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1.  CETP polymorphisms associate with brain structure, atrophy rate, and Alzheimer’s disease risk in an APOE-dependent manner 
Brain imaging and behavior  2012;6(1):16-26.
Two alleles in cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) gene polymorphisms have been disputably linked to enhanced cognition and decreased risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD): the V and A alleles of I405V and C-629A. This study investigates whether these polymorphisms affect brain structure in 188 elderly controls and 318 AD or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative cohort. Nominally signficant associations were dependent on APOE ε4 carrier status. In APOE ε4 carriers, the V and A alleles, both of which decrease CETP and increase HDL, associated with greater baseline cortical thickness and less 12-month atrophy in the medial temporal lobe. Conversely, in APOE ε4 non-carriers, the I allele, which increases CETP and decreases HDL, associated with greater baseline thickness, less atrophy and lower risk of dementia. These results suggest CETP may contribute to the genetic variability of brain structure and dementia susceptibility in an APOE-dependent manner.
doi:10.1007/s11682-011-9137-0
PMCID: PMC4305449  PMID: 21892657
Imaging genetics; Quantitative neuroimaging; CETP; Alzheimer’s disease; Dementia; APOE
2.  Critical ages in the life-course of the adult brain: nonlinear subcortical aging 
Neurobiology of aging  2013;34(10):2239-2247.
Age-related changes in brain structure result from a complex interplay between various neurobiological processes, which may contribute to more complex trajectories than can be described by simple linear or quadratic models. We used a non-parametric smoothing spline approach to delineate cross-sectionally estimated age-trajectories of the volume of 17 neuroanatomical structures in 1100 healthy adults (18–94 years). Accelerated estimated decline in advanced age characterized some structures, e.g. hippocampus, but was not the norm. For most areas, one or two critical ages were identified, characterized by changes in the estimated rate of change. One year follow up data from 142 healthy older adults (60–91 years) confirmed the existence of estimated change from the cross-sectional analyses for all areas except one (caudate). The cross-sectional and the longitudinal analyses agreed well on the rank order of age effects on specific brain structures (Spearman’s ρ = .91). The main conclusions are that most brain structures do not follow a simple path throughout adult life, and that accelerated decline in high age is not the norm of healthy brain aging.
doi:10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2013.04.006
PMCID: PMC3706494  PMID: 23643484
aging; magnetic resonance imaging; longitudinal; trajectory; atrophy; amygdala; cerebral cortex; hippocampus; thalamus; white matter
3.  The role of clusterin in amyloid-β associated neurodegeneration 
JAMA neurology  2014;71(2):180-187.
Importance
Converging evidence indicates that clusterin, a chaperone glycoprotein, influences Alzheimer's disease (AD) neurodegeneration. However, the precise role of clusterin in AD pathogenesis is still not well understood.
Objective
To elucidate the relationship between clusterin, amyloid-β (Aβ), p-tau, and rate of brain atrophy over time among non-demented older individuals.
Design
A longitudinal cohort of cognitively normal older participants (HC) and individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) assessed with baseline lumbar puncture and longitudinal structural MRI.
Setting
Research centers across the United States and Canada.
Participants
We examined 241 non-demented older individuals (91 participants with a Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) of 0 and 150 individuals with a CDR of 0.5).
Main Outcome Measures
Using linear mixed effects models, we investigated interactions between CSF clusterin, CSF Aβ1-42 and CSF p-tau181p on atrophy rate of the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus.
Results
Across all participants, we found a significant interaction between CSF clusterin and CSF Aβ1-42 on entorhinal cortex atrophy rate, but not on hippocampal atrophy rate. CSF clusterin was associated with entorhinal cortex atrophy rate among CSF Aβ1-42 positive individuals, but not among CSF Aβ1-42 negative individuals. In secondary analyses, we found significant interactions between CSF Aβ1-42 and CSF clusterin and CSF Aβ1-42 and CSF p-tau181p on entorhinal cortex atrophy rate. We found similar results in subgroup analyses within the MCI and HC cohorts.
Conclusions and Relevance
In non-demented older individuals, Aβ-associated volume loss occurs in the presence of elevated clusterin. The effect of clusterin on Aβ-associated brain atrophy is not confounded or explained by p-tau. These findings implicate a potentially important role for clusterin in the earliest stages of the AD neurodegenerative process and suggest independent effects of clusterin and p-tau on Aβ-associated volume loss.
doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.4560
PMCID: PMC4118752  PMID: 24378367
4.  APOE ε4 does not modulate amyloid-β associated neurodegeneration in preclinical Alzheimer’s disease 
Background and Purpose
Among cognitively normal older individuals, the relationship between the two hallmark proteins of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau, the ε4 allele of apolipoprotein E (APOE ε4), and neurodegeneration is not well understood.
Materials and Methods
We examined 107 cognitively healthy older adults who underwent longitudinal MR imaging and baseline lumbar puncture. Within the same linear mixed effects model, we concurrently investigated main and interactive effects between APOE ε4 genotype and CSF Aβ1-42, CSF phospo-tau (p-tau181p) and CSF Aβ1-42, and APOE ε4 genotype and CSF p-tau181p on entorhinal cortex atrophy rate. We also examined the relationship between APOE ε4, CSF p-tau181p, and CSF Aβ1-42 on atrophy rate of other AD-vulnerable neuroanatomic regions.
Results
The full model with main and interactive effects demonstrated a significant interaction only between CSF p-tau181p and CSF Aβ1-42 on entorhinal cortex atrophy rate indicating elevated atrophy over time in individuals with increased CSF p-tau181p and decreased CSF Aβ1-42. APOE ε4 genotype was significantly and specifically associated with CSF Aβ1-42. However, the interaction between APOE ε4 genotype and either CSF Aβ1-42 or CSF p-tau181p on entorhinal cortex atrophy rate was not significant. We found similar results in other AD-vulnerable regions.
Conclusions
Based upon our findings and building upon prior experimental evidence, we propose a model of the pathogenic cascade underlying preclinical AD where APOE ε4 primarily influences Alzheimer’s pathology via Aβ-related mechanisms and in turn, Aβ-associated neurodegeneration occurs only in the presence of phospho-tau.
doi:10.3174/ajnr.A3267
PMCID: PMC4041629  PMID: 22976236
preclinical AD; neurodegeneration; p-tau; amyloid-β; APOE
5.  Higher Rates of Decline for Women and APOE ε4 Carriers 
Background and Purpose
Age and the ε4 allele of apolipoprotein E (APOE ε4) are well-known risk factors for Alzheimer disease (AD), but whether female sex is also a risk factor remains controversial. It is also unclear how these risk factors affect rates of structural brain and clinical decline across the spectrum of preclinical to clinical AD. Our objective is to estimate the effects of APOE ε4 and sex on age-specific rates of morphometric and clinical decline in late onset sporadic AD.
Materials and Methods
Using linear mixed effects models, we examined the effect of age, APOE ε4, and sex on longitudinal brain atrophy and clinical decline among cognitively normal older individuals, and individuals with mild cognitive impairment and AD (total = 688). We also evaluated the relationship between these effects and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of AD pathology.
Results
APOE ε4 significantly accelerated rates of decline, and women in all cohorts experienced higher rates of decline than men. The magnitude of the sex effect on rates of decline were as large as those of ε4, yet their relationship to measures of CSF biomarkers were weaker.
Conclusion
These results indicate that in addition to APOE ε4 status, diagnostic and therapeutic strategies should take into account the effect of female sex on the Alzheimer disease process.
doi:10.3174/ajnr.A3601
PMCID: PMC3894062  PMID: 23828104
6.  Brain Changes in Older Adults at Very Low Risk for Alzheimer's Disease 
The Journal of Neuroscience  2013;33(19):8237-8242.
Alzheimer's disease (AD) has a slow onset, so it is challenging to distinguish brain changes in healthy elderly persons from incipient AD. One-year brain changes with a distinct frontotemporal pattern have been shown in older adults. However, it is not clear to what extent these changes may have been affected by undetected, early AD. To address this, we estimated 1-year atrophy by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 132 healthy elderly persons who had remained free of diagnosed mild cognitive impairment or AD for at least 3 years. We found significant volumetric reductions throughout the brain. The sample was further divided into low-risk groups based on clinical, biomarker, genetic, or cognitive criteria. Although sample sizes varied, significant reductions were observed in all groups, with rates and topographical distribution of atrophy comparable to that of the full sample. Volume reductions were especially pronounced in the default mode network, closely matching the previously described frontotemporal pattern of changes in healthy aging. Atrophy in the hippocampus predicted change in memory, with no additional default mode network contributions. In conclusion, reductions in regional brain volumes can be detected over the course of 1 year even in older adults who are unlikely to be in a presymptomatic stage of AD.
doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.5506-12.2013
PMCID: PMC4050197  PMID: 23658162
7.  Higher Education is Not Associated with Greater Cortical Thickness in Brain Areas Related to Literacy or Intelligence in Normal Aging or Mild Cognitive Impairment 
Education may reduce risk of dementia through passive reserve, by increasing neural substrate. We tested the hypotheses that education is associated with thicker cortex and reduced rates of atrophy in brain regions related to literacy and intellectual ability. Healthy older adults and those with mild cognitive impairment were categorized into High (≥18 yrs) and Low (≤13 yrs) education groups. Higher education was associated with thinner cortices in several areas, but one-year atrophy rates in these areas did not differ by education group. These results do not support a passive reserve model in which early life education protects against dementia by increasing cortical thickness. Connectivity and synaptic efficiency, or other lifestyle factors may more directly reflect cognitive reserve.
doi:10.1080/13803395.2012.702733
PMCID: PMC3488147  PMID: 22905705
Brain reserve; cortical thickness; education; hippocampal volume; literacy; Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI); aging
8.  Heart fatty acid binding protein and Aβ-associated Alzheimer’s neurodegeneration 
Background
Epidemiological and molecular findings suggest a relationship between Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and dyslipidemia, although the nature of this association is not well understood.
Results
Using linear mixed effects models, we investigated the relationship between CSF levels of heart fatty acid binding protein (HFABP), a lipid binding protein involved with fatty acid metabolism and lipid transport, amyloid-β (Aβ), phospho-tau, and longitudinal MRI-based measures of brain atrophy among 295 non-demented and demented older individuals. Across all participants, we found a significant association of CSF HFABP with longitudinal atrophy of the entorhinal cortex and other AD-vulnerable neuroanatomic regions. However, we found that the relationship between CSF HABP and brain atrophy was significant only among those with low CSF Aβ1–42 and occurred irrespective of phospho-tau181p status.
Conclusions
Our findings indicate that Aβ-associated volume loss occurs in the presence of elevated HFABP irrespective of phospho-tau. This implicates a potentially important role for fatty acid binding proteins in Alzheimer’s disease neurodegeneration.
doi:10.1186/1750-1326-8-39
PMCID: PMC3850652  PMID: 24088526
Alzheimer’s disease; Fatty acids; Lipids; Amyloid; Tau; Brain atrophy
9.  Unbiased Comparison of Sample Size Estimates From Longitudinal Structural Measures in ADNI 
Human brain mapping  2011;33(11):2586-2602.
Structural changes in neuroanatomical subregions can be measured using serial magnetic resonance imaging scans, and provide powerful biomarkers for detecting and monitoring Alzheimer's disease. The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has made a large database of longitudinal scans available, with one of its primary goals being to explore the utility of structural change measures for assessing treatment effects in clinical trials of putative disease-modifying therapies. Several ADNI-funded research laboratories have calculated such measures from the ADNI database and made their results publicly available. Here, using sample size estimates, we present a comparative analysis of the overall results that come from the application of each laboratory's extensive processing stream to the ADNI database. Obtaining accurate measures of change requires correcting for potential bias due to the measurement methods themselves; and obtaining realistic sample size estimates for treatment response, based on longitudinal imaging measures from natural history studies such as ADNI, requires calibrating measured change in patient cohorts with respect to longitudinal anatomical changes inherent to normal aging. We present results showing that significant longitudinal change is present in healthy control subjects who test negative for amyloid-β pathology. Therefore, sample size estimates as commonly reported from power calculations based on total structural change in patients, rather than change in patients relative to change in healthy controls, are likely to be unrealistically low for treatments targeting amyloid-related pathology. Of all the measures publicly available in ADNI, thinning of the entorhinal cortex quantified with the Quarc methodology provides the most powerful change biomarker.
doi:10.1002/hbm.21386
PMCID: PMC3782292  PMID: 21830259
MCI; bias; biomarker; clinical trial; disease-specific effect; amyloid; aging; Alzheimer's disease; entorhinal cortex; hippocampus
10.  Relationship between regional atrophy rates and cognitive decline in mild cognitive impairment 
Neurobiology of aging  2010;33(2):242-253.
We investigated the relationship between regional atrophy rates and 2-year cognitive decline in a large cohort of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI; N=103) and healthy controls (N=90). Longitudinal MRIs were analyzed using high-throughput image analysis procedures. Atrophy rates were derived by calculating percent cortical volume loss between baseline and 24-month scans. Step-wise regressions were performed to investigate the contribution of atrophy rates to language, memory, and executive functioning decline, controlling for age, gender, baseline performances, and disease progression. In MCI, left temporal lobe atrophy rates were associated with naming decline, whereas bilateral temporal, left frontal, and left anterior cingulate atrophy rates were associated with semantic fluency decline. Left entorhinal atrophy rate was associated with memory decline and bilateral frontal atrophy rates were associated with executive function decline. These data provide evidence that regional atrophy rates in MCI contribute to domain-specific cognitive decline, which appears to be partially independent of disease progression. MRI measures of regional atrophy can provide valuable information for understanding the neural basis of cognitive impairment in MCI.
doi:10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2010.03.015
PMCID: PMC2923665  PMID: 20471718
cortical thinning; cognitive deficits; naming; semantic fluency; verbal memory; executive dysfunction
11.  Enrichment and Stratification for Predementia Alzheimer Disease Clinical Trials 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(10):e47739.
The tau and amyloid pathobiological processes underlying Alzheimer disease (AD) progresses slowly over periods of decades before clinical manifestation as mild cognitive impairment (MCI), then more rapidly to dementia, and eventually to end-stage organ failure. The failure of clinical trials of candidate disease modifying therapies to slow disease progression in patients already diagnosed with early AD has led to increased interest in exploring the possibility of early intervention and prevention trials, targeting MCI and cognitively healthy (HC) populations. Here, we stratify MCI individuals based on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers and structural atrophy risk factors for the disease. We also stratify HC individuals into risk groups on the basis of CSF biomarkers for the two hallmark AD pathologies. Results show that the broad category of MCI can be decomposed into subsets of individuals with significantly different average regional atrophy rates. By thus selectively identifying individuals, combinations of these biomarkers and risk factors could enable significant reductions in sample size requirements for clinical trials of investigational AD-modifying therapies, and provide stratification mechanisms to more finely assess response to therapy. Power is sufficiently high that detecting efficacy in MCI cohorts should not be a limiting factor in AD therapeutics research. In contrast, we show that sample size estimates for clinical trials aimed at the preclinical stage of the disorder (HCs with evidence of AD pathology) are prohibitively large. Longer natural history studies are needed to inform design of trials aimed at the presymptomatic stage.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0047739
PMCID: PMC3474753  PMID: 23082203
12.  Bias in tensor based morphometry Stat-ROI measures may result in unrealistic power estimates 
NeuroImage  2011;57(1):1-4.
A series of reports have recently appeared using tensor based morphometry statistically-defined regions of interest, Stat-ROIs, to quantify longitudinal atrophy in structural MRIs from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). This commentary focuses on one of these reports, Hua et al. (2010), but the issues raised here are relevant to the others as well. Specifically, we point out a temporal pattern of atrophy in subjects with Alzheimer’s disease and mild cognitive impairment whereby the majority of atrophy in two years occurs within the first 6 months, resulting in overall elevated estimated rates of change. Using publicly-available ADNI data, this temporal pattern is also found in a group of identically-processed healthy controls, strongly suggesting that methodological bias is corrupting the measures. The resulting bias seriously impacts the validity of conclusions reached using these measures; for example, sample size estimates reported by Hua et al. (2010) may be underestimated by a factor of five to sixteen.
doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.11.092
PMCID: PMC3471806  PMID: 21349340
Nonlinear image registration; Regional change quantification; MRI biomarkers; Clinical trials; Bias; Alzheimer’s disease
13.  Amyloid-β associated volume loss occurs only in the presence of phospho-tau 
Annals of Neurology  2011;70(4):657-661.
The relationship between neurodegeneration and the two hallmark proteins of Alzheimer's disease, amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau, is still unclear. Here, we examined 286 non-demented participants (107 cognitively normal older adults and 179 memory impaired individuals) who underwent longitudinal MR imaging and lumbar puncture. Using mixed effects models, we investigated the relationship between longitudinal entorhinal cortex atrophy, CSF p-tau181p and CSF Aβ1-42. We found a significant relationship between elevated entorhinal cortex atrophy and decreased CSF Aβ1-42 only with elevated CSF p-tau181p. Our findings indicate that Aβ-associated volume loss occurs only in the presence of phospho-tauin humans at risk for dementia.
doi:10.1002/ana.22509
PMCID: PMC3368003  PMID: 22002658
14.  Amyloid-β associated clinical decline occurs only in the presence of elevated p-tau 
Archives of neurology  2012;69(6):709-713.
Objective
To elucidate the relationship between the two hallmark proteins of Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau, and clinical decline over time among cognitively normal older individuals.
Design
A longitudinal cohort of clinically and cognitively normal older individuals assessed with baseline lumbar puncture and longitudinal clinical assessments.
Setting
Research centers across the United States and Canada.
Patients
We examined one hundred seven participants with a Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) of 0 at baseline examination.
Main Outcome Measures
Using linear mixed effects models, we investigated the relationship between CSF p-tau181p, CSF Aβ1-42 and clinical decline as assessed using longitudinal change in global CDR, CDR-Sum of Boxes (CDR-SB), and the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog).
Results
We found a significant relationship between decreased CSF Aβ1-42 and longitudinal change in global CDR, CDR-SB, and ADAS-cog in individuals with elevated CSF p-tau181p. In the absence of CSF p-tau181p, the effect of CSF Aβ1-42 on longitudinal clinical decline was not significantly different from zero.
Conclusions
In cognitively normal older individuals, Aβ-associated clinical decline over a mean of three years may occur only in the presence of ongoing, “downstream” neurodegeneration.
doi:10.1001/archneurol.2011.3354
PMCID: PMC3423526  PMID: 22529247
15.  Rates of Decline in Alzheimer Disease Decrease with Age 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(8):e42325.
Age is the strongest risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD), yet the effects of age on rates of clinical decline and brain atrophy in AD have been largely unexplored. Here, we examined longitudinal rates of change as a function of baseline age for measures of clinical decline and structural MRI-based regional brain atrophy, in cohorts of AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and cognitively healthy (HC) individuals aged 65 to 90 years (total n = 723). The effect of age was modeled using mixed effects linear regression. There was pronounced reduction in rates of clinical decline and atrophy with age for AD and MCI individuals, whereas HCs showed increased rates of clinical decline and atrophy with age. This resulted in convergence in rates of change for HCs and patients with advancing age for several measures. Baseline cerebrospinal fluid densities of AD-relevant proteins, Aβ1–42, tau, and phospho-tau181p (ptau), showed a similar pattern of convergence with advanced age across cohorts, particularly for ptau. In contrast, baseline clinical measures did not differ by age, indicating uniformity of clinical severity at baseline. These results imply that the phenotypic expression of AD is relatively mild in individuals older than approximately 85 years, and this may affect the ability to distinguish AD from normal aging in the very old. Our findings show that inclusion of older individuals in clinical trials will substantially reduce the power to detect disease-modifying therapeutic effects, leading to dramatic increases in required clinical trial sample sizes with age of study sample.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0042325
PMCID: PMC3410919  PMID: 22876315
16.  Nonlinear Registration of Longitudinal Images and Measurement of Change in Regions of Interest 
Medical image analysis  2011;15(4):489-497.
We describe here a method, Quarc, for accurately quantifying structural changes in organs, based on serial MRI scans. The procedure can be used to measure deformations globally or in regions of interest (ROIs), including large-scale changes in the whole organ, and subtle changes in small-scale structures. We validate the method with model studies, and provide an illustrative analysis using the brain. We apply the method to the large, publicly available ADNI database of serial brain scans, and calculate Cohen’s d effect sizes for several ROIs. Using publicly available derived-data, we directly compare effect sizes from Quarc with those from four existing methods that quantify cerebral structural change. Quarc produced a slightly improved, though not significantly different, whole brain effect size compared with the standard KN-BSI method, but in all other cases it produced significantly larger effect sizes.
doi:10.1016/j.media.2011.02.005
PMCID: PMC3115407  PMID: 21388857
Nonlinear image registration; Regional change quantification; MRI biomarkers
17.  Brain Atrophy in Healthy Aging Is Related to CSF Levels of Aβ1-42 
Cerebral Cortex (New York, NY)  2010;20(9):2069-2079.
Reduced levels of β-amyloid1-42 (Aβ1-42) and increased levels of tau proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are found in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), likely reflecting Aβ deposition in plaques and neuronal and axonal damage. It is not known whether these biomarkers are associated with brain atrophy also in healthy aging. We tested the relationship between CSF levels of Aβ1-42 and tau (total tau and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181) proteins and 1-year brain atrophy in 71 cognitively normal elderly individuals. Results showed that under a certain threshold value, levels of Aβ1-42 correlated highly with 1-year change in a wide range of brain areas. The strongest relationships were not found in the regions most vulnerable early in AD. Above the threshold level, Aβ1-42 was not related to brain changes, but significant volume reductions as well as ventricular expansion were still seen. It is concluded that Aβ1-42 correlates with brain atrophy and ventricular expansion in a subgroup of cognitively normal elderly individuals but that reductions independent of CSF levels of Aβ1-42 is common. Further research and follow-up examinations over several years are needed to test whether degenerative pathology will eventually develop in the group of cognitively normal elderly individuals with low levels of Aβ1-42.
doi:10.1093/cercor/bhp279
PMCID: PMC3025722  PMID: 20051356
aging; amyloid; cerebral cortex; CSF biomarkers; MRI
18.  Cortical Gray Matter Atrophy in Healthy Aging Cannot Be Explained by Undetected Incipient Cognitive Disorders: A Comment on Burgmans et al. (2009) 
Neuropsychology  2010;24(2):258-266.
Burgmans, van Boxtel, Vuurman, et al. (2009) published an interesting study titled “The Prevalence of Cortical Gray Matter Atrophy May Be Overestimated in the Healthy Aging Brain” on how subclinical cognitive disorders may affect correlations between age and cortical volume. Correlations between cortical gray matter volume and age were found in 30 elderly with cognitive decline after 6 years, but not in 28 elderly without cognitive decline. This study is important, and demonstrates that preclinical cognitive disorders may affect cortical brain volumes before being detectable by neuropsychological tests. However, we are not convinced by the conclusions: “… gray matter atrophy … is to a lesser extent associated with the healthy aging process, but more likely with brain processes underlying significant cognitive decline” (p. 547) and “… cortical gray matter atrophy in the aging brain may be overestimated in a large number of studies on healthy aging” (p. 547). We analyzed the cross-sectional MR data (n = 1,037) as well as longitudinal data from a sample of very well-screened elderly followed by cognitive testing for 2 years. In the cross-sectional data, the correlations between age and brain volumes were generally not much reduced when the upper age limit was lowered. This would not be expected if age-related incipient cognitive disorders caused the correlations given that the incidence of cognitive decline increased with age. Longitudinally, 1-year atrophy was identified in all tested regions. It is likely that cortical brain atrophy is manifested in cognitively normal elderly without subclinical cognitive disorders.
doi:10.1037/a0018827
PMCID: PMC3068612  PMID: 20230119
aging; atrophy; cerebral cortex; hippocampus; cognition
19.  Efficient Correction of Inhomogeneous Static Magnetic Field-Induced Distortion in Echo Planar Imaging 
NeuroImage  2009;50(1):175.
Single-shot Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) is one of the most efficient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition schemes, producing relatively high-definition images in 100 ms or less. These qualities make it desirable for Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), functional MRI (fMRI), and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI (DSC-MRI). However, EPI suffers from severe spatial and intensity distortion due to B0 field inhomogeneity induced by magnetic susceptibility variations. Anatomically accurate, undistorted images are essential for relating DTI and fMRI images with anatomical MRI scans, and for spatial registration with other modalities. We present here a fast, robust, and accurate procedure for correcting EPI images from such spatial and intensity distortions. The method involves acquisition of scans with opposite phase encoding polarities, resulting in opposite spatial distortion patterns, and alignment of the resulting images using a fast nonlinear registration procedure. We show that this method, requiring minimal additional scan time, provides superior accuracy relative to the more commonly used, and more time consuming, field mapping approach. This method is also highly computationally efficient, allowing for direct ‘real-time’ implementation on the MRI scanner. We further demonstrate that the proposed method can be used to recover dropouts in gradient echo (BOLD and DSC-MRI) EPI images.
doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2009.11.044
PMCID: PMC2819607  PMID: 19944768
EPI distortion correction; fMRI dropout recovery; nonlinear registration; reverse phase encoding
20.  CSF biomarkers in prediction of cerebral and clinical change in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease 
Brain atrophy and altered CSF-levels of amyloid beta (Aβ42) and the microtubule-associated protein tau are potent biomarkers of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) related pathology. However, the relationship between CSF biomarkers and brain morphometry is poorly understood. Thus, we addressed the following questions: (1) Can CSF biomarker levels explain the morphometric differences between normal controls (NC) and patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or AD? (2) How are CSF biomarkers related to atrophy across the brain? (3) How closely are CSF biomarkers and morphometry related to clinical change (CDR sum of boxes [CDR-sb])? 370 participants (105 NC/ 175 MCI/ 90 AD) from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative were studied, of whom 309 were followed for one and 176 for two years. Analyses were performed across the entire cortical surface, as well as for 30 cortical and subcortical regions of interest (ROIs). Results showed that CSF biomarker levels could not account for group differences in brain morphometry at baseline but that CSF biomarker levels showed moderate relationships to longitudinal atrophy rates in numerous brain areas, not restricted to medial temporal structures. Baseline morphometry was at least as predictive of atrophy as were CSF biomarkers. Even MCI patients with levels of Aβ42 comparable to controls and of p-tau lower than controls showed more atrophy than the controls. Morphometry predicted change in CDR-sb better than did CSF biomarkers. These results indicate that morphometric changes in MCI and AD are not secondary to CSF biomarker changes, and that the two types of biomarkers yield complementary information.
doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3785-09.2010
PMCID: PMC2828879  PMID: 20147537
Alzheimer's disease; Magnetoencephalography; ABeta-peptide; Phosphorylation; Hippocampus; Cerebral cortex; Entorhinal cortex; Parahippocampal cortex
21.  One year brain atrophy evident in healthy aging 
An accurate description of changes in the brain in healthy aging is needed to understand the basis of age-related changes in cognitive function. Cross-sectional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies suggest thinning of the cerebral cortex, volumetric reductions of most subcortical structures and ventricular expansion. However, there is a paucity of detailed longitudinal studies to support the cross-sectional findings. In the present study, 142 healthy elderly participants (60–91 years) were followed with repeated MRI, and were compared to 122 patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD). Volume changes were measured across the entire cortex and in 48 regions of interest (ROIs). Cortical reductions in the healthy elderly were extensive after only one year, especially evident in temporal and prefrontal cortex where annual decline was about 0.5%. All subcortical and ventricular regions except caudate nucleus and the 4th ventricle changed significantly over one year. Some of the atrophy occurred in areas vulnerable to AD, while other changes were observed in areas less characteristic of the disease in early stages. This suggests that the changes are not primarily driven by degenerative processes associated with AD, although it is likely that preclinical changes associated with AD are superposed on changes due to normal aging in some subjects, especially in the temporal lobes. Finally, atrophy was found to accelerate with increasing age, and this was especially prominent in areas vulnerable to AD. Thus, it is possible that the accelerating atrophy with increasing age is due to preclinical AD.
doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3252-09.2009
PMCID: PMC2827793  PMID: 19955375
MRI; aging; longitudinal; ADNI; cerebral cortex; hippocampus
22.  Automated white-matter tractography using a probabilistic diffusion tensor atlas: Application to temporal lobe epilepsy 
Human brain mapping  2009;30(5):1535-1547.
Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging allows researchers and clinicians to identify individual white matter fiber tracts and map their trajectories. The reliability and interpretability of fiber tracking procedures is improved when a priori anatomical information is used as a guide. We have developed an automated method for labeling white matter fiber tracts in individual subjects based on a probabilistic atlas of fiber tract locations and orientations. The probabilistic fiber atlas contains 23 fiber tracts and was constructed by manually identifying fiber tracts in 21 healthy controls and 21 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The manual tract identification method required approximately 40 hours of manual editing by a trained image analyst using multiple regions of interest to select or exclude streamline fibers. Identification of fiber tracts with the atlas does not require human intervention, but nonetheless benefits from the a priori anatomical information that was used to manually identify the tracts included in the atlas. We applied this method to compare fractional anisotropy -- thought to be a measure of white matter integrity -- in individual fiber tracts between control subjects and TLE patients. We found that the atlas-based and manual fiber selection methods produced a similar pattern of results. However, the between-group effect sizes using the atlas-derived fibers were generally as large or larger than those obtained with manually selected fiber tracks.
doi:10.1002/hbm.20619
PMCID: PMC2754725  PMID: 18671230

Results 1-22 (22)