 symptomatic patients included headache, confusion, neuropsychiatric and gastrointestinal symptoms. 15/36 of the ARIA-E cases (42%) were detected only on central review. 13/15 received additional infusions while ARIA-E was present, without any associated symptoms reported. ARIA-E incidence increased with bapineuzumab dose (Hazard Ratio [HR] 2.24 per mg/kg increase in dose; p<0·001) and with APOE ε4 allele number (HR 2.55 per allele; p<0·001).
Interpretation
ARIA appears to represent a spectrum of imaging findings with variable clinical correlates, with some cases remaining asymptomatic even when treated through ARIA-E. The increased risk of ARIA with APOE ε4 and bapineuzumab dose, and the time course in relation to dosing, is consistent with alterations in vascular amyloid burden.
doi:10.1016/S1474-4422(12)70015-7
PMCID: PMC4063417  PMID: 22305802
4.  The A4 Study: Stopping AD before Symptoms Begin? 
Science translational medicine  2014;6(228):228fs13.
A secondary prevention trial in older people with amyloid accumulation at high risk for Alzheimer’s disease dementia should provide insights into whether anti-amyloid therapy can delay cognitive decline.
doi:10.1126/scitranslmed.3007941
PMCID: PMC4049292  PMID: 24648338
5.  APOE ε4 does not modulate amyloid-β associated neurodegeneration in preclinical Alzheimer’s disease 
Background and Purpose
Among cognitively normal older individuals, the relationship between the two hallmark proteins of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau, the ε4 allele of apolipoprotein E (APOE ε4), and neurodegeneration is not well understood.
Materials and Methods
We examined 107 cognitively healthy older adults who underwent longitudinal MR imaging and baseline lumbar puncture. Within the same linear mixed effects model, we concurrently investigated main and interactive effects between APOE ε4 genotype and CSF Aβ1-42, CSF phospo-tau (p-tau181p) and CSF Aβ1-42, and APOE ε4 genotype and CSF p-tau181p on entorhinal cortex atrophy rate. We also examined the relationship between APOE ε4, CSF p-tau181p, and CSF Aβ1-42 on atrophy rate of other AD-vulnerable neuroanatomic regions.
Results
The full model with main and interactive effects demonstrated a significant interaction only between CSF p-tau181p and CSF Aβ1-42 on entorhinal cortex atrophy rate indicating elevated atrophy over time in individuals with increased CSF p-tau181p and decreased CSF Aβ1-42. APOE ε4 genotype was significantly and specifically associated with CSF Aβ1-42. However, the interaction between APOE ε4 genotype and either CSF Aβ1-42 or CSF p-tau181p on entorhinal cortex atrophy rate was not significant. We found similar results in other AD-vulnerable regions.
Conclusions
Based upon our findings and building upon prior experimental evidence, we propose a model of the pathogenic cascade underlying preclinical AD where APOE ε4 primarily influences Alzheimer’s pathology via Aβ-related mechanisms and in turn, Aβ-associated neurodegeneration occurs only in the presence of phospho-tau.
doi:10.3174/ajnr.A3267
PMCID: PMC4041629  PMID: 22976236
preclinical AD; neurodegeneration; p-tau; amyloid-β; APOE
6.  The Ups and Downs of the Posteromedial Cortex: Age- and Amyloid-Related Functional Alterations of the Encoding/Retrieval Flip in Cognitively Normal Older Adults 
Cerebral Cortex (New York, NY)  2012;23(6):1317-1328.
Neural networks supporting memory function decline with increasing age. Accumulation of amyloid-β, a histopathological finding in Alzheimer's disease, is a likely contributor. Posteromedial cortices (PMCs) are particularly vulnerable to early amyloid pathology and play a role in both encoding and retrieval processes. The extent to which aging and amyloid influence the ability to modulate activity between these processes within the PMC was investigated by combining positron emission tomography-amyloid imaging with functional magnetic resonance imaging in cognitively normal older and young adults. Young subjects exhibited a marked decrease in activity during encoding and an increase during retrieval (also known as encoding/retrieval “flip”). Impaired ability to modulate activity was associated with increasing age, greater amyloid burden, and worse memory performance. In contrast, the hippocampus showed increased activity during both encoding and retrieval, which was not related to these variables. These findings support a specific link between amyloid pathology and neural dysfunction in PMC and elucidate the underpinnings of age-related memory dysfunction.
doi:10.1093/cercor/bhs108
PMCID: PMC3643714  PMID: 22586140
aging; amyloid; encoding; functional MRI; retrieval
8.  Mild to Moderate Alzheimer Dementia with Insufficient Neuropathological Changes 
Annals of neurology  2014;75(4):597-601.
Recently, ∼16% of participants in an anti-Aβ passive immunotherapy trial for mild-to-moderate Alzheimer disease (AD) had a negative baseline amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) scan. Whether they have AD or are AD clinical phenocopies remains unknown. We examined the 2005-2013 National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center autopsy database and found that ∼14% of autopsied subjects clinically diagnosed with mild-to-moderate probable AD have no or sparse neuritic plaques, which would expectedly yield a negative amyloid PET scan. More than half of these “Aβ-negative” subjects have low neurofibrillary tangle Braak stages. These findings support the implementation of a positive amyloid biomarker as an inclusion criterion in future anti-Aβ drug trials.
doi:10.1002/ana.24125
PMCID: PMC4016558  PMID: 24585367
9.  Cortical atrophy in presymptomatic Alzheimer’s disease presenilin 1 mutation carriers 
Background
Sporadic late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia has been associated with a ‘signature’ of cortical atrophy in paralimbic and heteromodal association regions measured with MRI.
Objective
To investigate whether a similar pattern of cortical atrophy is present in presymptomatic presenilin 1 E280A mutation carriers an average of 6 years before clinical symptom onset.
Methods
40 cognitively normal volunteers from a Colombian population with familial AD were included; 18 were positive for the AD-associated presenilin 1 mutation (carriers, mean age=38) whereas 22 were non-carriers. T1-weighted volumetric MRI images were acquired and cortical thickness was measured. A priori regions of interest from our previous work were used to obtain thickness from AD-signature regions.
Results
Compared to non-carriers, presymptomatic presenilin 1 mutation carriers exhibited thinner cortex within the AD-signature summary measure (p<0.008). Analyses of individual regions demonstrated thinner angular gyrus, precuneus and superior parietal lobule in carriers compared to non-carriers, with trend-level effects in the medial temporal lobe.
Conclusion
Results demonstrate that cognitively normal individuals genetically determined to develop AD have a thinner cerebral cortex than non-carriers in regions known to be affected by typical late-onset sporadic AD. These findings provide further support for the hypothesis that cortical atrophy is present in preclinical AD more than 5 years prior to symptom onset. Further research is needed to determine whether this method could be used to characterise the age-dependent trajectory of cortical atrophy in presymptomatic stages of AD.
doi:10.1136/jnnp-2012-303299
PMCID: PMC3632663  PMID: 23134660
10.  Apathy is associated with increased amyloid burden in mild cognitive impairment 
Apathy is the most common neuropsychiatric symptom in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia. We sought to determine whether apathy is associated with cortical amyloid burden measured by Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) positron emission tomography (PET) and regional hypometabolism measured by 18F-fluorodeoxyglocuse (FDG) PET in MCI. We found a significant association between increased apathy (lower Apathy Evaluation Scale score) and greater cortical PiB retention independent of age (prs=−0.46, p=0.03), but no significant association between apathy and regional FDG metabolism. These results suggest that increased apathy is associated with greater amyloid burden but not regional hypometabolism in MCI.
doi:10.1176/appi.neuropsych.12060156
PMCID: PMC3957217  PMID: 24247857
Alzheimer’s disease; amyloid; apathy; 18F-flourodeoxyglucose; mild cognitive impairment; Pittsburgh Compound B; positron emission tomography
11.  Amyloid deposition detected with florbetapir F 18 (18F-AV-45) is related to lower episodic memory performance in clinically normal older individuals 
Neurobiology of aging  2012;34(3):822-831.
The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship of amyloid burden, as assessed by florbetapir F 18 (18F-AV-45) amyloid PET, and cognition in healthy older control subjects (HC). Seventy-eight HC subjects were assessed with a brief cognitive test battery and PET imaging with florbetapir F 18. A standard uptake value ratio (SUVr) was computed for mean data from six cortical regions using a whole cerebellum reference region. Scans were also visually rated as amyloid positive (Aβ+) or amyloid negative (Aβ−) by three readers. Higher SUVr correlated with lower immediate memory (r=−0.33; p=0.003) and delayed recall scores (r=−0.25; p=0.027). Performance on immediate recall was also lower in the visually rated Aβ+ compared to Aβ− HC (p=0.04), with a similar trend observed in delayed recall (p=0.06). These findings support the hypothesis that higher amyloid burden is associated with lower memory performance among clinically normal older subjects. Longitudinal follow-up is ongoing to determine whether florbetapir F 18 may also predict subsequent cognitive decline.
doi:10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2012.06.014
PMCID: PMC3518678  PMID: 22878163
12.  New ELISAs with high specificity for soluble oligomers of amyloid β-protein detect natural Aβ oligomers in human brain but not CSF 
Background
Soluble oligomers of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) have been increasingly linked to synaptic dysfunction, tau alteration and neuritic dystrophy in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and mouse models. There is a great need for assays that quantify Aβ oligomers with high specificity and sensitivity.
Methods
We designed and validated two oligomer-specific (o-) ELISAs using either an Aβ aggregate-selective monoclonal for capture and a monoclonal to the free N-terminus for detection or the latter antibody for both capture and detection.
Results
The o-ELISAs specifically quantified pure oligomers of synthetic Aβ with sizes from dimers up to much larger assemblies and over a wide dynamic range of concentrations, whereas Aβ monomers were undetectable. Natural Aβ oligomers of similarly wide size and concentration ranges were measured in extracts of AD and control brains, revealing >1,000-fold higher concentrations of Aβ oligomers than monomers in the soluble fraction of AD cortex. The assays quantified the age-related rise in oligomers in hAPP transgenic mice. Unexpectedly, none of 90 human CSF samples gave a specific signal in either o-ELISA.
Conclusions
These new o-ELISAs with rigorously confirmed specificity can quantify oligomer burden in human and mouse brains for diagnostic and mechanistic studies and for AD biomarker development. However, our data raise the likelihood that the hydrophobicity of Aβ oligomers makes them very low or absent in aqueous CSF.
doi:10.1016/j.jalz.2012.11.005
PMCID: PMC3604133  PMID: 23375565
Alzheimer’s disease; amyloid β-peptide; oligomers; cerebrospinal fluid; brain extracts; ELISAs
13.  The parahippocampal gyrus links the default-mode cortical network with the medial temporal lobe memory system 
Human brain mapping  2013;35(3):1061-1073.
The default-mode network (DMN) is a distributed functional-anatomic network implicated in supporting memory. Current resting-state functional connectivity studies in humans remain divided on the exact involvement of medial temporal lobe (MTL) in this network at rest. Notably, it is unclear to what extent the MTL regions involved in successful memory encoding are connected to the cortical nodes of the DMN during resting-state. Our findings using functional connectivity MRI analyses of resting-state data indicate that the parahippocampal gyrus (PHG) is the primary hub of the DMN in the MTL during resting-state. Also, connectivity of the PHG is distinct from connectivity of hippocampal regions identified by an associative memory encoding task. We confirmed that several hippocampal encoding regions lack significant functional connectivity with cortical DMN nodes during resting-state. Additionally, a mediation analysis showed that resting-state connectivity between the hippocampus and posterior cingulate cortex — a major hub of the DMN — is indirect and mediated by the PHG. Our findings support the hypothesis that the MTL memory system represents a functional sub-network that relates to the cortical nodes of the DMN through parahippocampal functional connections.
doi:10.1002/hbm.22234
PMCID: PMC3773261  PMID: 23404748
Brain mapping; physiology; human; resting state; functional connectivity; brain networks; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; MTL; mediation; young adult
14.  Impaired default network functional connectivity in autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease 
Neurology  2013;81(8):736-744.
Objective:
To investigate default mode network (DMN) functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) in a large cross-sectional cohort of subjects from families harboring pathogenic presenilin-1 (PSEN1), presenilin-2 (PSEN2), and amyloid precursor protein (APP) mutations participating in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network.
Methods:
Eighty-three mutation carriers and 37 asymptomatic noncarriers from the same families underwent fMRI during resting state at 8 centers in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. Using group-independent component analysis, fcMRI was compared using mutation status and Clinical Dementia Rating to stratify groups, and related to each participant's estimated years from expected symptom onset (eYO).
Results:
We observed significantly decreased DMN fcMRI in mutation carriers with increasing Clinical Dementia Rating, most evident in the precuneus/posterior cingulate and parietal cortices (p < 0.001). Comparison of asymptomatic mutation carriers with noncarriers demonstrated decreased fcMRI in the precuneus/posterior cingulate (p = 0.014) and right parietal cortex (p = 0.0016). We observed a significant interaction between mutation carrier status and eYO, with decreases in DMN fcMRI observed as mutation carriers approached and surpassed their eYO.
Conclusion:
Functional disruption of the DMN occurs early in the course of autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease, beginning before clinically evident symptoms, and worsening with increased impairment. These findings suggest that DMN fcMRI may prove useful as a biomarker across a wide spectrum of disease, and support the feasibility of DMN fcMRI as a secondary endpoint in upcoming multicenter clinical trials in Alzheimer disease.
doi:10.1212/WNL.0b013e3182a1aafe
PMCID: PMC3776464  PMID: 23884042
15.  Imaging markers for Alzheimer disease 
Neurology  2013;81(5):487-500.
Revised diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer disease (AD) acknowledge a key role of imaging biomarkers for early diagnosis. Diagnostic accuracy depends on which marker (i.e., amyloid imaging, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose [FDG]-PET, SPECT, MRI) as well as how it is measured (“metric”: visual, manual, semiautomated, or automated segmentation/computation). We evaluated diagnostic accuracy of marker vs metric in separating AD from healthy and prognostic accuracy to predict progression in mild cognitive impairment. The outcome measure was positive (negative) likelihood ratio, LR+ (LR−), defined as the ratio between the probability of positive (negative) test outcome in patients and the probability of positive (negative) test outcome in healthy controls. Diagnostic LR+ of markers was between 4.4 and 9.4 and LR− between 0.25 and 0.08, whereas prognostic LR+ and LR− were between 1.7 and 7.5, and 0.50 and 0.11, respectively. Within metrics, LRs varied up to 100-fold: LR+ from approximately 1 to 100; LR− from approximately 1.00 to 0.01. Markers accounted for 11% and 18% of diagnostic and prognostic variance of LR+ and 16% and 24% of LR−. Across all markers, metrics accounted for an equal or larger amount of variance than markers: 13% and 62% of diagnostic and prognostic variance of LR+, and 29% and 18% of LR−. Within markers, the largest proportion of diagnostic LR+ and LR− variability was within 18F-FDG-PET and MRI metrics, respectively. Diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of imaging AD biomarkers is at least as dependent on how the biomarker is measured as on the biomarker itself. Standard operating procedures are key to biomarker use in the clinical routine and drug trials.
doi:10.1212/WNL.0b013e31829d86e8
PMCID: PMC3776529  PMID: 23897875
16.  CD33 Alzheimer’s disease locus: Altered monocyte function and amyloid biology 
Nature neuroscience  2013;16(7):10.1038/nn.3435.
In our functional dissection of the CD33 Alzheimer’s disease susceptibility locus, we find that the rs3865444C risk allele is associated with greater cell surface expression of CD33 in monocytes (t50 = 10.06, pjoint=1.3×10–13) of young and older individuals. It is also associated with (1) diminished internalization of Aβ42) (2) accumulation of neuritic amyloid pathology and fibrillar amyloid on in vivo imaging and (3), increased numbers of activated human microglia.
doi:10.1038/nn.3435
PMCID: PMC3703870  PMID: 23708142
17.  The Association between a Polygenic Alzheimer Score and Cortical Thickness in Clinically Normal Subjects 
Cerebral Cortex (New York, NY)  2011;22(11):2653-2661.
Late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) is 50–70% heritable with complex genetic underpinnings. In addition to Apoliprotein E (APOE) ε4, the major genetic risk factor, recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a growing list of sequence variations associated with the disease. Building on a prior large-scale AD GWAS, we used a recently developed analytic method to compute a polygenic score that involves up to 26 independent common sequence variants and is associated with AD dementia, above and beyond APOE. We then examined the associations between the polygenic score and the magnetic resonance imaging–derived thickness measurements across AD-vulnerable cortex in clinically normal (CN) human subjects (N = 104). AD-specific cortical thickness was correlated with the polygenic risk score, even after controlling for APOE genotype and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of β-amyloid (Aβ1–42). Furthermore, the association remained significant in CN subjects with levels of CSF Aβ1–42 in the normal range and in APOE ε3 homozygotes. The observation that genetic risk variants are associated with thickness across AD-vulnerable regions of interest in CN older individuals, suggests that the combination of polygenic risk profile, neuroimaging, and CSF biomarkers may hold synergistic potential to aid in the prediction of future cognitive decline.
doi:10.1093/cercor/bhr348
PMCID: PMC3464416  PMID: 22169231
Alzheimer's disease; imaging genetics; polygenic score
18.  Amyloid-β assessed by florbetapir F 18 PET and 18-month cognitive decline 
Neurology  2012;79(16):1636-1644.
Objectives:
Florbetapir F 18 PET can image amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregates in the brains of living subjects. We prospectively evaluated the prognostic utility of detecting Aβ pathology using florbetapir PET in subjects at risk for progressive cognitive decline.
Methods:
A total of 151 subjects who previously participated in a multicenter florbetapir PET imaging study were recruited for longitudinal assessment. Subjects included 51 with recently diagnosed mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 69 cognitively normal controls (CN), and 31 with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer disease dementia (AD). PET images were visually scored as positive (Aβ+) or negative (Aβ−) for pathologic levels of β-amyloid aggregation, blind to diagnostic classification. Cerebral to cerebellar standardized uptake value ratios (SUVr) were determined from the baseline PET images. Subjects were followed for 18 months to evaluate changes in cognition and diagnostic status. Analysis of covariance and correlation analyses were conducted to evaluate the association between baseline PET amyloid status and subsequent cognitive decline.
Results:
In both MCI and CN, baseline Aβ+ scans were associated with greater clinical worsening on the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale–Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog (p < 0.01) and Clinical Dementia Rating–sum of boxes (CDR-SB) (p < 0.02). In MCI Aβ+ scans were also associated with greater decline in memory, Digit Symbol Substitution (DSS), and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) (p < 0.05). In MCI, higher baseline SUVr similarly correlated with greater subsequent decline on the ADAS-Cog (p < 0.01), CDR-SB (p < 0.03), a memory measure, DSS, and MMSE (p < 0.05). Aβ+ MCI tended to convert to AD dementia at a higher rate than Aβ− subjects (p < 0.10).
Conclusions:
Florbetapir PET may help identify individuals at increased risk for progressive cognitive decline.
doi:10.1212/WNL.0b013e3182661f74
PMCID: PMC3468774  PMID: 22786606
19.  The pattern of atrophy in familial Alzheimer disease 
Neurology  2013;81(16):1425-1433.
Objective:
To assess regional patterns of gray and white matter atrophy in familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) mutation carriers.
Methods:
A total of 192 participants with volumetric T1-weighted MRI, genotyping, and clinical diagnosis were available from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network. Of these, 69 were presymptomatic mutation carriers, 50 were symptomatic carriers (31 with Clinical Dementia Rating [CDR] = 0.5, 19 with CDR > 0.5), and 73 were noncarriers from the same families. Voxel-based morphometry was used to identify cross-sectional group differences in gray matter and white matter volume.
Results:
Significant differences in gray matter (p < 0.05, family-wise error–corrected) were observed between noncarriers and mildly symptomatic (CDR = 0.5) carriers in the thalamus and putamen, as well as in the temporal lobe, precuneus, and cingulate gyrus; the same pattern, but with more extensive changes, was seen in those with CDR > 0.5. Significant white matter differences between noncarriers and symptomatic carriers were observed in the cingulum and fornix; these form input and output connections to the medial temporal lobe, cingulate, and precuneus. No differences between noncarriers and presymptomatic carriers survived correction for multiple comparisons, but there was a trend for decreased gray matter in the thalamus for carriers closer to their estimated age at onset. There were no significant increases of gray or white matter in asymptomatic or symptomatic carriers compared to noncarriers.
Conclusions:
Atrophy in FAD is observed early, both in areas commonly associated with sporadic Alzheimer disease and also in the putamen and thalamus, 2 regions associated with early amyloid deposition in FAD mutation carriers.
doi:10.1212/WNL.0b013e3182a841c6
PMCID: PMC3806583  PMID: 24049139
20.  Developing an international network for Alzheimer research: The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network 
Clinical investigation  2012;2(10):975-984.
The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) is a collaborative effort of international Alzheimer disease (AD) centers that are conducting a multifaceted prospective biomarker study in individuals at-risk for autosomal dominant AD (ADAD). DIAN collects comprehensive information and tissue in accordance with standard protocols from asymptomatic and symptomatic ADAD mutation carriers and their non-carrier family members to determine the pathochronology of clinical, cognitive, neuroimaging, and fluid biomarkers of AD. This article describes the structure, implementation, and underlying principles of DIAN, as well as the demographic features of the initial DIAN cohort.
doi:10.4155/cli.12.93
PMCID: PMC3489185  PMID: 23139856
Alzheimer disease; autosomal dominant; biomarkers of Alzheimer disease; PSEN1; PSEN2; APP; amyloid-beta; preclinical Alzheimer disease
21.  The encoding/retrieval flip: Interactions between memory performance and memory stage and relationship to intrinsic cortical networks 
Journal of cognitive neuroscience  2013;25(7):1163-1179.
Functional MRI (fMRI) studies have linked the posteromedial cortex to episodic learning (encoding) and remembering (retrieval) processes. The posteromedial cortex is considered part of the default network and tends to deactivate during encoding, but activate during retrieval, a pattern known as the encoding/retrieval flip. Yet, the exact relationship between the neural correlates of memory performance (hit/miss) and memory stage (encoding/retrieval) and the extent of overlap with intrinsic cortical networks remains to be elucidated. Using task-based fMRI, we isolated the pattern of activity associated with memory performance, memory stage and the interaction between both. Using resting-state fMRI, we identified which intrinsic large-scale functional networks overlapped with regions showing task-induced effects. Our results demonstrated an effect of successful memory performance in regions associated with the control network and an effect of unsuccessful memory performance in the ventral attention network. We found an effect of memory retrieval in brain regions that span the default and control networks. Finally, we found an interaction between memory performance and memory stage in brain regions associated with the default network, including the posteromedial cortex, posterior parietal cortex and parahippocampal cortex. We discuss these findings in relation to the encoding/retrieval flip. In general, the findings demonstrate that task-induced effects cut across intrinsic cortical networks. Furthermore, regions within the default network display functional dissociations and this may have implications for the neural underpinnings of age-related memory disorders.
doi:10.1162/jocn_a_00366
PMCID: PMC3730829  PMID: 23384193
23.  Neuropsychiatric symptoms and global functional impairment along the Alzheimer’s continuum 
Background/Aims
Neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are highly prevalent. We sought to determine whether neuropsychiatric symptoms were related to global functional impairment at baseline and over a 3 year period in normal older control (NC), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and mild AD dementia subjects.
Methods
Eight hundred and twelve subjects (229 NC, 395 MCI, 188 AD) from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study underwent 3 years of cognitive and behavioral assessments.
Results
Greater hallucinations, anxiety, and apathy were associated with greater global functional impairment at baseline, while baseline hallucinations and apathy were associated with greater global functional impairment over time across all subjects. The following neuropsychiatric symptoms were not significantly associated with global functioning: delusions, agitation, depression, euphoria, disinhibition, irritability, aberrant motor behaviors, sleep, and appetite.
Conclusions
These results suggest that increased baseline hallucinations and apathy are associated with current and future disease progression in AD.
doi:10.1159/000342119
PMCID: PMC3549662  PMID: 22922821
Alzheimer’s disease; anxiety; apathy; disease progression; hallucinations; MCI; Neuropsychiatric Symptoms
24.  Testing the Right Target and the Right Drug at the Right Stage 
Science translational medicine  2011;3(111):111cm33.
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the only leading cause of death for which no disease-modifying therapy is currently available. Recent disappointing trial results at the dementia stage of AD have raised multiple questions about our current approaches to the development of disease-modifying agents. Converging evidence suggests that the pathophysiological process of AD begins many years before the onset of dementia. So why do we keep testing drugs aimed at the initial stages of the disease process in patients at the end-stage of the illness?
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) remains one of the most feared consequences of aging, affecting more than one out of every ten individuals over the age of 65. With more than 10,000 baby boomers turning 65 every day in the United States alone, we are truly facing an AD epidemic. Over the past decade, a string of disappointing clinical trial results have raised concerns about our current strategy for development of AD-modifying therapies. Three hypotheses can explain these recent AD trial failures: (i) We are targeting the wrong pathophysiological mechanisms; (ii) The drugs do not engage the intended targets in patients; and (iii) The drugs are hitting the right targets, but are doing so at the wrong stage of the disease. Here, we address the third supposition and suggest that specific amyloid-based therapies be directed at much earlier stages of ADperhaps even prior to the emergence of clinical symptoms. Furthermore, we argue that the field has sufficient tools to begin “secondary prevention” trials in asymptomatic individuals whoare at high risk for progression to cognitive impairment and AD dementia.
doi:10.1126/scitranslmed.3002609
PMCID: PMC3752906  PMID: 22133718
25.  Activities of daily living: where do they fit in the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease? 
Impairment in activities of daily living (ADL) accompanies cognitive and behavioral symptoms in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Conventionally, ADL impairment has been relegated to the stage of dementia, but instrumental ADL impairment has been shown to occur earlier at the stage of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). There are many subjective and performance-based instrumental ADL scales, some of which are useful in distinguishing between MCI and AD dementia, and even between MCI and clinically normal elderly individuals. These scales have been associated with amyloid and neurodegeneration biomarkers of AD. Clinically normal elderly individuals who have a positive AD biomarker are thought to be at the preclinical stage of AD. Scales of more complex ADL are needed to better capture individuals with preclinical AD before they start to progress to MCI.
doi:10.2217/nmt.12.55
PMCID: PMC3622716  PMID: 23585777

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